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Reported incidence of fever for under-5 children in Zambia: a longitudinal study.

Hamooya BM, Chongwe G, Sitali L, Halwindi H - Arch Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Magoye) [HR 1.35; 95 % CI 1.17, 1.56; p < 0.001]; and season (dry vs. rainy) [HR 0.17; 95 % CI 0.12, 0.23; p < 0.001].The study has shown that the incidence of fever was high in the study areas.There still exists the need for interventions aimed at reducing the incidence of fever in under five children, more especially in rural areas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ministry of Health, P.O Box 30205, Lusaka, Zambia ; Department of Public Health, The University of Zambia, School of Medicine, P.O. Box 50110, Lusaka, Zambia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Childhood fever is the most common clinical sign of Plasmodium falciparum infection. It is used as a measure of burden of the disease and the effectiveness of control programs for malaria. This study aimed to determine the incidence of fever in under-5 children of Magoye and Chivuna rural areas of Mazabuka district, Zambia.

Methods: Incidence of fever was evaluated longitudinally over a period of 16 months (July 2006 and November 2007) among children aged 12-59 months in Magoye and Chivuna rural communities. The data was collected for a study on community directed treatment of soil-transmitted helminth infections in under-five children. Data from caretakers of 1221 children were collected using a structured interviewer-administered questionnaire. Cox proportion hazard regression was used to determine predictors of multiple episodes of fever and Kaplan-Meier survival curves was used to compare survival between two groups.

Results: A total of 1221 under-5 children [median age 32 months; IQR 12-58] participated in the study and 696 (57 %) were from Magoye and 525 (43 %) from Chivuna. The incidence rate of fever was 162.4 per month per 1000 children for the 16 months period. The proportion of fever was not statistically related to children' age [p = 0.779] and sex [p = 0.546]. Predictors of multiple episodes of fever were: age (37-48 vs. 12-24 months) [HR 0.81; 95 % CI 0.67, 0.98; p = 0.030]; location (Chivuna vs. Magoye) [HR 1.35; 95 % CI 1.17, 1.56; p < 0.001]; and season (dry vs. rainy) [HR 0.17; 95 % CI 0.12, 0.23; p < 0.001].

Conclusion: The study has shown that the incidence of fever was high in the study areas. Febrile illnesses like malaria still have a significant effect on the health of under-5 children in the study population. There still exists the need for interventions aimed at reducing the incidence of fever in under five children, more especially in rural areas.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

K-M Survival Estimates; Probability of not having Fever by Study Site
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Fig2: K-M Survival Estimates; Probability of not having Fever by Study Site

Mentions: Magoye had a significantly higher probability of survival of under-5 children from fever compared to Chivuna (p < 0.001) as shown in Fig 2


Reported incidence of fever for under-5 children in Zambia: a longitudinal study.

Hamooya BM, Chongwe G, Sitali L, Halwindi H - Arch Public Health (2015)

K-M Survival Estimates; Probability of not having Fever by Study Site
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663728&req=5

Fig2: K-M Survival Estimates; Probability of not having Fever by Study Site
Mentions: Magoye had a significantly higher probability of survival of under-5 children from fever compared to Chivuna (p < 0.001) as shown in Fig 2

Bottom Line: Magoye) [HR 1.35; 95 % CI 1.17, 1.56; p < 0.001]; and season (dry vs. rainy) [HR 0.17; 95 % CI 0.12, 0.23; p < 0.001].The study has shown that the incidence of fever was high in the study areas.There still exists the need for interventions aimed at reducing the incidence of fever in under five children, more especially in rural areas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ministry of Health, P.O Box 30205, Lusaka, Zambia ; Department of Public Health, The University of Zambia, School of Medicine, P.O. Box 50110, Lusaka, Zambia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Childhood fever is the most common clinical sign of Plasmodium falciparum infection. It is used as a measure of burden of the disease and the effectiveness of control programs for malaria. This study aimed to determine the incidence of fever in under-5 children of Magoye and Chivuna rural areas of Mazabuka district, Zambia.

Methods: Incidence of fever was evaluated longitudinally over a period of 16 months (July 2006 and November 2007) among children aged 12-59 months in Magoye and Chivuna rural communities. The data was collected for a study on community directed treatment of soil-transmitted helminth infections in under-five children. Data from caretakers of 1221 children were collected using a structured interviewer-administered questionnaire. Cox proportion hazard regression was used to determine predictors of multiple episodes of fever and Kaplan-Meier survival curves was used to compare survival between two groups.

Results: A total of 1221 under-5 children [median age 32 months; IQR 12-58] participated in the study and 696 (57 %) were from Magoye and 525 (43 %) from Chivuna. The incidence rate of fever was 162.4 per month per 1000 children for the 16 months period. The proportion of fever was not statistically related to children' age [p = 0.779] and sex [p = 0.546]. Predictors of multiple episodes of fever were: age (37-48 vs. 12-24 months) [HR 0.81; 95 % CI 0.67, 0.98; p = 0.030]; location (Chivuna vs. Magoye) [HR 1.35; 95 % CI 1.17, 1.56; p < 0.001]; and season (dry vs. rainy) [HR 0.17; 95 % CI 0.12, 0.23; p < 0.001].

Conclusion: The study has shown that the incidence of fever was high in the study areas. Febrile illnesses like malaria still have a significant effect on the health of under-5 children in the study population. There still exists the need for interventions aimed at reducing the incidence of fever in under five children, more especially in rural areas.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus