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Celiac Disease Genomic, Environmental, Microbiome, and Metabolomic (CDGEMM) Study Design: Approach to the Future of Personalized Prevention of Celiac Disease.

Leonard MM, Camhi S, Huedo-Medina TB, Fasano A - Nutrients (2015)

Bottom Line: Recent studies however suggest that loss of gluten tolerance can occur at any time in life as a consequence of other environmental stimuli.These include birthing delivery mode, infant feeding, and antibiotic use.Here we describe a prospective, multicenter, longitudinal study of infants at risk for CD which will employ a blend of basic and applied studies to yield fundamental insights into the role of the gut microbiome as an additional factor that may play a key role in early steps involved in the onset of autoimmune disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Celiac Research, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Boston, MA 02114, USA. mleonard7@mgh.harvard.edu.

ABSTRACT
In the past it was believed that genetic predisposition and exposure to gluten were necessary and sufficient to develop celiac disease (CD). Recent studies however suggest that loss of gluten tolerance can occur at any time in life as a consequence of other environmental stimuli. Many environmental factors known to influence the composition of the intestinal microbiota are also suggested to play a role in the development of CD. These include birthing delivery mode, infant feeding, and antibiotic use. To date no large-scale longitudinal studies have defined if and how gut microbiota composition and metabolomic profiles may influence the loss of gluten tolerance and subsequent onset of CD in genetically-susceptible individuals. Here we describe a prospective, multicenter, longitudinal study of infants at risk for CD which will employ a blend of basic and applied studies to yield fundamental insights into the role of the gut microbiome as an additional factor that may play a key role in early steps involved in the onset of autoimmune disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic overview of data and sample collection procedures involved in the Celiac Disease Genomic, Environmental, Microbiome, and Metabolomic (CDGEMM) Study.
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nutrients-07-05470-f001: Schematic overview of data and sample collection procedures involved in the Celiac Disease Genomic, Environmental, Microbiome, and Metabolomic (CDGEMM) Study.

Mentions: The CDGEMM study is a multicenter study comprised of collaborators in the United States and Italy. It is supervised by Mass General Hospital for Children at Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts (Clinical Trials identifier: NCT02061306). CDGEMM aims to study genomic, environmental, microbiome, and metabolomic factors that may contribute to the development of CD longitudinally. In addition to repeated CD serological screening until age five, detailed environmental information is obtained frequently, and stool is collected every three months for the first three years of life and every six months thereafter until age five (Figure 1). Infants’ microbiome and metabolome will be compared longitudinally paying particular attention to differences before and after the introduction of gluten, before and after the development of CD when applicable, as well as many other environmental factors. Additionally, within the longitudinal study we will perform a nested case control analysis. Infants that go on to develop CD with be matched with control infants with a genetic predisposition to, but who have not developed, CD. A second analysis will match infants who go on to develop CD with control infants who do not carry the HLA predisposing genes to address environmental factors that may contribute to alterations in the microbiome and predispose to the development of CD.


Celiac Disease Genomic, Environmental, Microbiome, and Metabolomic (CDGEMM) Study Design: Approach to the Future of Personalized Prevention of Celiac Disease.

Leonard MM, Camhi S, Huedo-Medina TB, Fasano A - Nutrients (2015)

Schematic overview of data and sample collection procedures involved in the Celiac Disease Genomic, Environmental, Microbiome, and Metabolomic (CDGEMM) Study.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663598&req=5

nutrients-07-05470-f001: Schematic overview of data and sample collection procedures involved in the Celiac Disease Genomic, Environmental, Microbiome, and Metabolomic (CDGEMM) Study.
Mentions: The CDGEMM study is a multicenter study comprised of collaborators in the United States and Italy. It is supervised by Mass General Hospital for Children at Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts (Clinical Trials identifier: NCT02061306). CDGEMM aims to study genomic, environmental, microbiome, and metabolomic factors that may contribute to the development of CD longitudinally. In addition to repeated CD serological screening until age five, detailed environmental information is obtained frequently, and stool is collected every three months for the first three years of life and every six months thereafter until age five (Figure 1). Infants’ microbiome and metabolome will be compared longitudinally paying particular attention to differences before and after the introduction of gluten, before and after the development of CD when applicable, as well as many other environmental factors. Additionally, within the longitudinal study we will perform a nested case control analysis. Infants that go on to develop CD with be matched with control infants with a genetic predisposition to, but who have not developed, CD. A second analysis will match infants who go on to develop CD with control infants who do not carry the HLA predisposing genes to address environmental factors that may contribute to alterations in the microbiome and predispose to the development of CD.

Bottom Line: Recent studies however suggest that loss of gluten tolerance can occur at any time in life as a consequence of other environmental stimuli.These include birthing delivery mode, infant feeding, and antibiotic use.Here we describe a prospective, multicenter, longitudinal study of infants at risk for CD which will employ a blend of basic and applied studies to yield fundamental insights into the role of the gut microbiome as an additional factor that may play a key role in early steps involved in the onset of autoimmune disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Celiac Research, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Boston, MA 02114, USA. mleonard7@mgh.harvard.edu.

ABSTRACT
In the past it was believed that genetic predisposition and exposure to gluten were necessary and sufficient to develop celiac disease (CD). Recent studies however suggest that loss of gluten tolerance can occur at any time in life as a consequence of other environmental stimuli. Many environmental factors known to influence the composition of the intestinal microbiota are also suggested to play a role in the development of CD. These include birthing delivery mode, infant feeding, and antibiotic use. To date no large-scale longitudinal studies have defined if and how gut microbiota composition and metabolomic profiles may influence the loss of gluten tolerance and subsequent onset of CD in genetically-susceptible individuals. Here we describe a prospective, multicenter, longitudinal study of infants at risk for CD which will employ a blend of basic and applied studies to yield fundamental insights into the role of the gut microbiome as an additional factor that may play a key role in early steps involved in the onset of autoimmune disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus