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Interactions between Carotenoids from Marine Bacteria and Other Micronutrients: Impact on Stability and Antioxidant Activity.

Sy C, Dangles O, Borel P, Caris-Veyrat C - Mar Drugs (2015)

Bottom Line: For comparison, β-carotene and lycopene in combination were shown to exhibit a slightly higher stability toward iron-induced autoxidation, as well as an additive antioxidant activity as compared to the carotenoids, individually.Synergism could arise from antioxidants interacting via electron transfer through the porphyrin nucleus of heme iron.Overall, combining antioxidants acting via complementary mechanisms could be the key for optimizing the activity of this bacterial carotenoid cocktail.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: INRA, UMR408 SQPOV, F-84000 Avignon, France. sy_charlotte@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Recently isolated spore-forming pigmented marine bacteria Bacillus indicus HU36 are sources of oxygenated carotenoids with original structures (about fifteen distinct yellow and orange pigments with acylated d-glucosyl groups). In this study, we evaluated the stability (sensitivity to iron-induced autoxidation) and antioxidant activity (inhibition of iron-induced lipid peroxidation) of combinations of bacterial HU36 carotenoids with the bacterial vitamin menaquinone MQ-7 and with phenolic antioxidants (vitamin E, chlorogenic acid, rutin). Unexpectedly, MQ-7 strongly improves the ability of HU36 carotenoids to inhibit Fe(II)-induced lipid peroxidation, although MQ-7 was not consumed in the medium. We propose that their interaction modifies the carotenoid antioxidant mechanism(s), possibly by allowing carotenoids to scavenge the initiating radicals. For comparison, β-carotene and lycopene in combination were shown to exhibit a slightly higher stability toward iron-induced autoxidation, as well as an additive antioxidant activity as compared to the carotenoids, individually. HU36 carotenoids and phenolic antioxidants displayed synergistic activities in the inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation induced by heme iron, but not by free iron. Synergism could arise from antioxidants interacting via electron transfer through the porphyrin nucleus of heme iron. Overall, combining antioxidants acting via complementary mechanisms could be the key for optimizing the activity of this bacterial carotenoid cocktail.

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Kinetic monitoring of conjugated diene (CD) accumulation during linoleic acid peroxidation inhibited by lycopene (2 μmol·L−1) and lycopene + menaquinone (MQ-7, 20 μmol·L−1). Initiation by (A) 0.5 μmol·L−1 MbFeIII, pH 5.8; (B) 0.5 μmol·L−1 MbFeIII, pH 4 and (C) 20 μmol·L−1 FeII, pH 4.
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marinedrugs-13-07020-f003: Kinetic monitoring of conjugated diene (CD) accumulation during linoleic acid peroxidation inhibited by lycopene (2 μmol·L−1) and lycopene + menaquinone (MQ-7, 20 μmol·L−1). Initiation by (A) 0.5 μmol·L−1 MbFeIII, pH 5.8; (B) 0.5 μmol·L−1 MbFeIII, pH 4 and (C) 20 μmol·L−1 FeII, pH 4.

Mentions: Influence of MQ-7 on the antioxidant activity of lycopene. Lycopene is a potent inhibitor of linoleic acid peroxidation initiated by FeII or MbFeIII [29]. The delays of linoleic acid peroxidation induced by 2 μmol·L−1 lycopene with and without MQ-7 (10 equiv.) were compared. The molar ratio of MQ-7/lycopene was in the same range as that of MQ-7/carotenoid in the crude HU36 extract. When lycopene and MQ-7 were combined, the delay in linoleic acid peroxidation was three times (Figure 3A), 1.6 times (Figure 3B), and 1.3 times (Figure 3C) higher than lycopene alone, with an initiator of MbFeIII at pH 5.8, MbFeIII at pH 4, and FeII at pH 4, respectively. Thus, the effect of MQ-7 on lycopene activity was maximal with MbFeIII at pH 5.8 and minimal with FeII at pH 4, in sharp contrast with the HU36 carotenoids.


Interactions between Carotenoids from Marine Bacteria and Other Micronutrients: Impact on Stability and Antioxidant Activity.

Sy C, Dangles O, Borel P, Caris-Veyrat C - Mar Drugs (2015)

Kinetic monitoring of conjugated diene (CD) accumulation during linoleic acid peroxidation inhibited by lycopene (2 μmol·L−1) and lycopene + menaquinone (MQ-7, 20 μmol·L−1). Initiation by (A) 0.5 μmol·L−1 MbFeIII, pH 5.8; (B) 0.5 μmol·L−1 MbFeIII, pH 4 and (C) 20 μmol·L−1 FeII, pH 4.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663564&req=5

marinedrugs-13-07020-f003: Kinetic monitoring of conjugated diene (CD) accumulation during linoleic acid peroxidation inhibited by lycopene (2 μmol·L−1) and lycopene + menaquinone (MQ-7, 20 μmol·L−1). Initiation by (A) 0.5 μmol·L−1 MbFeIII, pH 5.8; (B) 0.5 μmol·L−1 MbFeIII, pH 4 and (C) 20 μmol·L−1 FeII, pH 4.
Mentions: Influence of MQ-7 on the antioxidant activity of lycopene. Lycopene is a potent inhibitor of linoleic acid peroxidation initiated by FeII or MbFeIII [29]. The delays of linoleic acid peroxidation induced by 2 μmol·L−1 lycopene with and without MQ-7 (10 equiv.) were compared. The molar ratio of MQ-7/lycopene was in the same range as that of MQ-7/carotenoid in the crude HU36 extract. When lycopene and MQ-7 were combined, the delay in linoleic acid peroxidation was three times (Figure 3A), 1.6 times (Figure 3B), and 1.3 times (Figure 3C) higher than lycopene alone, with an initiator of MbFeIII at pH 5.8, MbFeIII at pH 4, and FeII at pH 4, respectively. Thus, the effect of MQ-7 on lycopene activity was maximal with MbFeIII at pH 5.8 and minimal with FeII at pH 4, in sharp contrast with the HU36 carotenoids.

Bottom Line: For comparison, β-carotene and lycopene in combination were shown to exhibit a slightly higher stability toward iron-induced autoxidation, as well as an additive antioxidant activity as compared to the carotenoids, individually.Synergism could arise from antioxidants interacting via electron transfer through the porphyrin nucleus of heme iron.Overall, combining antioxidants acting via complementary mechanisms could be the key for optimizing the activity of this bacterial carotenoid cocktail.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: INRA, UMR408 SQPOV, F-84000 Avignon, France. sy_charlotte@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Recently isolated spore-forming pigmented marine bacteria Bacillus indicus HU36 are sources of oxygenated carotenoids with original structures (about fifteen distinct yellow and orange pigments with acylated d-glucosyl groups). In this study, we evaluated the stability (sensitivity to iron-induced autoxidation) and antioxidant activity (inhibition of iron-induced lipid peroxidation) of combinations of bacterial HU36 carotenoids with the bacterial vitamin menaquinone MQ-7 and with phenolic antioxidants (vitamin E, chlorogenic acid, rutin). Unexpectedly, MQ-7 strongly improves the ability of HU36 carotenoids to inhibit Fe(II)-induced lipid peroxidation, although MQ-7 was not consumed in the medium. We propose that their interaction modifies the carotenoid antioxidant mechanism(s), possibly by allowing carotenoids to scavenge the initiating radicals. For comparison, β-carotene and lycopene in combination were shown to exhibit a slightly higher stability toward iron-induced autoxidation, as well as an additive antioxidant activity as compared to the carotenoids, individually. HU36 carotenoids and phenolic antioxidants displayed synergistic activities in the inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation induced by heme iron, but not by free iron. Synergism could arise from antioxidants interacting via electron transfer through the porphyrin nucleus of heme iron. Overall, combining antioxidants acting via complementary mechanisms could be the key for optimizing the activity of this bacterial carotenoid cocktail.

Show MeSH