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Association of Dietary Vitamin A and β-Carotene Intake with the Risk of Lung Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of 19 Publications.

Yu N, Su X, Wang Z, Dai B, Kang J - Nutrients (2015)

Bottom Line: We used the random-effect model to estimate the relative risk (RR) and their 95% CI.Small-study effect was assessed using Egger's test.In conclusions, higher category of dietary β-carotene and vitamin A intakes could reduce the risk of lung cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Hospital of China Medical University, No.155 Nanjing North Street, He-ping District, Shenyang 110001, Liaoning, China. nayu888@yeah.net.

ABSTRACT
Whether dietary β-carotene and vitamin A intake protect against lung cancer risk is not clear. Therefore, we performed this meta-analysis to investigate the association between them. The related articles were searched using the databases PubMed and the Web of Knowledge up to May 2015. We used the random-effect model to estimate the relative risk (RR) and their 95% CI. Small-study effect was assessed using Egger's test. In total, 19 studies comprising 10,261 lung cancer cases met the inclusion criteria. The pooled RR and their 95% CI was 0.855 (0.739-0.989) for higher category of dietary vitamin A intake and lung cancer risk, especially among Asian populations and in the cohort studies. Evidence from 18 studies suggested that higher category of dietary β-carotene intake could reduce lung cancer risk (0.768 (0.675-0.874)).The associations were also significant in American and Asian populations. In conclusions, higher category of dietary β-carotene and vitamin A intakes could reduce the risk of lung cancer. However, the dose-response analysis was not performed due to the limited data in each individual study. Due to this limitation, further studies with detailed dose, cases and person-years for β-carotene and vitamin A of each category are wanted to assess this dose-response association.

No MeSH data available.


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The multivariate-adjusted risk of lung cancer for the highest versus lowest categories of vitamin A intake.
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nutrients-07-05463-f002: The multivariate-adjusted risk of lung cancer for the highest versus lowest categories of vitamin A intake.

Mentions: Ten articles [10,11,12,13,19,20,21,22,32,33] with 11 studies including 6139 lung cancer cases reported the association between dietary and lung cancer risk. Inverse association was reported in four studies, while seven studies did not find positive results. In our study, we concluded that dietary vitamin A intake could reduce lung cancer risk (summary RR = 0.855, 95% CI = 0.739–0.989, I2 = 60.5%) (Figure 2). In the subgroup analysis of study design, the combined RR with their 95% CI were 0.869 (0.758–0.980) and 0.754 (0.560–1.016) for prospective studies and case-control studies, respectively. When we stratified studies by geographic locations, we found an inverse association between dietary vitamin A intake and lung cancer risk among Asian populations (summary RR = 0.682, 95% CI = 0.556–0.837), but not in the American populations. The subgroup analysis by sex was also performed, and the association was significant only in males (summary RR = 0.697, 95% CI = 0.553–0.879). Table 2 showed the detailed results.


Association of Dietary Vitamin A and β-Carotene Intake with the Risk of Lung Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of 19 Publications.

Yu N, Su X, Wang Z, Dai B, Kang J - Nutrients (2015)

The multivariate-adjusted risk of lung cancer for the highest versus lowest categories of vitamin A intake.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663591&req=5

nutrients-07-05463-f002: The multivariate-adjusted risk of lung cancer for the highest versus lowest categories of vitamin A intake.
Mentions: Ten articles [10,11,12,13,19,20,21,22,32,33] with 11 studies including 6139 lung cancer cases reported the association between dietary and lung cancer risk. Inverse association was reported in four studies, while seven studies did not find positive results. In our study, we concluded that dietary vitamin A intake could reduce lung cancer risk (summary RR = 0.855, 95% CI = 0.739–0.989, I2 = 60.5%) (Figure 2). In the subgroup analysis of study design, the combined RR with their 95% CI were 0.869 (0.758–0.980) and 0.754 (0.560–1.016) for prospective studies and case-control studies, respectively. When we stratified studies by geographic locations, we found an inverse association between dietary vitamin A intake and lung cancer risk among Asian populations (summary RR = 0.682, 95% CI = 0.556–0.837), but not in the American populations. The subgroup analysis by sex was also performed, and the association was significant only in males (summary RR = 0.697, 95% CI = 0.553–0.879). Table 2 showed the detailed results.

Bottom Line: We used the random-effect model to estimate the relative risk (RR) and their 95% CI.Small-study effect was assessed using Egger's test.In conclusions, higher category of dietary β-carotene and vitamin A intakes could reduce the risk of lung cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Hospital of China Medical University, No.155 Nanjing North Street, He-ping District, Shenyang 110001, Liaoning, China. nayu888@yeah.net.

ABSTRACT
Whether dietary β-carotene and vitamin A intake protect against lung cancer risk is not clear. Therefore, we performed this meta-analysis to investigate the association between them. The related articles were searched using the databases PubMed and the Web of Knowledge up to May 2015. We used the random-effect model to estimate the relative risk (RR) and their 95% CI. Small-study effect was assessed using Egger's test. In total, 19 studies comprising 10,261 lung cancer cases met the inclusion criteria. The pooled RR and their 95% CI was 0.855 (0.739-0.989) for higher category of dietary vitamin A intake and lung cancer risk, especially among Asian populations and in the cohort studies. Evidence from 18 studies suggested that higher category of dietary β-carotene intake could reduce lung cancer risk (0.768 (0.675-0.874)).The associations were also significant in American and Asian populations. In conclusions, higher category of dietary β-carotene and vitamin A intakes could reduce the risk of lung cancer. However, the dose-response analysis was not performed due to the limited data in each individual study. Due to this limitation, further studies with detailed dose, cases and person-years for β-carotene and vitamin A of each category are wanted to assess this dose-response association.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus