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Fat Quality Influences the Obesogenic Effect of High Fat Diets.

Crescenzo R, Bianco F, Mazzoli A, Giacco A, Cancelliere R, di Fabio G, Zarrelli A, Liverini G, Iossa S - Nutrients (2015)

Bottom Line: Hepatic functionality, plasma parameters, and oxidative status were also measured.The results show that feeding on safflower/linseed oil diet attenuates the obesogenic effect of high fat diets and ameliorates the blood lipid profile.Conversely, hepatic steatosis and mitochondrial oxidative stress appear to be negatively affected by a diet rich in unsaturated fatty acids.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Federico II University, Via Cinthia, 80138 Naples, Italy. rcrescen@unina.it.

ABSTRACT
High fat and/or carbohydrate intake are associated with an elevated risk for obesity and chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The harmful effects of a high fat diet could be different, depending on dietary fat quality. In fact, high fat diets rich in unsaturated fatty acids are considered less deleterious for human health than those rich in saturated fat. In our previous studies, we have shown that rats fed a high fat diet developed obesity and exhibited a decrease in oxidative capacity and an increase in oxidative stress in liver mitochondria. To investigate whether polyunsaturated fats could attenuate the above deleterious effects of high fat diets, energy balance and body composition were assessed after two weeks in rats fed isocaloric amounts of a high-fat diet (58.2% by energy) rich either in lard or safflower/linseed oil. Hepatic functionality, plasma parameters, and oxidative status were also measured. The results show that feeding on safflower/linseed oil diet attenuates the obesogenic effect of high fat diets and ameliorates the blood lipid profile. Conversely, hepatic steatosis and mitochondrial oxidative stress appear to be negatively affected by a diet rich in unsaturated fatty acids.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Body lipids (A) body proteins; (B) body epididymal WAT; (C) body visceral WAT (D) and body interscapular BAT (F) at day 0 and 14 of the experiment and UCP1 content in interscapular BAT (E) at day 14 of experiment in rats fed lard or safflower-linseed high fat diet. Values are reported as means with their standard errors. n = 8 different rats, except that for UCP1 western blots (n = 6). * p < 0.05 compared to lard. WAT = white adipose tissue, BAT = brown adipose tissue, UCP1 = uncoupling protein 1.
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nutrients-07-05480-f001: Body lipids (A) body proteins; (B) body epididymal WAT; (C) body visceral WAT (D) and body interscapular BAT (F) at day 0 and 14 of the experiment and UCP1 content in interscapular BAT (E) at day 14 of experiment in rats fed lard or safflower-linseed high fat diet. Values are reported as means with their standard errors. n = 8 different rats, except that for UCP1 western blots (n = 6). * p < 0.05 compared to lard. WAT = white adipose tissue, BAT = brown adipose tissue, UCP1 = uncoupling protein 1.

Mentions: After two weeks of isocaloric high fat feeding, obesity development was evident both in L and S rats, since their percentage of body lipids about doubled compared to initial value, although the final value was significantly lower in S rats than in L rats (Figure 1A). In addition, the percent of epididymal and visceral white adipose tissue (WAT) increased during dietary treatment, reaching a final value that was significantly lower in S rats than in L rats (Figure 1C,D). The percent of IBAT was significantly higher in S rats than in L rats (Figure 1F), and its content of UCP1 was markedly increased in S rats compared to L rats (Figure 1E). Finally, the percent of body protein was maintained constant after two weeks of dietary treatment in S rats, while it significantly decreased in L rats (Figure 1B). As a consequence, S rats exhibited lower lipid gain and epididymal fat weight, while protein gain was significantly higher, compared to L rats (Table 2).


Fat Quality Influences the Obesogenic Effect of High Fat Diets.

Crescenzo R, Bianco F, Mazzoli A, Giacco A, Cancelliere R, di Fabio G, Zarrelli A, Liverini G, Iossa S - Nutrients (2015)

Body lipids (A) body proteins; (B) body epididymal WAT; (C) body visceral WAT (D) and body interscapular BAT (F) at day 0 and 14 of the experiment and UCP1 content in interscapular BAT (E) at day 14 of experiment in rats fed lard or safflower-linseed high fat diet. Values are reported as means with their standard errors. n = 8 different rats, except that for UCP1 western blots (n = 6). * p < 0.05 compared to lard. WAT = white adipose tissue, BAT = brown adipose tissue, UCP1 = uncoupling protein 1.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663608&req=5

nutrients-07-05480-f001: Body lipids (A) body proteins; (B) body epididymal WAT; (C) body visceral WAT (D) and body interscapular BAT (F) at day 0 and 14 of the experiment and UCP1 content in interscapular BAT (E) at day 14 of experiment in rats fed lard or safflower-linseed high fat diet. Values are reported as means with their standard errors. n = 8 different rats, except that for UCP1 western blots (n = 6). * p < 0.05 compared to lard. WAT = white adipose tissue, BAT = brown adipose tissue, UCP1 = uncoupling protein 1.
Mentions: After two weeks of isocaloric high fat feeding, obesity development was evident both in L and S rats, since their percentage of body lipids about doubled compared to initial value, although the final value was significantly lower in S rats than in L rats (Figure 1A). In addition, the percent of epididymal and visceral white adipose tissue (WAT) increased during dietary treatment, reaching a final value that was significantly lower in S rats than in L rats (Figure 1C,D). The percent of IBAT was significantly higher in S rats than in L rats (Figure 1F), and its content of UCP1 was markedly increased in S rats compared to L rats (Figure 1E). Finally, the percent of body protein was maintained constant after two weeks of dietary treatment in S rats, while it significantly decreased in L rats (Figure 1B). As a consequence, S rats exhibited lower lipid gain and epididymal fat weight, while protein gain was significantly higher, compared to L rats (Table 2).

Bottom Line: Hepatic functionality, plasma parameters, and oxidative status were also measured.The results show that feeding on safflower/linseed oil diet attenuates the obesogenic effect of high fat diets and ameliorates the blood lipid profile.Conversely, hepatic steatosis and mitochondrial oxidative stress appear to be negatively affected by a diet rich in unsaturated fatty acids.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Federico II University, Via Cinthia, 80138 Naples, Italy. rcrescen@unina.it.

ABSTRACT
High fat and/or carbohydrate intake are associated with an elevated risk for obesity and chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The harmful effects of a high fat diet could be different, depending on dietary fat quality. In fact, high fat diets rich in unsaturated fatty acids are considered less deleterious for human health than those rich in saturated fat. In our previous studies, we have shown that rats fed a high fat diet developed obesity and exhibited a decrease in oxidative capacity and an increase in oxidative stress in liver mitochondria. To investigate whether polyunsaturated fats could attenuate the above deleterious effects of high fat diets, energy balance and body composition were assessed after two weeks in rats fed isocaloric amounts of a high-fat diet (58.2% by energy) rich either in lard or safflower/linseed oil. Hepatic functionality, plasma parameters, and oxidative status were also measured. The results show that feeding on safflower/linseed oil diet attenuates the obesogenic effect of high fat diets and ameliorates the blood lipid profile. Conversely, hepatic steatosis and mitochondrial oxidative stress appear to be negatively affected by a diet rich in unsaturated fatty acids.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus