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Iron Metabolism Dysregulation and Cognitive Dysfunction in Pediatric Obesity: Is There a Connection?

Grandone A, Marzuillo P, Perrone L, Del Giudice EM - Nutrients (2015)

Bottom Line: In children both conditions deserve particular attention.Several studies revealed an association between obesity and iron deficiency in children and, in some cases, a reduced response to oral supplementation.The connecting mechanism, however, is not completely known.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Woman, Child, General and Specialized Surgery, Second University of Naples Via De Crecchio 2-4, Naples 80138, Italy. agrandone@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Obesity and iron deficiency (ID) are two of the most common nutritional disorders in the world. In children both conditions deserve particular attention. Several studies revealed an association between obesity and iron deficiency in children and, in some cases, a reduced response to oral supplementation. The connecting mechanism, however, is not completely known. This review is focused on: (1) iron deficiency in obese children and the role of hepcidin in the connection between body fat and poor iron status; (2) iron status and consequences on health, in particular on cognitive function; (3) cognitive function and obesity; (4) suggestion of a possible link between cognitive dysfunction and ID in pediatric obesity; and implications for therapy and future research.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Iron requirements (mg/day) from 6 months to 18 years (data from Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine, National Academies).
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nutrients-07-05458-f001: Iron requirements (mg/day) from 6 months to 18 years (data from Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine, National Academies).

Mentions: Children, and in particular infants and adolescents, are a population at risk to develop iron deficiency, probably due to the increased demand (Figure 1). The iron requirement is reduced from sixth months to three years. Then, it gradually increases reaching the max values during pubertal development. The first report of potential connection between iron status and obesity appeared over 40 years ago [9]. This report described lower serum iron concentrations in obese adolescents compared to normal weight controls. Since then many other studies have reported that obese children, and in particular adolescents, are at risk for ID both from the US and transition countries [10,11,12,13].


Iron Metabolism Dysregulation and Cognitive Dysfunction in Pediatric Obesity: Is There a Connection?

Grandone A, Marzuillo P, Perrone L, Del Giudice EM - Nutrients (2015)

Iron requirements (mg/day) from 6 months to 18 years (data from Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine, National Academies).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663586&req=5

nutrients-07-05458-f001: Iron requirements (mg/day) from 6 months to 18 years (data from Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine, National Academies).
Mentions: Children, and in particular infants and adolescents, are a population at risk to develop iron deficiency, probably due to the increased demand (Figure 1). The iron requirement is reduced from sixth months to three years. Then, it gradually increases reaching the max values during pubertal development. The first report of potential connection between iron status and obesity appeared over 40 years ago [9]. This report described lower serum iron concentrations in obese adolescents compared to normal weight controls. Since then many other studies have reported that obese children, and in particular adolescents, are at risk for ID both from the US and transition countries [10,11,12,13].

Bottom Line: In children both conditions deserve particular attention.Several studies revealed an association between obesity and iron deficiency in children and, in some cases, a reduced response to oral supplementation.The connecting mechanism, however, is not completely known.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Woman, Child, General and Specialized Surgery, Second University of Naples Via De Crecchio 2-4, Naples 80138, Italy. agrandone@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Obesity and iron deficiency (ID) are two of the most common nutritional disorders in the world. In children both conditions deserve particular attention. Several studies revealed an association between obesity and iron deficiency in children and, in some cases, a reduced response to oral supplementation. The connecting mechanism, however, is not completely known. This review is focused on: (1) iron deficiency in obese children and the role of hepcidin in the connection between body fat and poor iron status; (2) iron status and consequences on health, in particular on cognitive function; (3) cognitive function and obesity; (4) suggestion of a possible link between cognitive dysfunction and ID in pediatric obesity; and implications for therapy and future research.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus