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Analysis of Dietary Pattern Impact on Weight Status for Personalised Nutrition through On-Line Advice: The Food4Me Spanish Cohort.

San-Cristobal R, Navas-Carretero S, Celis-Morales C, Brennan L, Walsh M, Lovegrove JA, Daniel H, Saris WH, Traczyk I, Manios Y, Gibney ER, Gibney MJ, Mathers JC, Martinez JA - Nutrients (2015)

Bottom Line: A total of four categories were defined (Prudent, Healthy, Western, and Compensatory) through classification of the sample in higher or lower adherence to each factor and combining the possibilities.Western and Compensatory dietary patterns, which were characterized by high-density foods consumption, showed positive associations with overweight prevalence.Further analysis showed that prevention of overweight must focus on limiting the intake of known deleterious foods rather than exclusively enhance healthy products.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nutrition, Food Science and Physiology, Centre for Nutrition Research, University of Navarra, Pamplona 31008, Spain. rsan.1@alumni.unav.es.

ABSTRACT
Obesity prevalence is increasing. The management of this condition requires a detailed analysis of the global risk factors in order to develop personalised advice. This study is aimed to identify current dietary patterns and habits in Spanish population interested in personalised nutrition and investigate associations with weight status. Self-reported dietary and anthropometrical data from the Spanish participants in the Food4Me study, were used in a multidimensional exploratory analysis to define specific dietary profiles. Two opposing factors were obtained according to food groups' intake: Factor 1 characterised by a more frequent consumption of traditionally considered unhealthy foods; and Factor 2, where the consumption of "Mediterranean diet" foods was prevalent. Factor 1 showed a direct relationship with BMI (β = 0.226; r² = 0.259; p < 0.001), while the association with Factor 2 was inverse (β = -0.037; r² = 0.230; p = 0.348). A total of four categories were defined (Prudent, Healthy, Western, and Compensatory) through classification of the sample in higher or lower adherence to each factor and combining the possibilities. Western and Compensatory dietary patterns, which were characterized by high-density foods consumption, showed positive associations with overweight prevalence. Further analysis showed that prevention of overweight must focus on limiting the intake of known deleterious foods rather than exclusively enhance healthy products.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flowchart of selection of sample.
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nutrients-07-05482-f001: Flowchart of selection of sample.

Mentions: The subjects were selected from the Food4Me project (Trial registration: NCT01530139 http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01530139). This trial was a web-based randomised controlled intervention carried out to bring about a Personalised Nutrition assessment in seven European countries [14]. All participants that signed up on the Spanish webpage (http://www.food4me.org/es/) from November 2013 to February 2014 (n = 1839 individuals) were selected as potential participants for the Food4Me project. To be included in the study, the volunteers had to complete two screening questionnaires, the first of them about their socio-demographic characteristics, while the second one included also medication, habits and a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ). If the participants met the inclusion criteria, two consent forms were given to sign in order to proceed [14]. The criteria to be eligible to participate in the Food4Me study were the following: participants had to be more than 18 years-old, not having followed a prescribed diet within the three months prior to the study, to have access to the internet, and not to suffer any physiological condition (pregnancy) or chronic metabolic disease (Diabetes, Crohn’s disease, thyroid disorders, etc.). Afterwards, to ensure the validity of data collection, all the volunteers that could be considered misreporting based on the energy intake (over-reporting and under-reporting) were excluded according to the Goldberg cut-offs as updated by Black [15]. Finally the study was carried out in 617 volunteers meeting the mentioned inclusion criteria (Figure 1).


Analysis of Dietary Pattern Impact on Weight Status for Personalised Nutrition through On-Line Advice: The Food4Me Spanish Cohort.

San-Cristobal R, Navas-Carretero S, Celis-Morales C, Brennan L, Walsh M, Lovegrove JA, Daniel H, Saris WH, Traczyk I, Manios Y, Gibney ER, Gibney MJ, Mathers JC, Martinez JA - Nutrients (2015)

Flowchart of selection of sample.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663610&req=5

nutrients-07-05482-f001: Flowchart of selection of sample.
Mentions: The subjects were selected from the Food4Me project (Trial registration: NCT01530139 http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01530139). This trial was a web-based randomised controlled intervention carried out to bring about a Personalised Nutrition assessment in seven European countries [14]. All participants that signed up on the Spanish webpage (http://www.food4me.org/es/) from November 2013 to February 2014 (n = 1839 individuals) were selected as potential participants for the Food4Me project. To be included in the study, the volunteers had to complete two screening questionnaires, the first of them about their socio-demographic characteristics, while the second one included also medication, habits and a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ). If the participants met the inclusion criteria, two consent forms were given to sign in order to proceed [14]. The criteria to be eligible to participate in the Food4Me study were the following: participants had to be more than 18 years-old, not having followed a prescribed diet within the three months prior to the study, to have access to the internet, and not to suffer any physiological condition (pregnancy) or chronic metabolic disease (Diabetes, Crohn’s disease, thyroid disorders, etc.). Afterwards, to ensure the validity of data collection, all the volunteers that could be considered misreporting based on the energy intake (over-reporting and under-reporting) were excluded according to the Goldberg cut-offs as updated by Black [15]. Finally the study was carried out in 617 volunteers meeting the mentioned inclusion criteria (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: A total of four categories were defined (Prudent, Healthy, Western, and Compensatory) through classification of the sample in higher or lower adherence to each factor and combining the possibilities.Western and Compensatory dietary patterns, which were characterized by high-density foods consumption, showed positive associations with overweight prevalence.Further analysis showed that prevention of overweight must focus on limiting the intake of known deleterious foods rather than exclusively enhance healthy products.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nutrition, Food Science and Physiology, Centre for Nutrition Research, University of Navarra, Pamplona 31008, Spain. rsan.1@alumni.unav.es.

ABSTRACT
Obesity prevalence is increasing. The management of this condition requires a detailed analysis of the global risk factors in order to develop personalised advice. This study is aimed to identify current dietary patterns and habits in Spanish population interested in personalised nutrition and investigate associations with weight status. Self-reported dietary and anthropometrical data from the Spanish participants in the Food4Me study, were used in a multidimensional exploratory analysis to define specific dietary profiles. Two opposing factors were obtained according to food groups' intake: Factor 1 characterised by a more frequent consumption of traditionally considered unhealthy foods; and Factor 2, where the consumption of "Mediterranean diet" foods was prevalent. Factor 1 showed a direct relationship with BMI (β = 0.226; r² = 0.259; p < 0.001), while the association with Factor 2 was inverse (β = -0.037; r² = 0.230; p = 0.348). A total of four categories were defined (Prudent, Healthy, Western, and Compensatory) through classification of the sample in higher or lower adherence to each factor and combining the possibilities. Western and Compensatory dietary patterns, which were characterized by high-density foods consumption, showed positive associations with overweight prevalence. Further analysis showed that prevention of overweight must focus on limiting the intake of known deleterious foods rather than exclusively enhance healthy products.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus