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Antidepressant Use is Associated with Increased Energy Intake and Similar Levels of Physical Activity.

Jensen-Otsu E, Austin GL - Nutrients (2015)

Bottom Line: Antidepressants have been associated with weight gain, but the causes are unclear.These results suggest increased energy intake and sedentary behavior may contribute to weight gain associated with antidepressant use.Focusing on limiting food intake and sedentary behaviors may be important in mitigating the weight gain associated with antidepressant use.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Gastroenterology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. ejensenotsu@medicine.washington.edu.

ABSTRACT
Antidepressants have been associated with weight gain, but the causes are unclear. The aims of this study were to assess the association of antidepressant use with energy intake, macronutrient diet composition, and physical activity. We used data on medication use, energy intake, diet composition, and physical activity for 3073 eligible adults from the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Potential confounding variables, including depression symptoms, were included in the models assessing energy intake, physical activity, and sedentary behavior. Antidepressant users reported consuming an additional (mean ± S.E.) 215 ± 73 kcal/day compared to non-users (p = 0.01). There were no differences in percent calories from sugar, fat, or alcohol between the two groups. Antidepressant users had similar frequencies of walking or biking, engaging in muscle-strengthening activities, and engaging in moderate or vigorous physical activity. Antidepressant users were more likely to use a computer for ≥2 h/day (OR 1.77; 95% CI: 1.09-2.90), but TV watching was similar between the two groups. These results suggest increased energy intake and sedentary behavior may contribute to weight gain associated with antidepressant use. Focusing on limiting food intake and sedentary behaviors may be important in mitigating the weight gain associated with antidepressant use.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Adults taking antidepressants had similar self-reported measures of physical activity in the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey compared to those not taking antidepressants. Adjusted for Patient Health Questionnaire-9 depression score, tobacco/nicotine use, antipsychotic use, use of insulin, use of non-insulin diabetic medications, use of lipid-lowering medications, number of non-psychiatric/non-diabetic medications, self-assessed physical activity level, BMI category, education, race/ethnicity, and age. *Odds Ratio (OR) with 95% CI’s of antidepressant users compared to non-users.
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nutrients-07-05489-f003: Adults taking antidepressants had similar self-reported measures of physical activity in the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey compared to those not taking antidepressants. Adjusted for Patient Health Questionnaire-9 depression score, tobacco/nicotine use, antipsychotic use, use of insulin, use of non-insulin diabetic medications, use of lipid-lowering medications, number of non-psychiatric/non-diabetic medications, self-assessed physical activity level, BMI category, education, race/ethnicity, and age. *Odds Ratio (OR) with 95% CI’s of antidepressant users compared to non-users.

Mentions: When individuals were asked about engagement in particular activities in the preceding 30 days, antidepressant users reported similar levels of walking, biking, muscle strengthening, and any moderate or vigorous activity lasting at least consecutive 10 min (Figure 3). The overall percentage of individuals who walked or biked at least 150 min in the past 30 days was 18.0% (95% CI: 15.6%–20.4%), with antidepressant users reporting a similar frequency (Figure 3) compared to those not taking an antidepressant (OR 1.23 95% CI: 0.68–2.23). The overall percentage of individuals who participated in at last ten consecutive minutes of moderate or vigorous physical activity in the prior 30 days was 68.5% (95% CI: 64.8%–72.2%), and antidepressant users reported a similar frequency compared to non-users (OR 1.22; 95% CI: 0.72–2.07). The overall percentage of individuals who participated in muscle-strengthening activities within the previous 30 days was 30.6% (95% CI: 26.4%–34.7%), with antidepressant users as likely to have engaged in these activities (OR 1.05; 95% CI: 0.68–1.63). The PHQ-9 score was not associated with having walked or biked for greater than 150 min (p = 0.464) or having engaged in muscle-strengthening activities (p = 0.498) in the past 30 days. However, each 1-point increase in the PHQ-9 score was associated with a decrease in the odds of having engaged in at least 10 consecutive minutes of moderate or vigorous physical activity (OR 0.94, 95% CI: 0.91–0.97; p < 0.001).


Antidepressant Use is Associated with Increased Energy Intake and Similar Levels of Physical Activity.

Jensen-Otsu E, Austin GL - Nutrients (2015)

Adults taking antidepressants had similar self-reported measures of physical activity in the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey compared to those not taking antidepressants. Adjusted for Patient Health Questionnaire-9 depression score, tobacco/nicotine use, antipsychotic use, use of insulin, use of non-insulin diabetic medications, use of lipid-lowering medications, number of non-psychiatric/non-diabetic medications, self-assessed physical activity level, BMI category, education, race/ethnicity, and age. *Odds Ratio (OR) with 95% CI’s of antidepressant users compared to non-users.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663617&req=5

nutrients-07-05489-f003: Adults taking antidepressants had similar self-reported measures of physical activity in the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey compared to those not taking antidepressants. Adjusted for Patient Health Questionnaire-9 depression score, tobacco/nicotine use, antipsychotic use, use of insulin, use of non-insulin diabetic medications, use of lipid-lowering medications, number of non-psychiatric/non-diabetic medications, self-assessed physical activity level, BMI category, education, race/ethnicity, and age. *Odds Ratio (OR) with 95% CI’s of antidepressant users compared to non-users.
Mentions: When individuals were asked about engagement in particular activities in the preceding 30 days, antidepressant users reported similar levels of walking, biking, muscle strengthening, and any moderate or vigorous activity lasting at least consecutive 10 min (Figure 3). The overall percentage of individuals who walked or biked at least 150 min in the past 30 days was 18.0% (95% CI: 15.6%–20.4%), with antidepressant users reporting a similar frequency (Figure 3) compared to those not taking an antidepressant (OR 1.23 95% CI: 0.68–2.23). The overall percentage of individuals who participated in at last ten consecutive minutes of moderate or vigorous physical activity in the prior 30 days was 68.5% (95% CI: 64.8%–72.2%), and antidepressant users reported a similar frequency compared to non-users (OR 1.22; 95% CI: 0.72–2.07). The overall percentage of individuals who participated in muscle-strengthening activities within the previous 30 days was 30.6% (95% CI: 26.4%–34.7%), with antidepressant users as likely to have engaged in these activities (OR 1.05; 95% CI: 0.68–1.63). The PHQ-9 score was not associated with having walked or biked for greater than 150 min (p = 0.464) or having engaged in muscle-strengthening activities (p = 0.498) in the past 30 days. However, each 1-point increase in the PHQ-9 score was associated with a decrease in the odds of having engaged in at least 10 consecutive minutes of moderate or vigorous physical activity (OR 0.94, 95% CI: 0.91–0.97; p < 0.001).

Bottom Line: Antidepressants have been associated with weight gain, but the causes are unclear.These results suggest increased energy intake and sedentary behavior may contribute to weight gain associated with antidepressant use.Focusing on limiting food intake and sedentary behaviors may be important in mitigating the weight gain associated with antidepressant use.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Gastroenterology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. ejensenotsu@medicine.washington.edu.

ABSTRACT
Antidepressants have been associated with weight gain, but the causes are unclear. The aims of this study were to assess the association of antidepressant use with energy intake, macronutrient diet composition, and physical activity. We used data on medication use, energy intake, diet composition, and physical activity for 3073 eligible adults from the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Potential confounding variables, including depression symptoms, were included in the models assessing energy intake, physical activity, and sedentary behavior. Antidepressant users reported consuming an additional (mean ± S.E.) 215 ± 73 kcal/day compared to non-users (p = 0.01). There were no differences in percent calories from sugar, fat, or alcohol between the two groups. Antidepressant users had similar frequencies of walking or biking, engaging in muscle-strengthening activities, and engaging in moderate or vigorous physical activity. Antidepressant users were more likely to use a computer for ≥2 h/day (OR 1.77; 95% CI: 1.09-2.90), but TV watching was similar between the two groups. These results suggest increased energy intake and sedentary behavior may contribute to weight gain associated with antidepressant use. Focusing on limiting food intake and sedentary behaviors may be important in mitigating the weight gain associated with antidepressant use.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus