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Diet, Microbiota and Immune System in Type 1 Diabetes Development and Evolution.

Mejía-León ME, Barca AM - Nutrients (2015)

Bottom Line: Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is the second most frequent autoimmune disease in childhood.T1D development involves genetic and environmental factors, such as birth delivery mode, use of antibiotics, and diet.The molecular mechanisms involved will also be addressed, and finally, evidence-based strategies for potential primary and secondary prevention of T1D will be discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department Nutrición y Metabolismo, Centro de Investigación en Alimentación y Desarrollo, A.C., Carr. La Victoria, Km. 0.6, Hermosillo, Sonora 83304, Mexico. esther.mejia83@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is the second most frequent autoimmune disease in childhood. The long-term micro- and macro-vascular complications of diabetes are associated with the leading causes of disability and even mortality in young adults. Understanding the T1D etiology will allow the design of preventive strategies to avoid or delay the T1D onset and to help to maintain control after developing. T1D development involves genetic and environmental factors, such as birth delivery mode, use of antibiotics, and diet. Gut microbiota could be the link between environmental factors, the development of autoimmunity, and T1D. In this review, we will focus on the dietary factor and its relationship with the gut microbiota in the complex process involved in autoimmunity and T1D. The molecular mechanisms involved will also be addressed, and finally, evidence-based strategies for potential primary and secondary prevention of T1D will be discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Diet and microbiota associated mechanisms in autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes (T1D) development.
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nutrients-07-05461-f001: Diet and microbiota associated mechanisms in autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes (T1D) development.

Mentions: The lactate model appears to be the strongest possible explanation for understanding the link between T1D and dysbiosis (Figure 1). According to this model, the presence of lactic acid- and butyrate-producing bacteria such as Prevotella and Akkermansia helps to maintain a healthy epithelium. This is because butyrate contributes to mucin synthesis and to the assembly of tight junctions [53]. These bacteria were common in the microbiota of healthy children around the world [9,10,11,12,15,50]. In contrast, when microorganisms such as Bacteroides and Veillonella are harbored in abundance, this substrate follows the pathway to succinate, acetate, and propionate. These products compromise mucin synthesis and increase paracellular permeability by altering the tight junctions [50].


Diet, Microbiota and Immune System in Type 1 Diabetes Development and Evolution.

Mejía-León ME, Barca AM - Nutrients (2015)

Diet and microbiota associated mechanisms in autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes (T1D) development.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663589&req=5

nutrients-07-05461-f001: Diet and microbiota associated mechanisms in autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes (T1D) development.
Mentions: The lactate model appears to be the strongest possible explanation for understanding the link between T1D and dysbiosis (Figure 1). According to this model, the presence of lactic acid- and butyrate-producing bacteria such as Prevotella and Akkermansia helps to maintain a healthy epithelium. This is because butyrate contributes to mucin synthesis and to the assembly of tight junctions [53]. These bacteria were common in the microbiota of healthy children around the world [9,10,11,12,15,50]. In contrast, when microorganisms such as Bacteroides and Veillonella are harbored in abundance, this substrate follows the pathway to succinate, acetate, and propionate. These products compromise mucin synthesis and increase paracellular permeability by altering the tight junctions [50].

Bottom Line: Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is the second most frequent autoimmune disease in childhood.T1D development involves genetic and environmental factors, such as birth delivery mode, use of antibiotics, and diet.The molecular mechanisms involved will also be addressed, and finally, evidence-based strategies for potential primary and secondary prevention of T1D will be discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department Nutrición y Metabolismo, Centro de Investigación en Alimentación y Desarrollo, A.C., Carr. La Victoria, Km. 0.6, Hermosillo, Sonora 83304, Mexico. esther.mejia83@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is the second most frequent autoimmune disease in childhood. The long-term micro- and macro-vascular complications of diabetes are associated with the leading causes of disability and even mortality in young adults. Understanding the T1D etiology will allow the design of preventive strategies to avoid or delay the T1D onset and to help to maintain control after developing. T1D development involves genetic and environmental factors, such as birth delivery mode, use of antibiotics, and diet. Gut microbiota could be the link between environmental factors, the development of autoimmunity, and T1D. In this review, we will focus on the dietary factor and its relationship with the gut microbiota in the complex process involved in autoimmunity and T1D. The molecular mechanisms involved will also be addressed, and finally, evidence-based strategies for potential primary and secondary prevention of T1D will be discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus