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Biomedical and Clinical Importance of Mussel-Inspired Polymers and Materials.

Kaushik NK, Kaushik N, Pardeshi S, Sharma JG, Lee SH, Choi EH - Mar Drugs (2015)

Bottom Line: However, the susceptibility to oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine poses major challenges with regard to the practical translation of mussel adhesion.We discuss the anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity, and adhesive behaviors of mussel bio-products and mussel-inspired materials (MIMs) that make them attractive for synthetic adaptation.The development of biologically inspired adhesive interfaces, bioactive mussel products, MIMs, and arising areas of research leading to biomedical applications are considered in this review.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Plasma Bioscience Research Center, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139701, Korea. kaushik.nagendra@kw.ac.kr.

ABSTRACT
The substance secreted by mussels, also known as nature's glue, is a type of liquid protein that hardens rapidly into a solid water-resistant adhesive material. While in seawater or saline conditions, mussels can adhere to all types of surfaces, sustaining its bonds via mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs), a group of proteins containing 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) and catecholic amino acid. Several aspects of this adhesion process have inspired the development of various types of synthetic materials for biomedical applications. Further, there is an urgent need to utilize biologically inspired strategies to develop new biocompatible materials for medical applications. Consequently, many researchers have recently reported bio-inspired techniques and materials that show results similar to or better than those shown by MAPs for a range of medical applications. However, the susceptibility to oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine poses major challenges with regard to the practical translation of mussel adhesion. In this review, various strategies are discussed to provide an option for DOPA/metal ion chelation and to compensate for the limitations imposed by facile 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine autoxidation. We discuss the anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity, and adhesive behaviors of mussel bio-products and mussel-inspired materials (MIMs) that make them attractive for synthetic adaptation. The development of biologically inspired adhesive interfaces, bioactive mussel products, MIMs, and arising areas of research leading to biomedical applications are considered in this review.

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Properties of mussel adhesion: (A) biological adhesion; (B) bio-inspired adhesion on a substrate; and (C) the catechol chemical moiety involved in adhesion.
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marinedrugs-13-06792-f001: Properties of mussel adhesion: (A) biological adhesion; (B) bio-inspired adhesion on a substrate; and (C) the catechol chemical moiety involved in adhesion.

Mentions: Mussel adhesion is a natural process which involves the secretion of a type of protein glue that hardens rapidly into a solid and turns into a water-resistant adhesive [1]. Many features of this process have inspired the development of synthetic materials for medical applications. The mussel secretes sticky glue that allows it to stick to rocks and solid surfaces. The important factor to its stickiness is a group of proteins called mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs) which contain the catecholic amino acid 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) (Figure 1A–C) [2]. “Mussels” are the edible marine bivalves of the family Mytilidae, most of which live on exposed shores in intertidal zones, attached by means of their strong byssal threads to a hard substrate. A byssus refers to a group of strong filaments secreted by mussels when they attach themselves to hard surfaces [2]. Byssal threads, used to attach mussels to substrates, are now known as advanced bonding agents. A number of studies have shown applications of mussel adhesive or glues for industrial and surgical applications [3,4]. Additionally, byssal threads have been investigated in studies about the creation of artificial tendons [5]. Mussel adhesion is mediated by a byssus and by byssal plaques consisting of a complex array of proteins (generally mussel foot proteins, Mfps). The adhesion of Mfps to various surfaces has been widely investigated. For a better understanding of the binding mechanisms of Mfps, researchers explored the force-distance profiles and adhesion energies of three different types of Mfps, termed Mfp-1, Mfp-3, and Mfp-5, on (i) hydrophobic methyl-terminated self-assembled monolayer (CH3-SAM)—and (ii) hydrophilic alcohol-terminated self-assembled monolayer (OH-SAM) surfaces at various pH levels [6]. At an acidic pH, all of the Mfps samples adhered tightly to the CH3-SAM surfaces via hydrophobic interactions but only weakly to the OH-SAM surfaces through H-bonding. DOPA (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) residues in Mfps mediate the binding to both SAM surface types, but through different interactions. The typical bidentate H-bonding by DOPA is disturbed by the longer spacing of OH-SAMs; in contrast, on CH3-SAMs with other nonpolar residues, it partitions to the hydrophobic surface. Asymmetry in the distribution of hydrophobic residues in proteins, the distortion of the bonding on H-bonding surfaces, and the manipulation of physisorbed binding lifetimes are important concepts in the design of adhesives and non-fouling surfaces.


Biomedical and Clinical Importance of Mussel-Inspired Polymers and Materials.

Kaushik NK, Kaushik N, Pardeshi S, Sharma JG, Lee SH, Choi EH - Mar Drugs (2015)

Properties of mussel adhesion: (A) biological adhesion; (B) bio-inspired adhesion on a substrate; and (C) the catechol chemical moiety involved in adhesion.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663554&req=5

marinedrugs-13-06792-f001: Properties of mussel adhesion: (A) biological adhesion; (B) bio-inspired adhesion on a substrate; and (C) the catechol chemical moiety involved in adhesion.
Mentions: Mussel adhesion is a natural process which involves the secretion of a type of protein glue that hardens rapidly into a solid and turns into a water-resistant adhesive [1]. Many features of this process have inspired the development of synthetic materials for medical applications. The mussel secretes sticky glue that allows it to stick to rocks and solid surfaces. The important factor to its stickiness is a group of proteins called mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs) which contain the catecholic amino acid 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) (Figure 1A–C) [2]. “Mussels” are the edible marine bivalves of the family Mytilidae, most of which live on exposed shores in intertidal zones, attached by means of their strong byssal threads to a hard substrate. A byssus refers to a group of strong filaments secreted by mussels when they attach themselves to hard surfaces [2]. Byssal threads, used to attach mussels to substrates, are now known as advanced bonding agents. A number of studies have shown applications of mussel adhesive or glues for industrial and surgical applications [3,4]. Additionally, byssal threads have been investigated in studies about the creation of artificial tendons [5]. Mussel adhesion is mediated by a byssus and by byssal plaques consisting of a complex array of proteins (generally mussel foot proteins, Mfps). The adhesion of Mfps to various surfaces has been widely investigated. For a better understanding of the binding mechanisms of Mfps, researchers explored the force-distance profiles and adhesion energies of three different types of Mfps, termed Mfp-1, Mfp-3, and Mfp-5, on (i) hydrophobic methyl-terminated self-assembled monolayer (CH3-SAM)—and (ii) hydrophilic alcohol-terminated self-assembled monolayer (OH-SAM) surfaces at various pH levels [6]. At an acidic pH, all of the Mfps samples adhered tightly to the CH3-SAM surfaces via hydrophobic interactions but only weakly to the OH-SAM surfaces through H-bonding. DOPA (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) residues in Mfps mediate the binding to both SAM surface types, but through different interactions. The typical bidentate H-bonding by DOPA is disturbed by the longer spacing of OH-SAMs; in contrast, on CH3-SAMs with other nonpolar residues, it partitions to the hydrophobic surface. Asymmetry in the distribution of hydrophobic residues in proteins, the distortion of the bonding on H-bonding surfaces, and the manipulation of physisorbed binding lifetimes are important concepts in the design of adhesives and non-fouling surfaces.

Bottom Line: However, the susceptibility to oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine poses major challenges with regard to the practical translation of mussel adhesion.We discuss the anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity, and adhesive behaviors of mussel bio-products and mussel-inspired materials (MIMs) that make them attractive for synthetic adaptation.The development of biologically inspired adhesive interfaces, bioactive mussel products, MIMs, and arising areas of research leading to biomedical applications are considered in this review.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Plasma Bioscience Research Center, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139701, Korea. kaushik.nagendra@kw.ac.kr.

ABSTRACT
The substance secreted by mussels, also known as nature's glue, is a type of liquid protein that hardens rapidly into a solid water-resistant adhesive material. While in seawater or saline conditions, mussels can adhere to all types of surfaces, sustaining its bonds via mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs), a group of proteins containing 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) and catecholic amino acid. Several aspects of this adhesion process have inspired the development of various types of synthetic materials for biomedical applications. Further, there is an urgent need to utilize biologically inspired strategies to develop new biocompatible materials for medical applications. Consequently, many researchers have recently reported bio-inspired techniques and materials that show results similar to or better than those shown by MAPs for a range of medical applications. However, the susceptibility to oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine poses major challenges with regard to the practical translation of mussel adhesion. In this review, various strategies are discussed to provide an option for DOPA/metal ion chelation and to compensate for the limitations imposed by facile 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine autoxidation. We discuss the anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity, and adhesive behaviors of mussel bio-products and mussel-inspired materials (MIMs) that make them attractive for synthetic adaptation. The development of biologically inspired adhesive interfaces, bioactive mussel products, MIMs, and arising areas of research leading to biomedical applications are considered in this review.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus