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Lentil and Kale: Complementary Nutrient-Rich Whole Food Sources to Combat Micronutrient and Calorie Malnutrition.

Migliozzi M, Thavarajah D, Thavarajah P, Smith P - Nutrients (2015)

Bottom Line: Kale (Brassica oleracea v. acephala) has been considered as a health food, but its full range of benefits and composition has not been extensively studied.Recent studies suggest that foods are enrich in prebiotic carbohydrates and dietary fiber that can potentially reduce risks of non-communicable diseases, including obesity, cancer, heart disease, and diabetes.In addition, prebiotic carbohydrate profiles and the genetic potential of these crops for further micronutrient enrichment are briefly discussed with respect to developing sustainable and nutritious food systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences, 270 Poole Agricultural Center, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634, USA. megan.migliozzi@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is a nutritious food and a staple for millions of people. Not only are lentils a good source of energy, they also contain a range of micronutrients and prebiotic carbohydrates. Kale (Brassica oleracea v. acephala) has been considered as a health food, but its full range of benefits and composition has not been extensively studied. Recent studies suggest that foods are enrich in prebiotic carbohydrates and dietary fiber that can potentially reduce risks of non-communicable diseases, including obesity, cancer, heart disease, and diabetes. Lentil and kale added to a cereal-based diet would enhance intakes of essential minerals and vitamins to combat micronutrient malnutrition. This review provides an overview of lentil and kale as a complementary nutrient-rich whole food source to combat global malnutrition and calorie issues. In addition, prebiotic carbohydrate profiles and the genetic potential of these crops for further micronutrient enrichment are briefly discussed with respect to developing sustainable and nutritious food systems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Concentrations of total prebiotic carbohydrates in a 100 g serving of different lentil cultivars grown the USA. Original data adopted from Johnson et al. (2013) [46]. Total prebiotics are the sum of sugar alcohols, raffinose oligosaccharides, fructooligosaccharides, and resistant starch. Recommendation for daily total prebiotic intake reported by Douglas and Sanders (2008) is 10–20 g per day [51].
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nutrients-07-05471-f002: Concentrations of total prebiotic carbohydrates in a 100 g serving of different lentil cultivars grown the USA. Original data adopted from Johnson et al. (2013) [46]. Total prebiotics are the sum of sugar alcohols, raffinose oligosaccharides, fructooligosaccharides, and resistant starch. Recommendation for daily total prebiotic intake reported by Douglas and Sanders (2008) is 10–20 g per day [51].

Mentions: In addition to minerals, lentils are rich in prebiotic carbohydrates including resistant starch and other non-digestible starches, providing over 13 g per 100 g serving [46]. Resistant starch is a complex carbohydrate that is not digested in the gut and instead acts as a prebiotic, being fermented by bacteria. Mean concentrations of resistant and total starch for lentils are 7.5 and 47 g 100 g−1, respectively [46]. Across 10 varieties grown in the USA, average resistant starch ranged from 6.0 g 100 g−1 in CDC Greenland to 8.9 g 100 g−1 in Pennell; total starch ranged from 45 to 48 g 100 g−1. In addition, all commercial lentil market classes evaluated were relatively high and uniform with respect to total prebiotic carbohydrate concentrations (Figure 2; [46]). Therefore, lentils offer new opportunities as a whole food to promote gastrointestinal health to reduce obesity.


Lentil and Kale: Complementary Nutrient-Rich Whole Food Sources to Combat Micronutrient and Calorie Malnutrition.

Migliozzi M, Thavarajah D, Thavarajah P, Smith P - Nutrients (2015)

Concentrations of total prebiotic carbohydrates in a 100 g serving of different lentil cultivars grown the USA. Original data adopted from Johnson et al. (2013) [46]. Total prebiotics are the sum of sugar alcohols, raffinose oligosaccharides, fructooligosaccharides, and resistant starch. Recommendation for daily total prebiotic intake reported by Douglas and Sanders (2008) is 10–20 g per day [51].
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663599&req=5

nutrients-07-05471-f002: Concentrations of total prebiotic carbohydrates in a 100 g serving of different lentil cultivars grown the USA. Original data adopted from Johnson et al. (2013) [46]. Total prebiotics are the sum of sugar alcohols, raffinose oligosaccharides, fructooligosaccharides, and resistant starch. Recommendation for daily total prebiotic intake reported by Douglas and Sanders (2008) is 10–20 g per day [51].
Mentions: In addition to minerals, lentils are rich in prebiotic carbohydrates including resistant starch and other non-digestible starches, providing over 13 g per 100 g serving [46]. Resistant starch is a complex carbohydrate that is not digested in the gut and instead acts as a prebiotic, being fermented by bacteria. Mean concentrations of resistant and total starch for lentils are 7.5 and 47 g 100 g−1, respectively [46]. Across 10 varieties grown in the USA, average resistant starch ranged from 6.0 g 100 g−1 in CDC Greenland to 8.9 g 100 g−1 in Pennell; total starch ranged from 45 to 48 g 100 g−1. In addition, all commercial lentil market classes evaluated were relatively high and uniform with respect to total prebiotic carbohydrate concentrations (Figure 2; [46]). Therefore, lentils offer new opportunities as a whole food to promote gastrointestinal health to reduce obesity.

Bottom Line: Kale (Brassica oleracea v. acephala) has been considered as a health food, but its full range of benefits and composition has not been extensively studied.Recent studies suggest that foods are enrich in prebiotic carbohydrates and dietary fiber that can potentially reduce risks of non-communicable diseases, including obesity, cancer, heart disease, and diabetes.In addition, prebiotic carbohydrate profiles and the genetic potential of these crops for further micronutrient enrichment are briefly discussed with respect to developing sustainable and nutritious food systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences, 270 Poole Agricultural Center, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634, USA. megan.migliozzi@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is a nutritious food and a staple for millions of people. Not only are lentils a good source of energy, they also contain a range of micronutrients and prebiotic carbohydrates. Kale (Brassica oleracea v. acephala) has been considered as a health food, but its full range of benefits and composition has not been extensively studied. Recent studies suggest that foods are enrich in prebiotic carbohydrates and dietary fiber that can potentially reduce risks of non-communicable diseases, including obesity, cancer, heart disease, and diabetes. Lentil and kale added to a cereal-based diet would enhance intakes of essential minerals and vitamins to combat micronutrient malnutrition. This review provides an overview of lentil and kale as a complementary nutrient-rich whole food source to combat global malnutrition and calorie issues. In addition, prebiotic carbohydrate profiles and the genetic potential of these crops for further micronutrient enrichment are briefly discussed with respect to developing sustainable and nutritious food systems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus