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Dietary Intake according to Gender and Education: A Twenty-Year Trend in a Swiss Adult Population.

Marques-Vidal P, Rousi E, Paccaud F, Gaspoz JM, Theler JM, Bochud M, Stringhini S, Guessous I - Nutrients (2015)

Bottom Line: Higher educated women had a greater decrease in iron intake than lower educated women: -0.03 (-0.04; -0.02) vs. -0.01 (-0.02; 0.00) mg/day/year, p for interaction = 0.002.We conclude that, in Switzerland, dietary intake evolved similarly between 1993 and 2012 in both educational groups.Educational differences present in 1993 persisted in 2012.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Internal Medicine, Lausanne University Hospital (CHUV), Lausanne 1010, Switzerland. Pedro-Manuel.Marques-Vidal@chuv.ch.

ABSTRACT
We assessed trends in dietary intake according to gender and education using repeated cross-sectional, population-based surveys conducted between 1993 and 2012 in Geneva, Switzerland (17,263 participants, 52.0 ± 10.6 years, 48% male). In 1993-1999, higher educated men had higher monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), carotene and vitamin D intakes than lower educated men, and the differences decreased in 2006-2012. In 1993-1999, higher educated women had higher fiber, iron, carotene, vitamin D and alcohol intakes than lower educated women, and the differences decreased in 2006-2012. Total energy, polyunsaturated fatty acids, retinol and alcohol intakes decreased, while mono/disaccharides, MUFA and carotene intake increased in both genders. Lower educated men had stronger decreases in saturated fatty acid (SFA) and calcium intakes than higher educated men: multivariate-adjusted slope and 95% confidence interval -0.11 (-0.15; -0.06) vs. -0.03 (-0.08; 0.02) g/day/year for SFA and -5.2 (-7.8; -2.7) vs. -1.03 (-3.8; 1.8) mg/day/year for calcium, p for interaction <0.05. Higher educated women had a greater decrease in iron intake than lower educated women: -0.03 (-0.04; -0.02) vs. -0.01 (-0.02; 0.00) mg/day/year, p for interaction = 0.002. We conclude that, in Switzerland, dietary intake evolved similarly between 1993 and 2012 in both educational groups. Educational differences present in 1993 persisted in 2012.

No MeSH data available.


Unadjusted trends for saturated fatty acids (upper panel), calcium (middle panel) and iron (lower panel) according to gender and educational level, 1993–2012, Geneva, Switzerland.
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nutrients-07-05481-f001: Unadjusted trends for saturated fatty acids (upper panel), calcium (middle panel) and iron (lower panel) according to gender and educational level, 1993–2012, Geneva, Switzerland.

Mentions: Trends in TEI and nutrient intake overall and according to high or low educational level in men are summarized in Table S2a (unadjusted or energy-adjusted for nutrients) and in Table 3 (a) (multivariable adjusted). Total energy, SFA, poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), calcium, retinol and alcohol intake decreased, while total carbohydrates, mono/disaccharide, MUFA and carotene increased in all groups. When fiber was split into cereal-derived and fruit and vegetable-derived fiber, opposite trends were found: cereal-derived fiber decreased while fruit and vegetable-derived fiber increased. No significant interactions with education were found for TEI and most nutrients, except a trend towards stronger decreases in SFA and calcium intake among participants with non-university level (Figure 1 and Table 3 (a)).


Dietary Intake according to Gender and Education: A Twenty-Year Trend in a Swiss Adult Population.

Marques-Vidal P, Rousi E, Paccaud F, Gaspoz JM, Theler JM, Bochud M, Stringhini S, Guessous I - Nutrients (2015)

Unadjusted trends for saturated fatty acids (upper panel), calcium (middle panel) and iron (lower panel) according to gender and educational level, 1993–2012, Geneva, Switzerland.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663609&req=5

nutrients-07-05481-f001: Unadjusted trends for saturated fatty acids (upper panel), calcium (middle panel) and iron (lower panel) according to gender and educational level, 1993–2012, Geneva, Switzerland.
Mentions: Trends in TEI and nutrient intake overall and according to high or low educational level in men are summarized in Table S2a (unadjusted or energy-adjusted for nutrients) and in Table 3 (a) (multivariable adjusted). Total energy, SFA, poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), calcium, retinol and alcohol intake decreased, while total carbohydrates, mono/disaccharide, MUFA and carotene increased in all groups. When fiber was split into cereal-derived and fruit and vegetable-derived fiber, opposite trends were found: cereal-derived fiber decreased while fruit and vegetable-derived fiber increased. No significant interactions with education were found for TEI and most nutrients, except a trend towards stronger decreases in SFA and calcium intake among participants with non-university level (Figure 1 and Table 3 (a)).

Bottom Line: Higher educated women had a greater decrease in iron intake than lower educated women: -0.03 (-0.04; -0.02) vs. -0.01 (-0.02; 0.00) mg/day/year, p for interaction = 0.002.We conclude that, in Switzerland, dietary intake evolved similarly between 1993 and 2012 in both educational groups.Educational differences present in 1993 persisted in 2012.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Internal Medicine, Lausanne University Hospital (CHUV), Lausanne 1010, Switzerland. Pedro-Manuel.Marques-Vidal@chuv.ch.

ABSTRACT
We assessed trends in dietary intake according to gender and education using repeated cross-sectional, population-based surveys conducted between 1993 and 2012 in Geneva, Switzerland (17,263 participants, 52.0 ± 10.6 years, 48% male). In 1993-1999, higher educated men had higher monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), carotene and vitamin D intakes than lower educated men, and the differences decreased in 2006-2012. In 1993-1999, higher educated women had higher fiber, iron, carotene, vitamin D and alcohol intakes than lower educated women, and the differences decreased in 2006-2012. Total energy, polyunsaturated fatty acids, retinol and alcohol intakes decreased, while mono/disaccharides, MUFA and carotene intake increased in both genders. Lower educated men had stronger decreases in saturated fatty acid (SFA) and calcium intakes than higher educated men: multivariate-adjusted slope and 95% confidence interval -0.11 (-0.15; -0.06) vs. -0.03 (-0.08; 0.02) g/day/year for SFA and -5.2 (-7.8; -2.7) vs. -1.03 (-3.8; 1.8) mg/day/year for calcium, p for interaction <0.05. Higher educated women had a greater decrease in iron intake than lower educated women: -0.03 (-0.04; -0.02) vs. -0.01 (-0.02; 0.00) mg/day/year, p for interaction = 0.002. We conclude that, in Switzerland, dietary intake evolved similarly between 1993 and 2012 in both educational groups. Educational differences present in 1993 persisted in 2012.

No MeSH data available.