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Metabolic and hematological consequences of dietary deoxynivalenol interacting with systemic Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide.

Bannert E, Tesch T, Kluess J, Frahm J, Kersten S, Kahlert S, Renner L, Rothkötter HJ, Dänicke S - Toxins (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: DON-feeding solely decreased portal glucose uptake (p < 0.05).LPS-decreased partial oxygen pressure (pO₂) overall (p < 0.05), but reduced pCO₂ only in arterial blood, and DON had no effect on either.Irrespective of catheter localization, LPS decreased pH and base-excess (p < 0.01), but increased lactate and anion-gap (p < 0.01), indicating an emerging lactic acidosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Animal Nutrition, Friedrich-Loeffler Institute (FLI), Federal Research Institute for Animal Health, Bundesallee 50, Braunschweig 38116, Germany. Erik.Bannert@fli.bund.de.

ABSTRACT
Previous studies have shown that chronic oral deoxynivalenol (DON) exposure modulated Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced systemic inflammation, whereby the liver was suspected to play an important role. Thus, a total of 41 barrows was fed one of two maize-based diets, either a DON-diet (4.59 mg DON/kg feed, n = 19) or a control diet (CON, n = 22). Pigs were equipped with indwelling catheters for pre- or post-hepatic (portal vs. jugular catheter) infusion of either control (0.9% NaCl) or LPS (7.5 µg/kg BW) for 1h and frequent blood sampling. This design yielded six groups: CON_CONjugular‑CONportal, CON_CONjugular‑LPSportal, CON_LPSjugular‑CONportal, DON_CONjugular‑CONportal, DON_CONjugular‑LPSportal and DON_LPSjugular‑CONportal. Blood samples were analyzed for blood gases, electrolytes, glucose, pH, lactate and red hemogram. The red hemogram and electrolytes were not affected by DON and LPS. DON-feeding solely decreased portal glucose uptake (p < 0.05). LPS-decreased partial oxygen pressure (pO₂) overall (p < 0.05), but reduced pCO₂ only in arterial blood, and DON had no effect on either. Irrespective of catheter localization, LPS decreased pH and base-excess (p < 0.01), but increased lactate and anion-gap (p < 0.01), indicating an emerging lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis was more pronounced in the group DON_LPSjugular-CONportal than in CON-fed counterparts (p < 0.05). DON-feeding aggravated the porcine acid-base balance in response to a subsequent immunostimulus dependent on its exposure site (pre- or post-hepatic).

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Effect of chronic enteral Fusarium toxin deoxynivalenol (DON) exposure and pre- or post-hepatic E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion on arterial, jugular or portal blood lactate in pigs. Reference: 0.84 ± 0.24 mmol/L in venous blood [28]. Barrows were either fed a DON contaminated ration (4.59 mg/kg feed) or control feed during 29 days. Infusion groups were divided as follows: pre-hepatic LPS infusion (CON_CONjugular-LPSportal, n = 7 and DON_CONjugular-LPSportal, n = 6), post-hepatic LPS infusion (CON_LPSjugular-CONportal, n = 8 and DON_LPSjugular-CONportal, n = 6), and control infusion (CON_CONjugular-CONportal, n = 7 and DON_CONjugular-CONportal, n = 7). Infusion from time 0 until 60 min with 7.5 µg LPS/kg BW in 0.9% saline. Feed was offered during 15 min prior to infusion start. LSMeans. PSEM = 0.56. Significance: Group (G): p ≤ 0.001; Catheter (C): p = 0.78; Time (T): p ≤ 0.001; G × C × T: p ≤ 0.001. Table illustrates differences between DON and CON fed post-hepatic LPS infused groups at different times. T = trend (p ≤ 0.10).
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toxins-07-04773-f005: Effect of chronic enteral Fusarium toxin deoxynivalenol (DON) exposure and pre- or post-hepatic E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion on arterial, jugular or portal blood lactate in pigs. Reference: 0.84 ± 0.24 mmol/L in venous blood [28]. Barrows were either fed a DON contaminated ration (4.59 mg/kg feed) or control feed during 29 days. Infusion groups were divided as follows: pre-hepatic LPS infusion (CON_CONjugular-LPSportal, n = 7 and DON_CONjugular-LPSportal, n = 6), post-hepatic LPS infusion (CON_LPSjugular-CONportal, n = 8 and DON_LPSjugular-CONportal, n = 6), and control infusion (CON_CONjugular-CONportal, n = 7 and DON_CONjugular-CONportal, n = 7). Infusion from time 0 until 60 min with 7.5 µg LPS/kg BW in 0.9% saline. Feed was offered during 15 min prior to infusion start. LSMeans. PSEM = 0.56. Significance: Group (G): p ≤ 0.001; Catheter (C): p = 0.78; Time (T): p ≤ 0.001; G × C × T: p ≤ 0.001. Table illustrates differences between DON and CON fed post-hepatic LPS infused groups at different times. T = trend (p ≤ 0.10).

Mentions: In all LPS-infused pigs, lactic acidosis was induced, and the acid-base balance variables were altered accordingly (Figure 4, Figure 5, Figure 6, Figure 7 and Figure 8). Compared to the control group (CON_CONjugular-CONportal), pH (Figure 4), bicarbonate (Figure 6) and base excess (BE; Figure 7) decreased and lactate (Figure 5) and anion-gap (AG; Figure 8) increased significantly (p < 0.05). The control group stayed in the physiological range [26] for pH (arterial), lactate (venous) [28], HCO3− (arterial) and AG (venous) [27], but BE (arterial) was above the reference range over the course of the trial with individual variations (5.23 mmol/L ± 0.79; mean ± SE).


Metabolic and hematological consequences of dietary deoxynivalenol interacting with systemic Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide.

Bannert E, Tesch T, Kluess J, Frahm J, Kersten S, Kahlert S, Renner L, Rothkötter HJ, Dänicke S - Toxins (Basel) (2015)

Effect of chronic enteral Fusarium toxin deoxynivalenol (DON) exposure and pre- or post-hepatic E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion on arterial, jugular or portal blood lactate in pigs. Reference: 0.84 ± 0.24 mmol/L in venous blood [28]. Barrows were either fed a DON contaminated ration (4.59 mg/kg feed) or control feed during 29 days. Infusion groups were divided as follows: pre-hepatic LPS infusion (CON_CONjugular-LPSportal, n = 7 and DON_CONjugular-LPSportal, n = 6), post-hepatic LPS infusion (CON_LPSjugular-CONportal, n = 8 and DON_LPSjugular-CONportal, n = 6), and control infusion (CON_CONjugular-CONportal, n = 7 and DON_CONjugular-CONportal, n = 7). Infusion from time 0 until 60 min with 7.5 µg LPS/kg BW in 0.9% saline. Feed was offered during 15 min prior to infusion start. LSMeans. PSEM = 0.56. Significance: Group (G): p ≤ 0.001; Catheter (C): p = 0.78; Time (T): p ≤ 0.001; G × C × T: p ≤ 0.001. Table illustrates differences between DON and CON fed post-hepatic LPS infused groups at different times. T = trend (p ≤ 0.10).
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toxins-07-04773-f005: Effect of chronic enteral Fusarium toxin deoxynivalenol (DON) exposure and pre- or post-hepatic E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion on arterial, jugular or portal blood lactate in pigs. Reference: 0.84 ± 0.24 mmol/L in venous blood [28]. Barrows were either fed a DON contaminated ration (4.59 mg/kg feed) or control feed during 29 days. Infusion groups were divided as follows: pre-hepatic LPS infusion (CON_CONjugular-LPSportal, n = 7 and DON_CONjugular-LPSportal, n = 6), post-hepatic LPS infusion (CON_LPSjugular-CONportal, n = 8 and DON_LPSjugular-CONportal, n = 6), and control infusion (CON_CONjugular-CONportal, n = 7 and DON_CONjugular-CONportal, n = 7). Infusion from time 0 until 60 min with 7.5 µg LPS/kg BW in 0.9% saline. Feed was offered during 15 min prior to infusion start. LSMeans. PSEM = 0.56. Significance: Group (G): p ≤ 0.001; Catheter (C): p = 0.78; Time (T): p ≤ 0.001; G × C × T: p ≤ 0.001. Table illustrates differences between DON and CON fed post-hepatic LPS infused groups at different times. T = trend (p ≤ 0.10).
Mentions: In all LPS-infused pigs, lactic acidosis was induced, and the acid-base balance variables were altered accordingly (Figure 4, Figure 5, Figure 6, Figure 7 and Figure 8). Compared to the control group (CON_CONjugular-CONportal), pH (Figure 4), bicarbonate (Figure 6) and base excess (BE; Figure 7) decreased and lactate (Figure 5) and anion-gap (AG; Figure 8) increased significantly (p < 0.05). The control group stayed in the physiological range [26] for pH (arterial), lactate (venous) [28], HCO3− (arterial) and AG (venous) [27], but BE (arterial) was above the reference range over the course of the trial with individual variations (5.23 mmol/L ± 0.79; mean ± SE).

Bottom Line: DON-feeding solely decreased portal glucose uptake (p < 0.05).LPS-decreased partial oxygen pressure (pO₂) overall (p < 0.05), but reduced pCO₂ only in arterial blood, and DON had no effect on either.Irrespective of catheter localization, LPS decreased pH and base-excess (p < 0.01), but increased lactate and anion-gap (p < 0.01), indicating an emerging lactic acidosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Animal Nutrition, Friedrich-Loeffler Institute (FLI), Federal Research Institute for Animal Health, Bundesallee 50, Braunschweig 38116, Germany. Erik.Bannert@fli.bund.de.

ABSTRACT
Previous studies have shown that chronic oral deoxynivalenol (DON) exposure modulated Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced systemic inflammation, whereby the liver was suspected to play an important role. Thus, a total of 41 barrows was fed one of two maize-based diets, either a DON-diet (4.59 mg DON/kg feed, n = 19) or a control diet (CON, n = 22). Pigs were equipped with indwelling catheters for pre- or post-hepatic (portal vs. jugular catheter) infusion of either control (0.9% NaCl) or LPS (7.5 µg/kg BW) for 1h and frequent blood sampling. This design yielded six groups: CON_CONjugular‑CONportal, CON_CONjugular‑LPSportal, CON_LPSjugular‑CONportal, DON_CONjugular‑CONportal, DON_CONjugular‑LPSportal and DON_LPSjugular‑CONportal. Blood samples were analyzed for blood gases, electrolytes, glucose, pH, lactate and red hemogram. The red hemogram and electrolytes were not affected by DON and LPS. DON-feeding solely decreased portal glucose uptake (p < 0.05). LPS-decreased partial oxygen pressure (pO₂) overall (p < 0.05), but reduced pCO₂ only in arterial blood, and DON had no effect on either. Irrespective of catheter localization, LPS decreased pH and base-excess (p < 0.01), but increased lactate and anion-gap (p < 0.01), indicating an emerging lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis was more pronounced in the group DON_LPSjugular-CONportal than in CON-fed counterparts (p < 0.05). DON-feeding aggravated the porcine acid-base balance in response to a subsequent immunostimulus dependent on its exposure site (pre- or post-hepatic).

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus