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Biomedical and Clinical Importance of Mussel-Inspired Polymers and Materials.

Kaushik NK, Kaushik N, Pardeshi S, Sharma JG, Lee SH, Choi EH - Mar Drugs (2015)

Bottom Line: However, the susceptibility to oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine poses major challenges with regard to the practical translation of mussel adhesion.We discuss the anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity, and adhesive behaviors of mussel bio-products and mussel-inspired materials (MIMs) that make them attractive for synthetic adaptation.The development of biologically inspired adhesive interfaces, bioactive mussel products, MIMs, and arising areas of research leading to biomedical applications are considered in this review.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Plasma Bioscience Research Center, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139701, Korea. kaushik.nagendra@kw.ac.kr.

ABSTRACT
The substance secreted by mussels, also known as nature's glue, is a type of liquid protein that hardens rapidly into a solid water-resistant adhesive material. While in seawater or saline conditions, mussels can adhere to all types of surfaces, sustaining its bonds via mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs), a group of proteins containing 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) and catecholic amino acid. Several aspects of this adhesion process have inspired the development of various types of synthetic materials for biomedical applications. Further, there is an urgent need to utilize biologically inspired strategies to develop new biocompatible materials for medical applications. Consequently, many researchers have recently reported bio-inspired techniques and materials that show results similar to or better than those shown by MAPs for a range of medical applications. However, the susceptibility to oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine poses major challenges with regard to the practical translation of mussel adhesion. In this review, various strategies are discussed to provide an option for DOPA/metal ion chelation and to compensate for the limitations imposed by facile 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine autoxidation. We discuss the anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity, and adhesive behaviors of mussel bio-products and mussel-inspired materials (MIMs) that make them attractive for synthetic adaptation. The development of biologically inspired adhesive interfaces, bioactive mussel products, MIMs, and arising areas of research leading to biomedical applications are considered in this review.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic representation of the polydopamine encapsulation of individual yeast cells and the functionalization of artificial shells. Adapted with permission from [15]. Copyright © The American Chemical Society, 2011.
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marinedrugs-13-06792-f007: Schematic representation of the polydopamine encapsulation of individual yeast cells and the functionalization of artificial shells. Adapted with permission from [15]. Copyright © The American Chemical Society, 2011.

Mentions: Recently, researchers verified the reactive encapsulation of individual yeast cells with PD, which is a biocompatible coating material inspired by the adhesive proteins of mussels [27]. This type of individual encapsulation with PD is importantly linked to the realization of artificial spores. The PD coating was found to be stable in comparison with polyelectrolyte multilayers, and effective in protecting living cells and controlling the cell division process. The PD encapsulation strategy is a good starting point for both research and for applications based on artificial spores. This strategy endows living cells with durability against harsh surroundings, provides controllability of cell cycles, and facilitates reactivity for the modification of cell-surfaces (Figure 7). The Messersmith group also introduced a two-step surface modification method in which the self-polymerization of dopamine produced an adherent PD coating on a wide range of inorganic and organic materials, including noble metals, oxides, polymers, semiconductors, and ceramics [15]. Secondary reactions can be used to create a variety of ad-layers, including self-assembled monolayers through the deposition of long-chain molecular building blocks, metal films by electroless metallization, and bioinert and bioactive surfaces via the grafting of macromolecules. In their work, Lee et al. [15] engineered PD surfaces for specific biomolecular interactions by forming an ad-layer of glycosaminoglycan hyaluronic acid (HA). HA/receptor interactions are important in many physiological processes, including angiogenesis, hematopoietic stem-cell commitment and homing, and tumor metastasis. A technique based on MIMs could aid in a number of surgical procedures. Among them are eyelid transplants and the correction of a ruptured fetal membrane or amniotic sac during pregnancy [28].


Biomedical and Clinical Importance of Mussel-Inspired Polymers and Materials.

Kaushik NK, Kaushik N, Pardeshi S, Sharma JG, Lee SH, Choi EH - Mar Drugs (2015)

Schematic representation of the polydopamine encapsulation of individual yeast cells and the functionalization of artificial shells. Adapted with permission from [15]. Copyright © The American Chemical Society, 2011.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663554&req=5

marinedrugs-13-06792-f007: Schematic representation of the polydopamine encapsulation of individual yeast cells and the functionalization of artificial shells. Adapted with permission from [15]. Copyright © The American Chemical Society, 2011.
Mentions: Recently, researchers verified the reactive encapsulation of individual yeast cells with PD, which is a biocompatible coating material inspired by the adhesive proteins of mussels [27]. This type of individual encapsulation with PD is importantly linked to the realization of artificial spores. The PD coating was found to be stable in comparison with polyelectrolyte multilayers, and effective in protecting living cells and controlling the cell division process. The PD encapsulation strategy is a good starting point for both research and for applications based on artificial spores. This strategy endows living cells with durability against harsh surroundings, provides controllability of cell cycles, and facilitates reactivity for the modification of cell-surfaces (Figure 7). The Messersmith group also introduced a two-step surface modification method in which the self-polymerization of dopamine produced an adherent PD coating on a wide range of inorganic and organic materials, including noble metals, oxides, polymers, semiconductors, and ceramics [15]. Secondary reactions can be used to create a variety of ad-layers, including self-assembled monolayers through the deposition of long-chain molecular building blocks, metal films by electroless metallization, and bioinert and bioactive surfaces via the grafting of macromolecules. In their work, Lee et al. [15] engineered PD surfaces for specific biomolecular interactions by forming an ad-layer of glycosaminoglycan hyaluronic acid (HA). HA/receptor interactions are important in many physiological processes, including angiogenesis, hematopoietic stem-cell commitment and homing, and tumor metastasis. A technique based on MIMs could aid in a number of surgical procedures. Among them are eyelid transplants and the correction of a ruptured fetal membrane or amniotic sac during pregnancy [28].

Bottom Line: However, the susceptibility to oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine poses major challenges with regard to the practical translation of mussel adhesion.We discuss the anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity, and adhesive behaviors of mussel bio-products and mussel-inspired materials (MIMs) that make them attractive for synthetic adaptation.The development of biologically inspired adhesive interfaces, bioactive mussel products, MIMs, and arising areas of research leading to biomedical applications are considered in this review.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Plasma Bioscience Research Center, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139701, Korea. kaushik.nagendra@kw.ac.kr.

ABSTRACT
The substance secreted by mussels, also known as nature's glue, is a type of liquid protein that hardens rapidly into a solid water-resistant adhesive material. While in seawater or saline conditions, mussels can adhere to all types of surfaces, sustaining its bonds via mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs), a group of proteins containing 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) and catecholic amino acid. Several aspects of this adhesion process have inspired the development of various types of synthetic materials for biomedical applications. Further, there is an urgent need to utilize biologically inspired strategies to develop new biocompatible materials for medical applications. Consequently, many researchers have recently reported bio-inspired techniques and materials that show results similar to or better than those shown by MAPs for a range of medical applications. However, the susceptibility to oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine poses major challenges with regard to the practical translation of mussel adhesion. In this review, various strategies are discussed to provide an option for DOPA/metal ion chelation and to compensate for the limitations imposed by facile 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine autoxidation. We discuss the anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity, and adhesive behaviors of mussel bio-products and mussel-inspired materials (MIMs) that make them attractive for synthetic adaptation. The development of biologically inspired adhesive interfaces, bioactive mussel products, MIMs, and arising areas of research leading to biomedical applications are considered in this review.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus