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Biomedical and Clinical Importance of Mussel-Inspired Polymers and Materials.

Kaushik NK, Kaushik N, Pardeshi S, Sharma JG, Lee SH, Choi EH - Mar Drugs (2015)

Bottom Line: However, the susceptibility to oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine poses major challenges with regard to the practical translation of mussel adhesion.We discuss the anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity, and adhesive behaviors of mussel bio-products and mussel-inspired materials (MIMs) that make them attractive for synthetic adaptation.The development of biologically inspired adhesive interfaces, bioactive mussel products, MIMs, and arising areas of research leading to biomedical applications are considered in this review.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Plasma Bioscience Research Center, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139701, Korea. kaushik.nagendra@kw.ac.kr.

ABSTRACT
The substance secreted by mussels, also known as nature's glue, is a type of liquid protein that hardens rapidly into a solid water-resistant adhesive material. While in seawater or saline conditions, mussels can adhere to all types of surfaces, sustaining its bonds via mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs), a group of proteins containing 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) and catecholic amino acid. Several aspects of this adhesion process have inspired the development of various types of synthetic materials for biomedical applications. Further, there is an urgent need to utilize biologically inspired strategies to develop new biocompatible materials for medical applications. Consequently, many researchers have recently reported bio-inspired techniques and materials that show results similar to or better than those shown by MAPs for a range of medical applications. However, the susceptibility to oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine poses major challenges with regard to the practical translation of mussel adhesion. In this review, various strategies are discussed to provide an option for DOPA/metal ion chelation and to compensate for the limitations imposed by facile 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine autoxidation. We discuss the anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity, and adhesive behaviors of mussel bio-products and mussel-inspired materials (MIMs) that make them attractive for synthetic adaptation. The development of biologically inspired adhesive interfaces, bioactive mussel products, MIMs, and arising areas of research leading to biomedical applications are considered in this review.

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Structure of nitro-dopamine derivatives.
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marinedrugs-13-06792-f009: Structure of nitro-dopamine derivatives.

Mentions: Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, led by Aránzazu del Campo, synthesized an underwater adhesive that bonds strongly to various types of surfaces [39]. In contrast to previous mussel-inspired adhesives, this new glue is reversible, as it degrades and detaches when exposed to light. It is also biocompatible and can repair itself, fusing on its own when cut. This adhesive material can be used for closing wounds and in drug delivery patches, detachable scaffolds for tissue regeneration, and substrates for cell engineering. Campo et al. [39] create their waterproof glue with nitrodopamine, a natural molecule that is related to DOPA. They reported that the adhesive properties of nitrodopamine are more stable than those of DOPA (Figure 9). This allows the cross-linking and solidification of the adhesive in a manner similar to the process used by the mussels, but the adhesive degrades when it is exposed to light of a particular wavelength. This synthesized nitrodopamine are identical to the adhesives of mussels, but they can be detached on demand.


Biomedical and Clinical Importance of Mussel-Inspired Polymers and Materials.

Kaushik NK, Kaushik N, Pardeshi S, Sharma JG, Lee SH, Choi EH - Mar Drugs (2015)

Structure of nitro-dopamine derivatives.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663554&req=5

marinedrugs-13-06792-f009: Structure of nitro-dopamine derivatives.
Mentions: Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, led by Aránzazu del Campo, synthesized an underwater adhesive that bonds strongly to various types of surfaces [39]. In contrast to previous mussel-inspired adhesives, this new glue is reversible, as it degrades and detaches when exposed to light. It is also biocompatible and can repair itself, fusing on its own when cut. This adhesive material can be used for closing wounds and in drug delivery patches, detachable scaffolds for tissue regeneration, and substrates for cell engineering. Campo et al. [39] create their waterproof glue with nitrodopamine, a natural molecule that is related to DOPA. They reported that the adhesive properties of nitrodopamine are more stable than those of DOPA (Figure 9). This allows the cross-linking and solidification of the adhesive in a manner similar to the process used by the mussels, but the adhesive degrades when it is exposed to light of a particular wavelength. This synthesized nitrodopamine are identical to the adhesives of mussels, but they can be detached on demand.

Bottom Line: However, the susceptibility to oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine poses major challenges with regard to the practical translation of mussel adhesion.We discuss the anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity, and adhesive behaviors of mussel bio-products and mussel-inspired materials (MIMs) that make them attractive for synthetic adaptation.The development of biologically inspired adhesive interfaces, bioactive mussel products, MIMs, and arising areas of research leading to biomedical applications are considered in this review.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Plasma Bioscience Research Center, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139701, Korea. kaushik.nagendra@kw.ac.kr.

ABSTRACT
The substance secreted by mussels, also known as nature's glue, is a type of liquid protein that hardens rapidly into a solid water-resistant adhesive material. While in seawater or saline conditions, mussels can adhere to all types of surfaces, sustaining its bonds via mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs), a group of proteins containing 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) and catecholic amino acid. Several aspects of this adhesion process have inspired the development of various types of synthetic materials for biomedical applications. Further, there is an urgent need to utilize biologically inspired strategies to develop new biocompatible materials for medical applications. Consequently, many researchers have recently reported bio-inspired techniques and materials that show results similar to or better than those shown by MAPs for a range of medical applications. However, the susceptibility to oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine poses major challenges with regard to the practical translation of mussel adhesion. In this review, various strategies are discussed to provide an option for DOPA/metal ion chelation and to compensate for the limitations imposed by facile 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine autoxidation. We discuss the anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity, and adhesive behaviors of mussel bio-products and mussel-inspired materials (MIMs) that make them attractive for synthetic adaptation. The development of biologically inspired adhesive interfaces, bioactive mussel products, MIMs, and arising areas of research leading to biomedical applications are considered in this review.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus