Limits...
Biomedical and Clinical Importance of Mussel-Inspired Polymers and Materials.

Kaushik NK, Kaushik N, Pardeshi S, Sharma JG, Lee SH, Choi EH - Mar Drugs (2015)

Bottom Line: However, the susceptibility to oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine poses major challenges with regard to the practical translation of mussel adhesion.We discuss the anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity, and adhesive behaviors of mussel bio-products and mussel-inspired materials (MIMs) that make them attractive for synthetic adaptation.The development of biologically inspired adhesive interfaces, bioactive mussel products, MIMs, and arising areas of research leading to biomedical applications are considered in this review.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Plasma Bioscience Research Center, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139701, Korea. kaushik.nagendra@kw.ac.kr.

ABSTRACT
The substance secreted by mussels, also known as nature's glue, is a type of liquid protein that hardens rapidly into a solid water-resistant adhesive material. While in seawater or saline conditions, mussels can adhere to all types of surfaces, sustaining its bonds via mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs), a group of proteins containing 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) and catecholic amino acid. Several aspects of this adhesion process have inspired the development of various types of synthetic materials for biomedical applications. Further, there is an urgent need to utilize biologically inspired strategies to develop new biocompatible materials for medical applications. Consequently, many researchers have recently reported bio-inspired techniques and materials that show results similar to or better than those shown by MAPs for a range of medical applications. However, the susceptibility to oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine poses major challenges with regard to the practical translation of mussel adhesion. In this review, various strategies are discussed to provide an option for DOPA/metal ion chelation and to compensate for the limitations imposed by facile 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine autoxidation. We discuss the anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity, and adhesive behaviors of mussel bio-products and mussel-inspired materials (MIMs) that make them attractive for synthetic adaptation. The development of biologically inspired adhesive interfaces, bioactive mussel products, MIMs, and arising areas of research leading to biomedical applications are considered in this review.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Structures of typical F-acids detected in the green-lipped mussels; (B) Partial synthesis of furan fatty acid F6, and (C) Inhibition of adjuvant-induced arthritis in Wistar rats. The ordinate is the increase in the volume of the rear left paw between the beginning (day 10) and the end of the dosing (day 15) as described by Wakimoto et al. [46]. Reprinted with permission from [46]. Copyright © PNAS, 2011.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663554&req=5

marinedrugs-13-06792-f012: (A) Structures of typical F-acids detected in the green-lipped mussels; (B) Partial synthesis of furan fatty acid F6, and (C) Inhibition of adjuvant-induced arthritis in Wistar rats. The ordinate is the increase in the volume of the rear left paw between the beginning (day 10) and the end of the dosing (day 15) as described by Wakimoto et al. [46]. Reprinted with permission from [46]. Copyright © PNAS, 2011.

Mentions: Wakimoto et al. [46] demonstrated that furan fatty acids (F-acids) are a minor component of the fatty acids in the lipid extract of the New Zealand green-lipped mussels and partially synthesize furan-6 fatty acid and display more potent anti-inflammatory activities than eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (Figure 12). Their study sheds light on F-acids as potential anti-inflammatory agents and paves the way for more thorough examinations of the anti-inflammatory efficacy of the New Zealand green-lipped mussels. They noted that the New Zealand green-lipped mussels may be a preferred food for the efficient intake of F-acids and posited that they can be consumed raw or as stabilized oil extract. Li et al. [47] also reported that hard-shelled mussels lipid extract (HMLE) at a dose of 100 mg/kg of body weight possesses similarly strong anti-inflammatory activity compared to New Zealand green-lipped mussels lipid extract (GMLE), diminishing hind paw swelling and arthritis indexes and improving body weight gain in both adjuvant-induced (AIA) and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats. This strong efficacy may be associated with the down-regulation of inflammatory mediators (LTB4, PGE2, TXB2), pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α) production, MMP (MMP1, MMP13) mRNA expression, and the up-regulation of anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-4, IL-10) production and TIMP1 mRNA expression in the serum and joint tissues of arthritic rats. They also found no hepatotoxicity in AIA rats that received HMLE and GMLE [47]. Beaulieu et al. [48] reported anti-proliferative activities in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) by-products. They tested fractions on four cancerous cell lines: A549 lung adenocarcinoma, BT549 breast tumor, HCT15 human colon tumor and PC3 prostrate cancer. The 50 kDa fraction, enriched in peptides, presented anti-proliferative activity in all cell lines. They claimed that hydrolysates formed due to fractionation from Mytilus edulis after enzymatic hydrolysis. At a protein concentration of 44 µg/mL, the 50 kDa fraction induced mortality rates of 90% for PC3, 89% for A549, 85% for HCT15 and of 81% for the BT549 cell lines. The 50 kDa fraction consists of 56% of proteins, 3% of lipids and 6% of minerals on a dry weight basis and the lowest levels detected of taurine and methionine and the highest levels of threonine, proline and glycine amino acids. Their study suggests that Mytilus edulis by-products should be viewed as high-value products with strong potential as anti-proliferative agents.


Biomedical and Clinical Importance of Mussel-Inspired Polymers and Materials.

Kaushik NK, Kaushik N, Pardeshi S, Sharma JG, Lee SH, Choi EH - Mar Drugs (2015)

(A) Structures of typical F-acids detected in the green-lipped mussels; (B) Partial synthesis of furan fatty acid F6, and (C) Inhibition of adjuvant-induced arthritis in Wistar rats. The ordinate is the increase in the volume of the rear left paw between the beginning (day 10) and the end of the dosing (day 15) as described by Wakimoto et al. [46]. Reprinted with permission from [46]. Copyright © PNAS, 2011.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663554&req=5

marinedrugs-13-06792-f012: (A) Structures of typical F-acids detected in the green-lipped mussels; (B) Partial synthesis of furan fatty acid F6, and (C) Inhibition of adjuvant-induced arthritis in Wistar rats. The ordinate is the increase in the volume of the rear left paw between the beginning (day 10) and the end of the dosing (day 15) as described by Wakimoto et al. [46]. Reprinted with permission from [46]. Copyright © PNAS, 2011.
Mentions: Wakimoto et al. [46] demonstrated that furan fatty acids (F-acids) are a minor component of the fatty acids in the lipid extract of the New Zealand green-lipped mussels and partially synthesize furan-6 fatty acid and display more potent anti-inflammatory activities than eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (Figure 12). Their study sheds light on F-acids as potential anti-inflammatory agents and paves the way for more thorough examinations of the anti-inflammatory efficacy of the New Zealand green-lipped mussels. They noted that the New Zealand green-lipped mussels may be a preferred food for the efficient intake of F-acids and posited that they can be consumed raw or as stabilized oil extract. Li et al. [47] also reported that hard-shelled mussels lipid extract (HMLE) at a dose of 100 mg/kg of body weight possesses similarly strong anti-inflammatory activity compared to New Zealand green-lipped mussels lipid extract (GMLE), diminishing hind paw swelling and arthritis indexes and improving body weight gain in both adjuvant-induced (AIA) and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats. This strong efficacy may be associated with the down-regulation of inflammatory mediators (LTB4, PGE2, TXB2), pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α) production, MMP (MMP1, MMP13) mRNA expression, and the up-regulation of anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-4, IL-10) production and TIMP1 mRNA expression in the serum and joint tissues of arthritic rats. They also found no hepatotoxicity in AIA rats that received HMLE and GMLE [47]. Beaulieu et al. [48] reported anti-proliferative activities in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) by-products. They tested fractions on four cancerous cell lines: A549 lung adenocarcinoma, BT549 breast tumor, HCT15 human colon tumor and PC3 prostrate cancer. The 50 kDa fraction, enriched in peptides, presented anti-proliferative activity in all cell lines. They claimed that hydrolysates formed due to fractionation from Mytilus edulis after enzymatic hydrolysis. At a protein concentration of 44 µg/mL, the 50 kDa fraction induced mortality rates of 90% for PC3, 89% for A549, 85% for HCT15 and of 81% for the BT549 cell lines. The 50 kDa fraction consists of 56% of proteins, 3% of lipids and 6% of minerals on a dry weight basis and the lowest levels detected of taurine and methionine and the highest levels of threonine, proline and glycine amino acids. Their study suggests that Mytilus edulis by-products should be viewed as high-value products with strong potential as anti-proliferative agents.

Bottom Line: However, the susceptibility to oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine poses major challenges with regard to the practical translation of mussel adhesion.We discuss the anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity, and adhesive behaviors of mussel bio-products and mussel-inspired materials (MIMs) that make them attractive for synthetic adaptation.The development of biologically inspired adhesive interfaces, bioactive mussel products, MIMs, and arising areas of research leading to biomedical applications are considered in this review.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Plasma Bioscience Research Center, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139701, Korea. kaushik.nagendra@kw.ac.kr.

ABSTRACT
The substance secreted by mussels, also known as nature's glue, is a type of liquid protein that hardens rapidly into a solid water-resistant adhesive material. While in seawater or saline conditions, mussels can adhere to all types of surfaces, sustaining its bonds via mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs), a group of proteins containing 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) and catecholic amino acid. Several aspects of this adhesion process have inspired the development of various types of synthetic materials for biomedical applications. Further, there is an urgent need to utilize biologically inspired strategies to develop new biocompatible materials for medical applications. Consequently, many researchers have recently reported bio-inspired techniques and materials that show results similar to or better than those shown by MAPs for a range of medical applications. However, the susceptibility to oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine poses major challenges with regard to the practical translation of mussel adhesion. In this review, various strategies are discussed to provide an option for DOPA/metal ion chelation and to compensate for the limitations imposed by facile 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine autoxidation. We discuss the anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity, and adhesive behaviors of mussel bio-products and mussel-inspired materials (MIMs) that make them attractive for synthetic adaptation. The development of biologically inspired adhesive interfaces, bioactive mussel products, MIMs, and arising areas of research leading to biomedical applications are considered in this review.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus