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Association between Dietary Patterns and Atopic Dermatitis in Relation to GSTM1 and GSTT1 Polymorphisms in Young Children.

Chung J, Kwon SO, Ahn H, Hwang H, Hong SJ, Oh SY - Nutrients (2015)

Bottom Line: Results from the multiplicative test analyses showed that the "traditional healthy" diet on reduced AD was significant or borderline significant in the GSTM1-present group (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.54-0.92 vs.GSTM1/T1 double group).These findings demonstrate that the present type of GSTM1 may increase susceptibility to the potential effect of the "traditional healthy" diet on AD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Food & Nutrition, Research Center for Human Ecology, College of Human Ecology, Kyung Hee University, 26, Kyungheedae-ro, Hoegi-dong, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 02447, Korea. jchung@khu.ac.kr.

ABSTRACT
Previous research suggests the association of glutathione S-transferase (GST) gene polymorphisms or diet, but no interactions between these factors in atopic dermatitis (AD). We conducted a community-based case-control study including 194 AD and 244 matched non-AD preschoolers. Glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) and T1 (GSTT1) present/ genotypes were evaluated uisng a multiplex PCR method. We measured dietary intakes by a validated food frequency questionnaire and constructed three dietary patterns such as "traditional healthy", "animal foods", and "sweets" diets. In stratified analyses by GST genotypes, the "traditional healthy" diet and reduced AD showed association only in the GSTM1-present group (odd ratio (OR) 0.31, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.13-0.75). A similar pattern of the association existed in the combined GSTM1/T1 genotype that indicated the inverse association between the "traditional healthy" diet and AD in the double GSTM1/T1-present genotype group (OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.06-0.93). Results from the multiplicative test analyses showed that the "traditional healthy" diet on reduced AD was significant or borderline significant in the GSTM1-present group (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.54-0.92 vs. GSTM1- group) or the GSTM1/T1 double present group (OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.39-1.03 vs. GSTM1/T1 double group). These findings demonstrate that the present type of GSTM1 may increase susceptibility to the potential effect of the "traditional healthy" diet on AD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Sample selection process. Atopic Dermatitis (AD).
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nutrients-07-05473-f001: Sample selection process. Atopic Dermatitis (AD).

Mentions: As shown in Figure 1, at the beginning, our participants were from a population based and matched case-control study including 781 subjects who were selected by screening eligibility from 2638 preschoolers residing in middle-income areas in large cities in Korea such as Seoul and Incheon between May and July 2006 [10,23]. We assessed the child’s AD by the Korean version of ISAAC (The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood) [10,23]. Case subjects were children who had experienced AD symptoms in the form of AD diagnosis or treatment (n = 351), and controls were matched by the same preschools (n = 430), considering both age and gender. Of those 781 participants, we excluded 343 children who had no dietary intake variables (n = 179; 82 AD, 97 non-AD), energy intake less than 500 kcal or greater than 4,500 kcal (n = 15; 7 AD, 8 non-AD), modified diet by AD (n = 36; 26 AD, 10 non-AD) or other diseases (n = 8; 7 AD, 1 non-AD), or no genetic information (n = 105; 35 AD, 70 non-AD). A total of 438 (194 AD, 244 non-AD) children were included in our data analyses (Figure 1). Due to the exclusion of a large number of children, we did comparison analysis including the child’s age (5.3 vs. 5.2 years), BMI (15.4 vs. 15.5) and gender (48.3% vs. 50.3% for girls), as well as household monthly income (38.4% vs. 33.8% for greater than 4 million Korean Won, close to 4000 US $). There was no significant group difference in these variables (Supplementary Table S1).


Association between Dietary Patterns and Atopic Dermatitis in Relation to GSTM1 and GSTT1 Polymorphisms in Young Children.

Chung J, Kwon SO, Ahn H, Hwang H, Hong SJ, Oh SY - Nutrients (2015)

Sample selection process. Atopic Dermatitis (AD).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663601&req=5

nutrients-07-05473-f001: Sample selection process. Atopic Dermatitis (AD).
Mentions: As shown in Figure 1, at the beginning, our participants were from a population based and matched case-control study including 781 subjects who were selected by screening eligibility from 2638 preschoolers residing in middle-income areas in large cities in Korea such as Seoul and Incheon between May and July 2006 [10,23]. We assessed the child’s AD by the Korean version of ISAAC (The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood) [10,23]. Case subjects were children who had experienced AD symptoms in the form of AD diagnosis or treatment (n = 351), and controls were matched by the same preschools (n = 430), considering both age and gender. Of those 781 participants, we excluded 343 children who had no dietary intake variables (n = 179; 82 AD, 97 non-AD), energy intake less than 500 kcal or greater than 4,500 kcal (n = 15; 7 AD, 8 non-AD), modified diet by AD (n = 36; 26 AD, 10 non-AD) or other diseases (n = 8; 7 AD, 1 non-AD), or no genetic information (n = 105; 35 AD, 70 non-AD). A total of 438 (194 AD, 244 non-AD) children were included in our data analyses (Figure 1). Due to the exclusion of a large number of children, we did comparison analysis including the child’s age (5.3 vs. 5.2 years), BMI (15.4 vs. 15.5) and gender (48.3% vs. 50.3% for girls), as well as household monthly income (38.4% vs. 33.8% for greater than 4 million Korean Won, close to 4000 US $). There was no significant group difference in these variables (Supplementary Table S1).

Bottom Line: Results from the multiplicative test analyses showed that the "traditional healthy" diet on reduced AD was significant or borderline significant in the GSTM1-present group (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.54-0.92 vs.GSTM1/T1 double group).These findings demonstrate that the present type of GSTM1 may increase susceptibility to the potential effect of the "traditional healthy" diet on AD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Food & Nutrition, Research Center for Human Ecology, College of Human Ecology, Kyung Hee University, 26, Kyungheedae-ro, Hoegi-dong, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 02447, Korea. jchung@khu.ac.kr.

ABSTRACT
Previous research suggests the association of glutathione S-transferase (GST) gene polymorphisms or diet, but no interactions between these factors in atopic dermatitis (AD). We conducted a community-based case-control study including 194 AD and 244 matched non-AD preschoolers. Glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) and T1 (GSTT1) present/ genotypes were evaluated uisng a multiplex PCR method. We measured dietary intakes by a validated food frequency questionnaire and constructed three dietary patterns such as "traditional healthy", "animal foods", and "sweets" diets. In stratified analyses by GST genotypes, the "traditional healthy" diet and reduced AD showed association only in the GSTM1-present group (odd ratio (OR) 0.31, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.13-0.75). A similar pattern of the association existed in the combined GSTM1/T1 genotype that indicated the inverse association between the "traditional healthy" diet and AD in the double GSTM1/T1-present genotype group (OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.06-0.93). Results from the multiplicative test analyses showed that the "traditional healthy" diet on reduced AD was significant or borderline significant in the GSTM1-present group (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.54-0.92 vs. GSTM1- group) or the GSTM1/T1 double present group (OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.39-1.03 vs. GSTM1/T1 double group). These findings demonstrate that the present type of GSTM1 may increase susceptibility to the potential effect of the "traditional healthy" diet on AD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus