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Cyanobactins from Cyanobacteria: Current Genetic and Chemical State of Knowledge.

Martins J, Vasconcelos V - Mar Drugs (2015)

Bottom Line: Apart from non-ribosomal peptides and polyketides, ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are one of the leading groups of bioactive compounds produced by cyanobacteria.It is assumed that the primary source of cyanobactins is cyanobacteria, although these compounds have also been isolated from marine animals such as ascidians, sponges and mollusks.The aim of this review is to update the current knowledge of cyanobactins, recognized as being produced by cyanobacteria, and to emphasize their genetic clusters and chemical structures as well as their bioactivities, ecological roles and biotechnological potential.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Sciences, University of Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, Porto 4169-007, Portugal. joana.o.martins@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Cyanobacteria are considered to be one of the most promising sources of new, natural products. Apart from non-ribosomal peptides and polyketides, ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are one of the leading groups of bioactive compounds produced by cyanobacteria. Among these, cyanobactins have sparked attention due to their interesting bioactivities and for their potential to be prospective candidates in the development of drugs. It is assumed that the primary source of cyanobactins is cyanobacteria, although these compounds have also been isolated from marine animals such as ascidians, sponges and mollusks. The aim of this review is to update the current knowledge of cyanobactins, recognized as being produced by cyanobacteria, and to emphasize their genetic clusters and chemical structures as well as their bioactivities, ecological roles and biotechnological potential.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Linear cyanobactins. The genes are identified by different colors. Prenylated N-termini (pale red) and methylated C-termini bound to thiazoles are highlighted in the chemical structures.
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marinedrugs-13-06910-f004: Linear cyanobactins. The genes are identified by different colors. Prenylated N-termini (pale red) and methylated C-termini bound to thiazoles are highlighted in the chemical structures.

Mentions: In 2013, the genome mining of 126 cyanobacterial strains, led to the discovery of linear cyanobactins by Leikoski and colleagues [11]. The cyanobactin genetic clusters of M. aeruginosa PCC 9432 (~12.4 kb), Oscillatoria nigro-viridis PCC 7112 (~13 kb) and Leptolyngbya sp. PCC 7376 (~11.3 kb) (Figure 4), encode an unusual bimodular protein with homology to SAM-dependent methyltransferases and prenyltransferases, thereby indicating that a new cyanobactin variety could arise as an end product. However, in Leptolyngbya sp. PCC 7376, the cyanobactins could not be predicted since the identified precursors lacked the recognizable cleavage sites. The bioinformatics study predicted the presence of the linear cyanobactins in M. aeruginosa PCC 9432 and O. nigro-viridis PCC 7112 due to the presence of conserved cleavage sites. The tetrapeptide aeruginosamide B and the pentapeptide aeruginosamide C were detected in M. aeruginosa PCC 9432. A similar cytotoxic compound, named aeruginosamide, was previously reported from a M. aeruginosa bloom [26]. Both aeruginosamide B and C present a prenylated N-termini and a methylated C-termini bound to thiazole. In O. nigro-viridis PCC 7112, the linear tripeptide viridisamide A was identified. As in aeruginosamides B and C, viridisamide A contains a prenylated N-termini and a C-termini bound to thiazole [11].


Cyanobactins from Cyanobacteria: Current Genetic and Chemical State of Knowledge.

Martins J, Vasconcelos V - Mar Drugs (2015)

Linear cyanobactins. The genes are identified by different colors. Prenylated N-termini (pale red) and methylated C-termini bound to thiazoles are highlighted in the chemical structures.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663559&req=5

marinedrugs-13-06910-f004: Linear cyanobactins. The genes are identified by different colors. Prenylated N-termini (pale red) and methylated C-termini bound to thiazoles are highlighted in the chemical structures.
Mentions: In 2013, the genome mining of 126 cyanobacterial strains, led to the discovery of linear cyanobactins by Leikoski and colleagues [11]. The cyanobactin genetic clusters of M. aeruginosa PCC 9432 (~12.4 kb), Oscillatoria nigro-viridis PCC 7112 (~13 kb) and Leptolyngbya sp. PCC 7376 (~11.3 kb) (Figure 4), encode an unusual bimodular protein with homology to SAM-dependent methyltransferases and prenyltransferases, thereby indicating that a new cyanobactin variety could arise as an end product. However, in Leptolyngbya sp. PCC 7376, the cyanobactins could not be predicted since the identified precursors lacked the recognizable cleavage sites. The bioinformatics study predicted the presence of the linear cyanobactins in M. aeruginosa PCC 9432 and O. nigro-viridis PCC 7112 due to the presence of conserved cleavage sites. The tetrapeptide aeruginosamide B and the pentapeptide aeruginosamide C were detected in M. aeruginosa PCC 9432. A similar cytotoxic compound, named aeruginosamide, was previously reported from a M. aeruginosa bloom [26]. Both aeruginosamide B and C present a prenylated N-termini and a methylated C-termini bound to thiazole. In O. nigro-viridis PCC 7112, the linear tripeptide viridisamide A was identified. As in aeruginosamides B and C, viridisamide A contains a prenylated N-termini and a C-termini bound to thiazole [11].

Bottom Line: Apart from non-ribosomal peptides and polyketides, ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are one of the leading groups of bioactive compounds produced by cyanobacteria.It is assumed that the primary source of cyanobactins is cyanobacteria, although these compounds have also been isolated from marine animals such as ascidians, sponges and mollusks.The aim of this review is to update the current knowledge of cyanobactins, recognized as being produced by cyanobacteria, and to emphasize their genetic clusters and chemical structures as well as their bioactivities, ecological roles and biotechnological potential.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Sciences, University of Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, Porto 4169-007, Portugal. joana.o.martins@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Cyanobacteria are considered to be one of the most promising sources of new, natural products. Apart from non-ribosomal peptides and polyketides, ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are one of the leading groups of bioactive compounds produced by cyanobacteria. Among these, cyanobactins have sparked attention due to their interesting bioactivities and for their potential to be prospective candidates in the development of drugs. It is assumed that the primary source of cyanobactins is cyanobacteria, although these compounds have also been isolated from marine animals such as ascidians, sponges and mollusks. The aim of this review is to update the current knowledge of cyanobactins, recognized as being produced by cyanobacteria, and to emphasize their genetic clusters and chemical structures as well as their bioactivities, ecological roles and biotechnological potential.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus