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Iron Metabolism Dysregulation and Cognitive Dysfunction in Pediatric Obesity: Is There a Connection?

Grandone A, Marzuillo P, Perrone L, Del Giudice EM - Nutrients (2015)

Bottom Line: In children both conditions deserve particular attention.Several studies revealed an association between obesity and iron deficiency in children and, in some cases, a reduced response to oral supplementation.The connecting mechanism, however, is not completely known.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Woman, Child, General and Specialized Surgery, Second University of Naples Via De Crecchio 2-4, Naples 80138, Italy. agrandone@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Obesity and iron deficiency (ID) are two of the most common nutritional disorders in the world. In children both conditions deserve particular attention. Several studies revealed an association between obesity and iron deficiency in children and, in some cases, a reduced response to oral supplementation. The connecting mechanism, however, is not completely known. This review is focused on: (1) iron deficiency in obese children and the role of hepcidin in the connection between body fat and poor iron status; (2) iron status and consequences on health, in particular on cognitive function; (3) cognitive function and obesity; (4) suggestion of a possible link between cognitive dysfunction and ID in pediatric obesity; and implications for therapy and future research.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The role of hepcidin in the connection between adiposity and poor iron status.
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nutrients-07-05458-f002: The role of hepcidin in the connection between adiposity and poor iron status.

Mentions: The chronic low-grade inflammation typical of the obesity leads to inflammatory cytokines production with consequent stimulation of hepatic hepcidin production. Also the adipose tissue appears to produce minor levels of hepcidin. Then, hepcidin acts on the enterocytes resulting in reduced iron absorption, and on splenic and hepatic macrophages resulting in less iron release and increased iron stores (red arrows stimulation, blue arrows inhibition) (Figure 2).


Iron Metabolism Dysregulation and Cognitive Dysfunction in Pediatric Obesity: Is There a Connection?

Grandone A, Marzuillo P, Perrone L, Del Giudice EM - Nutrients (2015)

The role of hepcidin in the connection between adiposity and poor iron status.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663586&req=5

nutrients-07-05458-f002: The role of hepcidin in the connection between adiposity and poor iron status.
Mentions: The chronic low-grade inflammation typical of the obesity leads to inflammatory cytokines production with consequent stimulation of hepatic hepcidin production. Also the adipose tissue appears to produce minor levels of hepcidin. Then, hepcidin acts on the enterocytes resulting in reduced iron absorption, and on splenic and hepatic macrophages resulting in less iron release and increased iron stores (red arrows stimulation, blue arrows inhibition) (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: In children both conditions deserve particular attention.Several studies revealed an association between obesity and iron deficiency in children and, in some cases, a reduced response to oral supplementation.The connecting mechanism, however, is not completely known.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Woman, Child, General and Specialized Surgery, Second University of Naples Via De Crecchio 2-4, Naples 80138, Italy. agrandone@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Obesity and iron deficiency (ID) are two of the most common nutritional disorders in the world. In children both conditions deserve particular attention. Several studies revealed an association between obesity and iron deficiency in children and, in some cases, a reduced response to oral supplementation. The connecting mechanism, however, is not completely known. This review is focused on: (1) iron deficiency in obese children and the role of hepcidin in the connection between body fat and poor iron status; (2) iron status and consequences on health, in particular on cognitive function; (3) cognitive function and obesity; (4) suggestion of a possible link between cognitive dysfunction and ID in pediatric obesity; and implications for therapy and future research.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus