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Cyanobactins from Cyanobacteria: Current Genetic and Chemical State of Knowledge.

Martins J, Vasconcelos V - Mar Drugs (2015)

Bottom Line: Apart from non-ribosomal peptides and polyketides, ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are one of the leading groups of bioactive compounds produced by cyanobacteria.It is assumed that the primary source of cyanobactins is cyanobacteria, although these compounds have also been isolated from marine animals such as ascidians, sponges and mollusks.The aim of this review is to update the current knowledge of cyanobactins, recognized as being produced by cyanobacteria, and to emphasize their genetic clusters and chemical structures as well as their bioactivities, ecological roles and biotechnological potential.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Sciences, University of Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, Porto 4169-007, Portugal. joana.o.martins@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Cyanobacteria are considered to be one of the most promising sources of new, natural products. Apart from non-ribosomal peptides and polyketides, ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are one of the leading groups of bioactive compounds produced by cyanobacteria. Among these, cyanobactins have sparked attention due to their interesting bioactivities and for their potential to be prospective candidates in the development of drugs. It is assumed that the primary source of cyanobactins is cyanobacteria, although these compounds have also been isolated from marine animals such as ascidians, sponges and mollusks. The aim of this review is to update the current knowledge of cyanobactins, recognized as being produced by cyanobacteria, and to emphasize their genetic clusters and chemical structures as well as their bioactivities, ecological roles and biotechnological potential.

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Cyanobactins Time Line. Evolution of cyanobactins since their discovery in 1980 to present.
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marinedrugs-13-06910-f001: Cyanobactins Time Line. Evolution of cyanobactins since their discovery in 1980 to present.

Mentions: Thus far, cyanobactin biosynthetic gene clusters and their respective associated metabolites have been described in cyanobacteria belonging to the unicellular genera Prochloron (patellamide, lissoclinamides, ulithiacyclamides, patellin and trunkamide) [10], Microcystis (microcyclamide, piricyclamide and aerucyclamides) [10,15] and Cyanothece (cyanothecamides) [16,17]. Filamentous non-heterocystous genera such as Trichodesmium (trichamide) [10], Planktothrix (prenylagaramide) [16,18], Lyngbya (aesturamide) and Arthrospira (arthrospiramide) [5,16,19] and filamentous heterocystous genera such as Anabaena (anacyclamide) [20] and Nostoc (tenuecyclamide) [10] are also described as cyanobactin producers. Figure 1 shows cyanobactins time line evolution since their discovery to present.


Cyanobactins from Cyanobacteria: Current Genetic and Chemical State of Knowledge.

Martins J, Vasconcelos V - Mar Drugs (2015)

Cyanobactins Time Line. Evolution of cyanobactins since their discovery in 1980 to present.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663559&req=5

marinedrugs-13-06910-f001: Cyanobactins Time Line. Evolution of cyanobactins since their discovery in 1980 to present.
Mentions: Thus far, cyanobactin biosynthetic gene clusters and their respective associated metabolites have been described in cyanobacteria belonging to the unicellular genera Prochloron (patellamide, lissoclinamides, ulithiacyclamides, patellin and trunkamide) [10], Microcystis (microcyclamide, piricyclamide and aerucyclamides) [10,15] and Cyanothece (cyanothecamides) [16,17]. Filamentous non-heterocystous genera such as Trichodesmium (trichamide) [10], Planktothrix (prenylagaramide) [16,18], Lyngbya (aesturamide) and Arthrospira (arthrospiramide) [5,16,19] and filamentous heterocystous genera such as Anabaena (anacyclamide) [20] and Nostoc (tenuecyclamide) [10] are also described as cyanobactin producers. Figure 1 shows cyanobactins time line evolution since their discovery to present.

Bottom Line: Apart from non-ribosomal peptides and polyketides, ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are one of the leading groups of bioactive compounds produced by cyanobacteria.It is assumed that the primary source of cyanobactins is cyanobacteria, although these compounds have also been isolated from marine animals such as ascidians, sponges and mollusks.The aim of this review is to update the current knowledge of cyanobactins, recognized as being produced by cyanobacteria, and to emphasize their genetic clusters and chemical structures as well as their bioactivities, ecological roles and biotechnological potential.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Sciences, University of Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, Porto 4169-007, Portugal. joana.o.martins@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Cyanobacteria are considered to be one of the most promising sources of new, natural products. Apart from non-ribosomal peptides and polyketides, ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are one of the leading groups of bioactive compounds produced by cyanobacteria. Among these, cyanobactins have sparked attention due to their interesting bioactivities and for their potential to be prospective candidates in the development of drugs. It is assumed that the primary source of cyanobactins is cyanobacteria, although these compounds have also been isolated from marine animals such as ascidians, sponges and mollusks. The aim of this review is to update the current knowledge of cyanobactins, recognized as being produced by cyanobacteria, and to emphasize their genetic clusters and chemical structures as well as their bioactivities, ecological roles and biotechnological potential.

Show MeSH