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Biomedical and Clinical Importance of Mussel-Inspired Polymers and Materials.

Kaushik NK, Kaushik N, Pardeshi S, Sharma JG, Lee SH, Choi EH - Mar Drugs (2015)

Bottom Line: However, the susceptibility to oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine poses major challenges with regard to the practical translation of mussel adhesion.We discuss the anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity, and adhesive behaviors of mussel bio-products and mussel-inspired materials (MIMs) that make them attractive for synthetic adaptation.The development of biologically inspired adhesive interfaces, bioactive mussel products, MIMs, and arising areas of research leading to biomedical applications are considered in this review.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Plasma Bioscience Research Center, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139701, Korea. kaushik.nagendra@kw.ac.kr.

ABSTRACT
The substance secreted by mussels, also known as nature's glue, is a type of liquid protein that hardens rapidly into a solid water-resistant adhesive material. While in seawater or saline conditions, mussels can adhere to all types of surfaces, sustaining its bonds via mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs), a group of proteins containing 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) and catecholic amino acid. Several aspects of this adhesion process have inspired the development of various types of synthetic materials for biomedical applications. Further, there is an urgent need to utilize biologically inspired strategies to develop new biocompatible materials for medical applications. Consequently, many researchers have recently reported bio-inspired techniques and materials that show results similar to or better than those shown by MAPs for a range of medical applications. However, the susceptibility to oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine poses major challenges with regard to the practical translation of mussel adhesion. In this review, various strategies are discussed to provide an option for DOPA/metal ion chelation and to compensate for the limitations imposed by facile 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine autoxidation. We discuss the anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity, and adhesive behaviors of mussel bio-products and mussel-inspired materials (MIMs) that make them attractive for synthetic adaptation. The development of biologically inspired adhesive interfaces, bioactive mussel products, MIMs, and arising areas of research leading to biomedical applications are considered in this review.

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The effect of polydopamine coated Poly (l-lactide) (PLLA) fibers on the adhesion, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Adapted with permission from [36]. Copyright © Elsevier, 2012.
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marinedrugs-13-06792-f008: The effect of polydopamine coated Poly (l-lactide) (PLLA) fibers on the adhesion, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Adapted with permission from [36]. Copyright © Elsevier, 2012.

Mentions: The development of biomaterials to direct the fate of stem cells is essential for the stem-cell-based regeneration of bone tissue. Recently, functionalized electrospun fibers using a mussel-inspired surface coating to regulate the adhesion, growth and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were developed (Figure 8) [36]. Poly (l-lactide) (PLLA) fibers coated with polydopamine (PD-PLLA) were prepared and incubated in a dopamine solution for 1 h, resulting in the formation of PD with less of an effect on the roughness and hydrophobicity of the fibers. The prepared PD-PLLA fibers modulated the hMSC responses in many ways. Importantly, the adhesion and proliferation of hMSCs cultured on PD-PLLA were significantly enhanced relative to those cultured on PLLA alone. In addition, hMSCs cultured on PD-PLLA demonstrated the up-regulation of genes associated with osteogenic differentiation as well as angiogenesis. These outcomes indicate that the simple bio-inspired surface modification of organic fiber substrates using PD is a very promising means of regulating stem-cell functions, possibly allowing the realization of effective stem-cell delivery carriers for bone tissue engineering applications [36].


Biomedical and Clinical Importance of Mussel-Inspired Polymers and Materials.

Kaushik NK, Kaushik N, Pardeshi S, Sharma JG, Lee SH, Choi EH - Mar Drugs (2015)

The effect of polydopamine coated Poly (l-lactide) (PLLA) fibers on the adhesion, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Adapted with permission from [36]. Copyright © Elsevier, 2012.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663554&req=5

marinedrugs-13-06792-f008: The effect of polydopamine coated Poly (l-lactide) (PLLA) fibers on the adhesion, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Adapted with permission from [36]. Copyright © Elsevier, 2012.
Mentions: The development of biomaterials to direct the fate of stem cells is essential for the stem-cell-based regeneration of bone tissue. Recently, functionalized electrospun fibers using a mussel-inspired surface coating to regulate the adhesion, growth and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were developed (Figure 8) [36]. Poly (l-lactide) (PLLA) fibers coated with polydopamine (PD-PLLA) were prepared and incubated in a dopamine solution for 1 h, resulting in the formation of PD with less of an effect on the roughness and hydrophobicity of the fibers. The prepared PD-PLLA fibers modulated the hMSC responses in many ways. Importantly, the adhesion and proliferation of hMSCs cultured on PD-PLLA were significantly enhanced relative to those cultured on PLLA alone. In addition, hMSCs cultured on PD-PLLA demonstrated the up-regulation of genes associated with osteogenic differentiation as well as angiogenesis. These outcomes indicate that the simple bio-inspired surface modification of organic fiber substrates using PD is a very promising means of regulating stem-cell functions, possibly allowing the realization of effective stem-cell delivery carriers for bone tissue engineering applications [36].

Bottom Line: However, the susceptibility to oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine poses major challenges with regard to the practical translation of mussel adhesion.We discuss the anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity, and adhesive behaviors of mussel bio-products and mussel-inspired materials (MIMs) that make them attractive for synthetic adaptation.The development of biologically inspired adhesive interfaces, bioactive mussel products, MIMs, and arising areas of research leading to biomedical applications are considered in this review.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Plasma Bioscience Research Center, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139701, Korea. kaushik.nagendra@kw.ac.kr.

ABSTRACT
The substance secreted by mussels, also known as nature's glue, is a type of liquid protein that hardens rapidly into a solid water-resistant adhesive material. While in seawater or saline conditions, mussels can adhere to all types of surfaces, sustaining its bonds via mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs), a group of proteins containing 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) and catecholic amino acid. Several aspects of this adhesion process have inspired the development of various types of synthetic materials for biomedical applications. Further, there is an urgent need to utilize biologically inspired strategies to develop new biocompatible materials for medical applications. Consequently, many researchers have recently reported bio-inspired techniques and materials that show results similar to or better than those shown by MAPs for a range of medical applications. However, the susceptibility to oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine poses major challenges with regard to the practical translation of mussel adhesion. In this review, various strategies are discussed to provide an option for DOPA/metal ion chelation and to compensate for the limitations imposed by facile 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine autoxidation. We discuss the anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity, and adhesive behaviors of mussel bio-products and mussel-inspired materials (MIMs) that make them attractive for synthetic adaptation. The development of biologically inspired adhesive interfaces, bioactive mussel products, MIMs, and arising areas of research leading to biomedical applications are considered in this review.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus