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Dietary Intakes and Nutritional Issues in Neurologically Impaired Children.

Penagini F, Mameli C, Fabiano V, Brunetti D, Dilillo D, Zuccotti GV - Nutrients (2015)

Bottom Line: Among the nutritional factors, insufficient dietary intake as a consequence of feeding difficulties is one of the main issues.Other nutritional factors are represented by excessive nutrient losses, often subsequent to gastroesophageal reflux and altered energy metabolism.Early identification and intervention of nutritional issues of NI children with a multidisciplinary approach is crucial to improve the overall health and quality of life of these complex children.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Pediatric Department, V. Buzzi Children's Hospital, University of Milan, via Castelvetro 32, 20154 Milan, Italy. Francesca.Penagini@unimi.it.

ABSTRACT
Neurologically impaired (NI) children are at increased risk of malnutrition due to several nutritional and non-nutritional factors. Among the nutritional factors, insufficient dietary intake as a consequence of feeding difficulties is one of the main issues. Feeding problems are frequently secondary to oropharyngeal dysphagia, which usually correlates with the severity of motor impairment and presents in around 90% of preschool children with cerebral palsy (CP) during the first year of life. Other nutritional factors are represented by excessive nutrient losses, often subsequent to gastroesophageal reflux and altered energy metabolism. Among the non-nutritional factors, the type and severity of neurological impairment, ambulatory status, the degree of cognitive impairment, and use of entiepileptic medication altogether concur to determination of nutritional status. With the present review, the current literature is discussed and a practical approach for nutritional assessment in NI children is proposed. Early identification and intervention of nutritional issues of NI children with a multidisciplinary approach is crucial to improve the overall health and quality of life of these complex children.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Proposed approach for nutritional assessment and intervention in NI children.
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nutrients-07-05469-f001: Proposed approach for nutritional assessment and intervention in NI children.

Mentions: Nutritional support is an essential part of the care of NI children, which have extremely complex and challenging needs. Adequate nutritional support may restore linear growth, normalize weight, decrease irritability and spasticity, improve wound healing and peripheral circulation, reduce the frequency of hospitalization, increase societal participation, hence improve overall health and quality of life. For a successful evaluation and nutritional management of NI children, a multidisciplinary approach is fundamental with the interaction of pediatric nutritionists, gastroenterologists, dietitians and neurologists. A proposed approach for nutritional assessment is illustrated in Figure 1.


Dietary Intakes and Nutritional Issues in Neurologically Impaired Children.

Penagini F, Mameli C, Fabiano V, Brunetti D, Dilillo D, Zuccotti GV - Nutrients (2015)

Proposed approach for nutritional assessment and intervention in NI children.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663597&req=5

nutrients-07-05469-f001: Proposed approach for nutritional assessment and intervention in NI children.
Mentions: Nutritional support is an essential part of the care of NI children, which have extremely complex and challenging needs. Adequate nutritional support may restore linear growth, normalize weight, decrease irritability and spasticity, improve wound healing and peripheral circulation, reduce the frequency of hospitalization, increase societal participation, hence improve overall health and quality of life. For a successful evaluation and nutritional management of NI children, a multidisciplinary approach is fundamental with the interaction of pediatric nutritionists, gastroenterologists, dietitians and neurologists. A proposed approach for nutritional assessment is illustrated in Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Among the nutritional factors, insufficient dietary intake as a consequence of feeding difficulties is one of the main issues.Other nutritional factors are represented by excessive nutrient losses, often subsequent to gastroesophageal reflux and altered energy metabolism.Early identification and intervention of nutritional issues of NI children with a multidisciplinary approach is crucial to improve the overall health and quality of life of these complex children.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Pediatric Department, V. Buzzi Children's Hospital, University of Milan, via Castelvetro 32, 20154 Milan, Italy. Francesca.Penagini@unimi.it.

ABSTRACT
Neurologically impaired (NI) children are at increased risk of malnutrition due to several nutritional and non-nutritional factors. Among the nutritional factors, insufficient dietary intake as a consequence of feeding difficulties is one of the main issues. Feeding problems are frequently secondary to oropharyngeal dysphagia, which usually correlates with the severity of motor impairment and presents in around 90% of preschool children with cerebral palsy (CP) during the first year of life. Other nutritional factors are represented by excessive nutrient losses, often subsequent to gastroesophageal reflux and altered energy metabolism. Among the non-nutritional factors, the type and severity of neurological impairment, ambulatory status, the degree of cognitive impairment, and use of entiepileptic medication altogether concur to determination of nutritional status. With the present review, the current literature is discussed and a practical approach for nutritional assessment in NI children is proposed. Early identification and intervention of nutritional issues of NI children with a multidisciplinary approach is crucial to improve the overall health and quality of life of these complex children.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus