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Biomedical and Clinical Importance of Mussel-Inspired Polymers and Materials.

Kaushik NK, Kaushik N, Pardeshi S, Sharma JG, Lee SH, Choi EH - Mar Drugs (2015)

Bottom Line: However, the susceptibility to oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine poses major challenges with regard to the practical translation of mussel adhesion.We discuss the anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity, and adhesive behaviors of mussel bio-products and mussel-inspired materials (MIMs) that make them attractive for synthetic adaptation.The development of biologically inspired adhesive interfaces, bioactive mussel products, MIMs, and arising areas of research leading to biomedical applications are considered in this review.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Plasma Bioscience Research Center, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139701, Korea. kaushik.nagendra@kw.ac.kr.

ABSTRACT
The substance secreted by mussels, also known as nature's glue, is a type of liquid protein that hardens rapidly into a solid water-resistant adhesive material. While in seawater or saline conditions, mussels can adhere to all types of surfaces, sustaining its bonds via mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs), a group of proteins containing 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) and catecholic amino acid. Several aspects of this adhesion process have inspired the development of various types of synthetic materials for biomedical applications. Further, there is an urgent need to utilize biologically inspired strategies to develop new biocompatible materials for medical applications. Consequently, many researchers have recently reported bio-inspired techniques and materials that show results similar to or better than those shown by MAPs for a range of medical applications. However, the susceptibility to oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine poses major challenges with regard to the practical translation of mussel adhesion. In this review, various strategies are discussed to provide an option for DOPA/metal ion chelation and to compensate for the limitations imposed by facile 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine autoxidation. We discuss the anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity, and adhesive behaviors of mussel bio-products and mussel-inspired materials (MIMs) that make them attractive for synthetic adaptation. The development of biologically inspired adhesive interfaces, bioactive mussel products, MIMs, and arising areas of research leading to biomedical applications are considered in this review.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Mussel-inspired targeted drug delivery as an anticancer treatment.
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marinedrugs-13-06792-f003: Mussel-inspired targeted drug delivery as an anticancer treatment.

Mentions: Researchers have investigated the applications of mussels-inspired materials (MIMs) for the construction of ultra-small magnetic nanoparticles with catechol-derivative anchor groups which possess an irreversible binding affinity to metal oxides and thus can optimally disperse super-paramagnetic nanoparticles under physiological conditions. This not only leads to ultra-stable metal-oxide nanoparticles but also allows close control over the hydrodynamic diameter and interfacial chemistry. The latter is a crucial breakthrough in the assembly of functionalized magnetic nanoparticles [7]. This review demonstrates how an advanced and highly multifunctional material can be engineered and developed using MIMs (mussel-inspired materials). Synthetic adhesives and materials inspired by mussels have been applied extensively, and it is expected that the characterization and adaptation of many other biological adhesive strategies will follow [8]. MIMs play important roles in cancer drug delivery and in the destruction and removal of cancer cells. Recently, a mussel-inspired polymer was designed to form pH-sensitive drug delivery vehicles that are stable in the bloodstream at physiological pH levels, but become activated in acidic tumor environments, thus releasing the drug (Figure 2). A new design involves a modification of the surface of gold nanorods (NRs) with a mussel-inspired polymer coating. The NRs target cancer cells when they are irradiated, thus producing highly localized heating that destroys the cancer cells (Figure 3) [9]. Recent study integrated the chemical structure of the MAP into the design of an injectable synthetic polymer. The novel injectable citrate-based mussel-inspired bioadhesive showed controlled degradability and improved biocompatibility at a low manufacturing cost, with many more advantages in relation to current products such as fibrin glue and cyanoacrylate adhesives, which can induce allergic reactions and toxicity [10]. Injectable citrate-based mussel-inspired bioadhesives are non-toxic and are thus unlikely to cause allergic reactions and side effects. Researchers have also attempted to make the adhesion strength even stronger with no inflammatory responses [10]. In the present review, we discuss the importance of mussel bio-products and MIMs with regard to surface coatings, adhesive properties, medicine, surgery, biomedical science and bio-nanotechnology.


Biomedical and Clinical Importance of Mussel-Inspired Polymers and Materials.

Kaushik NK, Kaushik N, Pardeshi S, Sharma JG, Lee SH, Choi EH - Mar Drugs (2015)

Mussel-inspired targeted drug delivery as an anticancer treatment.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663554&req=5

marinedrugs-13-06792-f003: Mussel-inspired targeted drug delivery as an anticancer treatment.
Mentions: Researchers have investigated the applications of mussels-inspired materials (MIMs) for the construction of ultra-small magnetic nanoparticles with catechol-derivative anchor groups which possess an irreversible binding affinity to metal oxides and thus can optimally disperse super-paramagnetic nanoparticles under physiological conditions. This not only leads to ultra-stable metal-oxide nanoparticles but also allows close control over the hydrodynamic diameter and interfacial chemistry. The latter is a crucial breakthrough in the assembly of functionalized magnetic nanoparticles [7]. This review demonstrates how an advanced and highly multifunctional material can be engineered and developed using MIMs (mussel-inspired materials). Synthetic adhesives and materials inspired by mussels have been applied extensively, and it is expected that the characterization and adaptation of many other biological adhesive strategies will follow [8]. MIMs play important roles in cancer drug delivery and in the destruction and removal of cancer cells. Recently, a mussel-inspired polymer was designed to form pH-sensitive drug delivery vehicles that are stable in the bloodstream at physiological pH levels, but become activated in acidic tumor environments, thus releasing the drug (Figure 2). A new design involves a modification of the surface of gold nanorods (NRs) with a mussel-inspired polymer coating. The NRs target cancer cells when they are irradiated, thus producing highly localized heating that destroys the cancer cells (Figure 3) [9]. Recent study integrated the chemical structure of the MAP into the design of an injectable synthetic polymer. The novel injectable citrate-based mussel-inspired bioadhesive showed controlled degradability and improved biocompatibility at a low manufacturing cost, with many more advantages in relation to current products such as fibrin glue and cyanoacrylate adhesives, which can induce allergic reactions and toxicity [10]. Injectable citrate-based mussel-inspired bioadhesives are non-toxic and are thus unlikely to cause allergic reactions and side effects. Researchers have also attempted to make the adhesion strength even stronger with no inflammatory responses [10]. In the present review, we discuss the importance of mussel bio-products and MIMs with regard to surface coatings, adhesive properties, medicine, surgery, biomedical science and bio-nanotechnology.

Bottom Line: However, the susceptibility to oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine poses major challenges with regard to the practical translation of mussel adhesion.We discuss the anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity, and adhesive behaviors of mussel bio-products and mussel-inspired materials (MIMs) that make them attractive for synthetic adaptation.The development of biologically inspired adhesive interfaces, bioactive mussel products, MIMs, and arising areas of research leading to biomedical applications are considered in this review.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Plasma Bioscience Research Center, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139701, Korea. kaushik.nagendra@kw.ac.kr.

ABSTRACT
The substance secreted by mussels, also known as nature's glue, is a type of liquid protein that hardens rapidly into a solid water-resistant adhesive material. While in seawater or saline conditions, mussels can adhere to all types of surfaces, sustaining its bonds via mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs), a group of proteins containing 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) and catecholic amino acid. Several aspects of this adhesion process have inspired the development of various types of synthetic materials for biomedical applications. Further, there is an urgent need to utilize biologically inspired strategies to develop new biocompatible materials for medical applications. Consequently, many researchers have recently reported bio-inspired techniques and materials that show results similar to or better than those shown by MAPs for a range of medical applications. However, the susceptibility to oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine poses major challenges with regard to the practical translation of mussel adhesion. In this review, various strategies are discussed to provide an option for DOPA/metal ion chelation and to compensate for the limitations imposed by facile 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine autoxidation. We discuss the anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity, and adhesive behaviors of mussel bio-products and mussel-inspired materials (MIMs) that make them attractive for synthetic adaptation. The development of biologically inspired adhesive interfaces, bioactive mussel products, MIMs, and arising areas of research leading to biomedical applications are considered in this review.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus