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Biomedical and Clinical Importance of Mussel-Inspired Polymers and Materials.

Kaushik NK, Kaushik N, Pardeshi S, Sharma JG, Lee SH, Choi EH - Mar Drugs (2015)

Bottom Line: However, the susceptibility to oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine poses major challenges with regard to the practical translation of mussel adhesion.We discuss the anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity, and adhesive behaviors of mussel bio-products and mussel-inspired materials (MIMs) that make them attractive for synthetic adaptation.The development of biologically inspired adhesive interfaces, bioactive mussel products, MIMs, and arising areas of research leading to biomedical applications are considered in this review.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Plasma Bioscience Research Center, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139701, Korea. kaushik.nagendra@kw.ac.kr.

ABSTRACT
The substance secreted by mussels, also known as nature's glue, is a type of liquid protein that hardens rapidly into a solid water-resistant adhesive material. While in seawater or saline conditions, mussels can adhere to all types of surfaces, sustaining its bonds via mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs), a group of proteins containing 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) and catecholic amino acid. Several aspects of this adhesion process have inspired the development of various types of synthetic materials for biomedical applications. Further, there is an urgent need to utilize biologically inspired strategies to develop new biocompatible materials for medical applications. Consequently, many researchers have recently reported bio-inspired techniques and materials that show results similar to or better than those shown by MAPs for a range of medical applications. However, the susceptibility to oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine poses major challenges with regard to the practical translation of mussel adhesion. In this review, various strategies are discussed to provide an option for DOPA/metal ion chelation and to compensate for the limitations imposed by facile 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine autoxidation. We discuss the anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity, and adhesive behaviors of mussel bio-products and mussel-inspired materials (MIMs) that make them attractive for synthetic adaptation. The development of biologically inspired adhesive interfaces, bioactive mussel products, MIMs, and arising areas of research leading to biomedical applications are considered in this review.

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Application of mussel-inspired substrate-coated materials.
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marinedrugs-13-06792-f004: Application of mussel-inspired substrate-coated materials.

Mentions: Lee et al. [15] introduced a simple means of surface modification in which the self-polymerization of dopamine formed an adherent polydopamine (PD) coating on a variety of materials. Coating by PD can serve as a versatile stage for secondary surface-mediated reactions, ultimately leading to metal self-assembled monolayers and grafted polymer coatings. This two-step surface modification method is distinctive in terms of its ease of application, its use of simple ingredients and reaction conditions, its applicability to many types of materials of complex shapes, and its capacity for multiple end uses, especially for antimicrobial and cell adhesive substrates (Figure 4) [15]. It has been shown that DOPA nested in hydrophobic aromatic sequences not only enhances adhesion at a neutral pH (pI or IEP) but also contributes significantly to the cohesive interactions between adhesive proteins [16]. The hydrophobic amino acid residues in the Mfp3 slow sequence provide DOPA with a microenvironment that retards oxidation by shielding the amino acids from the solvent, endowing the protein with the ability to maintain adhesion at a neutral to slightly basic pH. More importantly, hydrophobic interactions and inter-residue H-bonding combine to result in strong cohesion within Mfp3 slow layers over a relatively wide pH range [16]. This strategy provides an alternative to DOPA/metal ion chelation, and compensates in part for the limitations imposed by facile DOPA-autoxidation. By exploring the adhesive and cohesive mechanisms of bonding by the Mfp3 slow sequence, several studies have revealed that the wet adhesion of mussels is more complicated than a simple DOPA-mediated recipe, providing a rationale for engineering DOPA into a new generation of bio-inspired synthetic adhesive polymers. Waite et al. [17] reported that DOPA-containing proteins are important with regard to wet adhesion in mussels and possibly in other sessile organisms as well. Bonding depends on DOPA in both reduced and oxidized forms for adhesion and cohesion, respectively. DOPA is highly vulnerable to spontaneous oxidation, and controlling the DOPA redox is a crucial challenge when using it in adhesion applications. Mussels appear to achieve such control in their byssal attachment pad. Understanding the particulars of natural redox control may provide fundamentally important insights into adhesive polymer engineering and antifouling strategies.


Biomedical and Clinical Importance of Mussel-Inspired Polymers and Materials.

Kaushik NK, Kaushik N, Pardeshi S, Sharma JG, Lee SH, Choi EH - Mar Drugs (2015)

Application of mussel-inspired substrate-coated materials.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663554&req=5

marinedrugs-13-06792-f004: Application of mussel-inspired substrate-coated materials.
Mentions: Lee et al. [15] introduced a simple means of surface modification in which the self-polymerization of dopamine formed an adherent polydopamine (PD) coating on a variety of materials. Coating by PD can serve as a versatile stage for secondary surface-mediated reactions, ultimately leading to metal self-assembled monolayers and grafted polymer coatings. This two-step surface modification method is distinctive in terms of its ease of application, its use of simple ingredients and reaction conditions, its applicability to many types of materials of complex shapes, and its capacity for multiple end uses, especially for antimicrobial and cell adhesive substrates (Figure 4) [15]. It has been shown that DOPA nested in hydrophobic aromatic sequences not only enhances adhesion at a neutral pH (pI or IEP) but also contributes significantly to the cohesive interactions between adhesive proteins [16]. The hydrophobic amino acid residues in the Mfp3 slow sequence provide DOPA with a microenvironment that retards oxidation by shielding the amino acids from the solvent, endowing the protein with the ability to maintain adhesion at a neutral to slightly basic pH. More importantly, hydrophobic interactions and inter-residue H-bonding combine to result in strong cohesion within Mfp3 slow layers over a relatively wide pH range [16]. This strategy provides an alternative to DOPA/metal ion chelation, and compensates in part for the limitations imposed by facile DOPA-autoxidation. By exploring the adhesive and cohesive mechanisms of bonding by the Mfp3 slow sequence, several studies have revealed that the wet adhesion of mussels is more complicated than a simple DOPA-mediated recipe, providing a rationale for engineering DOPA into a new generation of bio-inspired synthetic adhesive polymers. Waite et al. [17] reported that DOPA-containing proteins are important with regard to wet adhesion in mussels and possibly in other sessile organisms as well. Bonding depends on DOPA in both reduced and oxidized forms for adhesion and cohesion, respectively. DOPA is highly vulnerable to spontaneous oxidation, and controlling the DOPA redox is a crucial challenge when using it in adhesion applications. Mussels appear to achieve such control in their byssal attachment pad. Understanding the particulars of natural redox control may provide fundamentally important insights into adhesive polymer engineering and antifouling strategies.

Bottom Line: However, the susceptibility to oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine poses major challenges with regard to the practical translation of mussel adhesion.We discuss the anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity, and adhesive behaviors of mussel bio-products and mussel-inspired materials (MIMs) that make them attractive for synthetic adaptation.The development of biologically inspired adhesive interfaces, bioactive mussel products, MIMs, and arising areas of research leading to biomedical applications are considered in this review.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Plasma Bioscience Research Center, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139701, Korea. kaushik.nagendra@kw.ac.kr.

ABSTRACT
The substance secreted by mussels, also known as nature's glue, is a type of liquid protein that hardens rapidly into a solid water-resistant adhesive material. While in seawater or saline conditions, mussels can adhere to all types of surfaces, sustaining its bonds via mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs), a group of proteins containing 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) and catecholic amino acid. Several aspects of this adhesion process have inspired the development of various types of synthetic materials for biomedical applications. Further, there is an urgent need to utilize biologically inspired strategies to develop new biocompatible materials for medical applications. Consequently, many researchers have recently reported bio-inspired techniques and materials that show results similar to or better than those shown by MAPs for a range of medical applications. However, the susceptibility to oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine poses major challenges with regard to the practical translation of mussel adhesion. In this review, various strategies are discussed to provide an option for DOPA/metal ion chelation and to compensate for the limitations imposed by facile 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine autoxidation. We discuss the anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity, and adhesive behaviors of mussel bio-products and mussel-inspired materials (MIMs) that make them attractive for synthetic adaptation. The development of biologically inspired adhesive interfaces, bioactive mussel products, MIMs, and arising areas of research leading to biomedical applications are considered in this review.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus