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In Vitro Propagation, Phytochemical Analysis, and Evaluation of Free Radical Scavenging Property of Scrophularia kakudensis Franch Tissue Extracts.

Manivannan A, Soundararajan P, Park YG, Jeong BR - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: The regenerated plants displayed successful survival ratio (95%) in the greenhouse.The highest content of acacetin, a pharmaceutically important flavonoid, was observed in the shoot extracts (in vitro: 32.83 µg·g(-1) FW; in vivo: 30.05 µg·g(-1) FW) followed by root extracts.Thus, the outcome of the present study can be highly beneficial for the germplasm conservation and commercial cultivation of S. kakudensis for therapeutic purposes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Applied Life Science (BK21 Plus), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
The current study deals with in vitro propagation, antioxidant property estimation, and assessment of acacetin content in Scrophularia kakudensis Franch. Adventitious shoot induction was achieved from the nodal explant with the highest number of adventitious shoots per explant (17.4) on Murashige and Skoog's (MS) medium fortified with 2.0 mg·L(-1) 6-benzyladenine (BA) and 0.5 mg L(-1) indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Maximum number of roots per plant (16.5) was noted in half strength MS medium supplemented with 0.5 mg·L(-1) IAA. The regenerated plants displayed successful survival ratio (95%) in the greenhouse. The highest content of acacetin, a pharmaceutically important flavonoid, was observed in the shoot extracts (in vitro: 32.83 µg·g(-1) FW; in vivo: 30.05 µg·g(-1) FW) followed by root extracts. Total phenol and flavonoid contents along with free radical scavenging assays revealed the occurrence of larger amount of antioxidants in shoot extract in comparison with callus and root extracts of S. kakudensis. Thus, the outcome of the present study can be highly beneficial for the germplasm conservation and commercial cultivation of S. kakudensis for therapeutic purposes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

HPLC results of acacetin content estimation in in vitro and in vivo plant extracts. The representative peaks obtained for acacetin in (a) in vitro shoot extract, (b) in vivo shoot extract, (c) callus extracts, (d) in vitro root extract, and (e) in vivo root extract of S. kakudensis and (f) reference. (g) The quantification of acacetin in tissue extracts of S. kakudensis. Different letters in one measurement indicate statistically significant difference at P ≤ 0.05 by Duncan multiple range test.
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fig3: HPLC results of acacetin content estimation in in vitro and in vivo plant extracts. The representative peaks obtained for acacetin in (a) in vitro shoot extract, (b) in vivo shoot extract, (c) callus extracts, (d) in vitro root extract, and (e) in vivo root extract of S. kakudensis and (f) reference. (g) The quantification of acacetin in tissue extracts of S. kakudensis. Different letters in one measurement indicate statistically significant difference at P ≤ 0.05 by Duncan multiple range test.

Mentions: The highest level of acacetin was estimated in shoot extracts of S. kakudensis (Figure 3). Among the extracts, ISE (32.83 μg·g−1 FW) and SE (30.05 μg·g−1 FW) were noted with the maximum acacetin content followed by the root extracts of both in vitro (IRE: 19.52 μg·g−1 FW) and ex vitro (RE: 18.23 μg·g−1 FW). The least amount of acacetin was estimated in the callus extract (14.91 μg·g−1 FW). Similarly the synthesis of acacetin in leaf tissue was recorded in Clerodendrum inerme, Dioscoreophyllum cumminsii, and Ocimum basilicum [31–33]. The slight increase in the accumulation of acacetin (an individual flavonoid) in in vitro plantlets might be triggered by the plant tissue culture environment and endogenous hormone modulations. According to Shohael et al. [34], the in vitro conditions enhance the secondary metabolite production through the modulation of plant primary metabolism. In addition, synthesis and gene expression levels of the secondary metabolites can be greatly influenced by the nutrient contents and plant hormones employed during the in vitro culture [35]. Likewise, the secondary metabolites production in in vitro plantlets was higher in Swertia chirayita than in vivo plantlets [36].


In Vitro Propagation, Phytochemical Analysis, and Evaluation of Free Radical Scavenging Property of Scrophularia kakudensis Franch Tissue Extracts.

Manivannan A, Soundararajan P, Park YG, Jeong BR - Biomed Res Int (2015)

HPLC results of acacetin content estimation in in vitro and in vivo plant extracts. The representative peaks obtained for acacetin in (a) in vitro shoot extract, (b) in vivo shoot extract, (c) callus extracts, (d) in vitro root extract, and (e) in vivo root extract of S. kakudensis and (f) reference. (g) The quantification of acacetin in tissue extracts of S. kakudensis. Different letters in one measurement indicate statistically significant difference at P ≤ 0.05 by Duncan multiple range test.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663745&req=5

fig3: HPLC results of acacetin content estimation in in vitro and in vivo plant extracts. The representative peaks obtained for acacetin in (a) in vitro shoot extract, (b) in vivo shoot extract, (c) callus extracts, (d) in vitro root extract, and (e) in vivo root extract of S. kakudensis and (f) reference. (g) The quantification of acacetin in tissue extracts of S. kakudensis. Different letters in one measurement indicate statistically significant difference at P ≤ 0.05 by Duncan multiple range test.
Mentions: The highest level of acacetin was estimated in shoot extracts of S. kakudensis (Figure 3). Among the extracts, ISE (32.83 μg·g−1 FW) and SE (30.05 μg·g−1 FW) were noted with the maximum acacetin content followed by the root extracts of both in vitro (IRE: 19.52 μg·g−1 FW) and ex vitro (RE: 18.23 μg·g−1 FW). The least amount of acacetin was estimated in the callus extract (14.91 μg·g−1 FW). Similarly the synthesis of acacetin in leaf tissue was recorded in Clerodendrum inerme, Dioscoreophyllum cumminsii, and Ocimum basilicum [31–33]. The slight increase in the accumulation of acacetin (an individual flavonoid) in in vitro plantlets might be triggered by the plant tissue culture environment and endogenous hormone modulations. According to Shohael et al. [34], the in vitro conditions enhance the secondary metabolite production through the modulation of plant primary metabolism. In addition, synthesis and gene expression levels of the secondary metabolites can be greatly influenced by the nutrient contents and plant hormones employed during the in vitro culture [35]. Likewise, the secondary metabolites production in in vitro plantlets was higher in Swertia chirayita than in vivo plantlets [36].

Bottom Line: The regenerated plants displayed successful survival ratio (95%) in the greenhouse.The highest content of acacetin, a pharmaceutically important flavonoid, was observed in the shoot extracts (in vitro: 32.83 µg·g(-1) FW; in vivo: 30.05 µg·g(-1) FW) followed by root extracts.Thus, the outcome of the present study can be highly beneficial for the germplasm conservation and commercial cultivation of S. kakudensis for therapeutic purposes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Applied Life Science (BK21 Plus), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
The current study deals with in vitro propagation, antioxidant property estimation, and assessment of acacetin content in Scrophularia kakudensis Franch. Adventitious shoot induction was achieved from the nodal explant with the highest number of adventitious shoots per explant (17.4) on Murashige and Skoog's (MS) medium fortified with 2.0 mg·L(-1) 6-benzyladenine (BA) and 0.5 mg L(-1) indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Maximum number of roots per plant (16.5) was noted in half strength MS medium supplemented with 0.5 mg·L(-1) IAA. The regenerated plants displayed successful survival ratio (95%) in the greenhouse. The highest content of acacetin, a pharmaceutically important flavonoid, was observed in the shoot extracts (in vitro: 32.83 µg·g(-1) FW; in vivo: 30.05 µg·g(-1) FW) followed by root extracts. Total phenol and flavonoid contents along with free radical scavenging assays revealed the occurrence of larger amount of antioxidants in shoot extract in comparison with callus and root extracts of S. kakudensis. Thus, the outcome of the present study can be highly beneficial for the germplasm conservation and commercial cultivation of S. kakudensis for therapeutic purposes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus