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A Multi-Center Assessment of Nutrient Levels and Foods Provided by Hospital Patient Menus.

Trang S, Fraser J, Wilkinson L, Steckham K, Oliphant H, Fletcher H, Tzianetas R, Arcand J - Nutrients (2015)

Bottom Line: Protein ranged from 49 to 159 g (0.9-1.1 g/kg/day).Compared to CFG recommended servings, 35% met vegetables and fruit and milk and alternatives, 11% met grain products and 8% met meat and alternatives.These data support the need for frequent monitoring and evaluation of menus, food procurement and menu planning policies and for sufficient resources to ensure menu quality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, 150 College Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3E2, Canada. susan.trang@mail.utoronto.ca.

ABSTRACT
Diets of high nutritional quality can aid in the prevention and management of malnutrition in hospitalized patients. This study evaluated the nutritional quality of hospital patient menus. At three large acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada, 84 standard menus were evaluated, which included regular and carbohydrate-controlled diets and 3000 mg and 2000 mg sodium diets. Mean levels of calories, macronutrients and vitamins and minerals provided were calculated. Comparisons were made with the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI) and Canada's Food Guide (CFG) recommendations. Calorie levels ranged from 1281 to 3007 kcal, with 45% of menus below 1600 kcal. Protein ranged from 49 to 159 g (0.9-1.1 g/kg/day). Energy and protein levels were highest in carbohydrate-controlled menus. All regular and carbohydrate-controlled menus provided macronutrients within the Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Ranges. The proportion of regular diet menus meeting the DRIs: 0% for fiber; 7% for calcium; 57% for vitamin C; and 100% for iron. Compared to CFG recommended servings, 35% met vegetables and fruit and milk and alternatives, 11% met grain products and 8% met meat and alternatives. These data support the need for frequent monitoring and evaluation of menus, food procurement and menu planning policies and for sufficient resources to ensure menu quality.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentage of standard hospital menus not meeting Canada’s Food Guide recommended number of servings.
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nutrients-07-05466-f001: Percentage of standard hospital menus not meeting Canada’s Food Guide recommended number of servings.

Mentions: There was a large variation in the number of CFG servings provided by the menus. For example, regular menus provided 3.4–8.2 servings of vegetables and fruit (mean 5.9 ± 1.2 servings), 2.3–6.7 servings of grain products (mean 4.6 ± 1.2 servings), 1.1–2.9 servings of milk and alternatives (mean 2.1 ± 0.5 servings) and 0.4–2.9 servings of meat and alternatives (mean 1.7 ± 0.5 servings) (Table 2). Across all diets, only 8% met the recommended number of meat and alternatives; 11% met the recommended number of grain products; and 35% met the recommend number of vegetables and fruit servings and milk and alternative servings (Table 2, Figure 1).


A Multi-Center Assessment of Nutrient Levels and Foods Provided by Hospital Patient Menus.

Trang S, Fraser J, Wilkinson L, Steckham K, Oliphant H, Fletcher H, Tzianetas R, Arcand J - Nutrients (2015)

Percentage of standard hospital menus not meeting Canada’s Food Guide recommended number of servings.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663594&req=5

nutrients-07-05466-f001: Percentage of standard hospital menus not meeting Canada’s Food Guide recommended number of servings.
Mentions: There was a large variation in the number of CFG servings provided by the menus. For example, regular menus provided 3.4–8.2 servings of vegetables and fruit (mean 5.9 ± 1.2 servings), 2.3–6.7 servings of grain products (mean 4.6 ± 1.2 servings), 1.1–2.9 servings of milk and alternatives (mean 2.1 ± 0.5 servings) and 0.4–2.9 servings of meat and alternatives (mean 1.7 ± 0.5 servings) (Table 2). Across all diets, only 8% met the recommended number of meat and alternatives; 11% met the recommended number of grain products; and 35% met the recommend number of vegetables and fruit servings and milk and alternative servings (Table 2, Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Protein ranged from 49 to 159 g (0.9-1.1 g/kg/day).Compared to CFG recommended servings, 35% met vegetables and fruit and milk and alternatives, 11% met grain products and 8% met meat and alternatives.These data support the need for frequent monitoring and evaluation of menus, food procurement and menu planning policies and for sufficient resources to ensure menu quality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, 150 College Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3E2, Canada. susan.trang@mail.utoronto.ca.

ABSTRACT
Diets of high nutritional quality can aid in the prevention and management of malnutrition in hospitalized patients. This study evaluated the nutritional quality of hospital patient menus. At three large acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada, 84 standard menus were evaluated, which included regular and carbohydrate-controlled diets and 3000 mg and 2000 mg sodium diets. Mean levels of calories, macronutrients and vitamins and minerals provided were calculated. Comparisons were made with the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI) and Canada's Food Guide (CFG) recommendations. Calorie levels ranged from 1281 to 3007 kcal, with 45% of menus below 1600 kcal. Protein ranged from 49 to 159 g (0.9-1.1 g/kg/day). Energy and protein levels were highest in carbohydrate-controlled menus. All regular and carbohydrate-controlled menus provided macronutrients within the Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Ranges. The proportion of regular diet menus meeting the DRIs: 0% for fiber; 7% for calcium; 57% for vitamin C; and 100% for iron. Compared to CFG recommended servings, 35% met vegetables and fruit and milk and alternatives, 11% met grain products and 8% met meat and alternatives. These data support the need for frequent monitoring and evaluation of menus, food procurement and menu planning policies and for sufficient resources to ensure menu quality.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus