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A Priori and a Posteriori Dietary Patterns during Pregnancy and Gestational Weight Gain: The Generation R Study.

Tielemans MJ, Erler NS, Leermakers ET, van den Broek M, Jaddoe VW, Steegers EA, Kiefte-de Jong JC, Franco OH - Nutrients (2015)

Bottom Line: Abnormal gestational weight gain (GWG) is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes.We examined whether dietary patterns are associated with GWG.The a priori-defined pattern was not associated with GWG.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, P.O. Box 2040, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands. m.tielemans@erasmusmc.nl.

ABSTRACT
Abnormal gestational weight gain (GWG) is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. We examined whether dietary patterns are associated with GWG. Participants included 3374 pregnant women from a population-based cohort in the Netherlands. Dietary intake during pregnancy was assessed with food-frequency questionnaires. Three a posteriori-derived dietary patterns were identified using principal component analysis: a "Vegetable, oil and fish", a "Nuts, high-fiber cereals and soy", and a "Margarine, sugar and snacks" pattern. The a priori-defined dietary pattern was based on national dietary recommendations. Weight was repeatedly measured around 13, 20 and 30 weeks of pregnancy; pre-pregnancy and maximum weight were self-reported. Normal weight women with high adherence to the "Vegetable, oil and fish" pattern had higher early-pregnancy GWG than those with low adherence (43 g/week (95% CI 16; 69) for highest vs. lowest quartile (Q)). Adherence to the "Margarine, sugar and snacks" pattern was associated with a higher prevalence of excessive GWG (OR 1.45 (95% CI 1.06; 1.99) Q4 vs. Q1). Normal weight women with higher scores on the "Nuts, high-fiber cereals and soy" pattern had more moderate GWG than women with lower scores (-0.01 (95% CI -0.02; -0.00) per SD). The a priori-defined pattern was not associated with GWG. To conclude, specific dietary patterns may play a role in early pregnancy but are not consistently associated with GWG.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow chart of the study population: the Generation R Study (2002–2006). * Population in which the a posteriori-derived dietary patterns were determined. Abbreviations: BMI: body mass index; FFQ: food-frequency questionnaire.
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nutrients-07-05476-f001: Flow chart of the study population: the Generation R Study (2002–2006). * Population in which the a posteriori-derived dietary patterns were determined. Abbreviations: BMI: body mass index; FFQ: food-frequency questionnaire.

Mentions: For the current analysis, we included women of Dutch ancestry who entered the Generation R Study during pregnancy (n = 4097). We did not include women of non-Dutch ancestry because the dietary assessment method that we used was designed to evaluate a Dutch diet. We excluded women with missing dietary information (n = 538) and restricted our analysis to women with singleton live births (n = 3479). We excluded 5 women whose weight was not measured during pregnancy. Finally, we excluded women who were underweight before pregnancy (body mass index (BMI) < 18.5 kg/m2; n = 100), leaving 3374 women for the current analysis (Figure 1).


A Priori and a Posteriori Dietary Patterns during Pregnancy and Gestational Weight Gain: The Generation R Study.

Tielemans MJ, Erler NS, Leermakers ET, van den Broek M, Jaddoe VW, Steegers EA, Kiefte-de Jong JC, Franco OH - Nutrients (2015)

Flow chart of the study population: the Generation R Study (2002–2006). * Population in which the a posteriori-derived dietary patterns were determined. Abbreviations: BMI: body mass index; FFQ: food-frequency questionnaire.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663604&req=5

nutrients-07-05476-f001: Flow chart of the study population: the Generation R Study (2002–2006). * Population in which the a posteriori-derived dietary patterns were determined. Abbreviations: BMI: body mass index; FFQ: food-frequency questionnaire.
Mentions: For the current analysis, we included women of Dutch ancestry who entered the Generation R Study during pregnancy (n = 4097). We did not include women of non-Dutch ancestry because the dietary assessment method that we used was designed to evaluate a Dutch diet. We excluded women with missing dietary information (n = 538) and restricted our analysis to women with singleton live births (n = 3479). We excluded 5 women whose weight was not measured during pregnancy. Finally, we excluded women who were underweight before pregnancy (body mass index (BMI) < 18.5 kg/m2; n = 100), leaving 3374 women for the current analysis (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Abnormal gestational weight gain (GWG) is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes.We examined whether dietary patterns are associated with GWG.The a priori-defined pattern was not associated with GWG.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, P.O. Box 2040, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands. m.tielemans@erasmusmc.nl.

ABSTRACT
Abnormal gestational weight gain (GWG) is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. We examined whether dietary patterns are associated with GWG. Participants included 3374 pregnant women from a population-based cohort in the Netherlands. Dietary intake during pregnancy was assessed with food-frequency questionnaires. Three a posteriori-derived dietary patterns were identified using principal component analysis: a "Vegetable, oil and fish", a "Nuts, high-fiber cereals and soy", and a "Margarine, sugar and snacks" pattern. The a priori-defined dietary pattern was based on national dietary recommendations. Weight was repeatedly measured around 13, 20 and 30 weeks of pregnancy; pre-pregnancy and maximum weight were self-reported. Normal weight women with high adherence to the "Vegetable, oil and fish" pattern had higher early-pregnancy GWG than those with low adherence (43 g/week (95% CI 16; 69) for highest vs. lowest quartile (Q)). Adherence to the "Margarine, sugar and snacks" pattern was associated with a higher prevalence of excessive GWG (OR 1.45 (95% CI 1.06; 1.99) Q4 vs. Q1). Normal weight women with higher scores on the "Nuts, high-fiber cereals and soy" pattern had more moderate GWG than women with lower scores (-0.01 (95% CI -0.02; -0.00) per SD). The a priori-defined pattern was not associated with GWG. To conclude, specific dietary patterns may play a role in early pregnancy but are not consistently associated with GWG.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus