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Metabolic and hematological consequences of dietary deoxynivalenol interacting with systemic Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide.

Bannert E, Tesch T, Kluess J, Frahm J, Kersten S, Kahlert S, Renner L, Rothkötter HJ, Dänicke S - Toxins (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: DON-feeding solely decreased portal glucose uptake (p < 0.05).LPS-decreased partial oxygen pressure (pO₂) overall (p < 0.05), but reduced pCO₂ only in arterial blood, and DON had no effect on either.Irrespective of catheter localization, LPS decreased pH and base-excess (p < 0.01), but increased lactate and anion-gap (p < 0.01), indicating an emerging lactic acidosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Animal Nutrition, Friedrich-Loeffler Institute (FLI), Federal Research Institute for Animal Health, Bundesallee 50, Braunschweig 38116, Germany. Erik.Bannert@fli.bund.de.

ABSTRACT
Previous studies have shown that chronic oral deoxynivalenol (DON) exposure modulated Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced systemic inflammation, whereby the liver was suspected to play an important role. Thus, a total of 41 barrows was fed one of two maize-based diets, either a DON-diet (4.59 mg DON/kg feed, n = 19) or a control diet (CON, n = 22). Pigs were equipped with indwelling catheters for pre- or post-hepatic (portal vs. jugular catheter) infusion of either control (0.9% NaCl) or LPS (7.5 µg/kg BW) for 1h and frequent blood sampling. This design yielded six groups: CON_CONjugular‑CONportal, CON_CONjugular‑LPSportal, CON_LPSjugular‑CONportal, DON_CONjugular‑CONportal, DON_CONjugular‑LPSportal and DON_LPSjugular‑CONportal. Blood samples were analyzed for blood gases, electrolytes, glucose, pH, lactate and red hemogram. The red hemogram and electrolytes were not affected by DON and LPS. DON-feeding solely decreased portal glucose uptake (p < 0.05). LPS-decreased partial oxygen pressure (pO₂) overall (p < 0.05), but reduced pCO₂ only in arterial blood, and DON had no effect on either. Irrespective of catheter localization, LPS decreased pH and base-excess (p < 0.01), but increased lactate and anion-gap (p < 0.01), indicating an emerging lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis was more pronounced in the group DON_LPSjugular-CONportal than in CON-fed counterparts (p < 0.05). DON-feeding aggravated the porcine acid-base balance in response to a subsequent immunostimulus dependent on its exposure site (pre- or post-hepatic).

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Effect of chronic enteral Fusarium toxin deoxynivalenol (DON) exposure and pre- or post-hepatic E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion on arterial, jugular or portal blood partial oxygen pressure (pO2) in pigs. Reference value: 98 mmHg in arterial blood [26]. Barrows were either fed a DON contaminated ration (4.59 mg/kg feed) or control feed during 29 days. Infusion groups were divided as follows: pre-hepatic LPS infusion (CON_CONjugular-LPSportal, n = 7 and DON_CONjugular-LPSportal, n = 6), post-hepatic LPS infusion (CON_LPSjugular-CONportal, n = 8 and DON_LPSjugular-CONportal, n = 6), and control infusion (CON_CONjugular-CONportal, n = 7 and DON_CONjugular-CONportal, n = 7). Infusion from time 0 until 60 min with 7.5 µg LPS/kg BW in 0.9% saline. Feed was offered during 15 min prior to infusion start. LSMeans. PSEM = 2.89. Significance: Group (G): p = 0.003; Catheter (C): p ≤ 0.001; Time (T): p ≤ 0.001; G × C × T: p ≤ 0.001.
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toxins-07-04773-f001: Effect of chronic enteral Fusarium toxin deoxynivalenol (DON) exposure and pre- or post-hepatic E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion on arterial, jugular or portal blood partial oxygen pressure (pO2) in pigs. Reference value: 98 mmHg in arterial blood [26]. Barrows were either fed a DON contaminated ration (4.59 mg/kg feed) or control feed during 29 days. Infusion groups were divided as follows: pre-hepatic LPS infusion (CON_CONjugular-LPSportal, n = 7 and DON_CONjugular-LPSportal, n = 6), post-hepatic LPS infusion (CON_LPSjugular-CONportal, n = 8 and DON_LPSjugular-CONportal, n = 6), and control infusion (CON_CONjugular-CONportal, n = 7 and DON_CONjugular-CONportal, n = 7). Infusion from time 0 until 60 min with 7.5 µg LPS/kg BW in 0.9% saline. Feed was offered during 15 min prior to infusion start. LSMeans. PSEM = 2.89. Significance: Group (G): p = 0.003; Catheter (C): p ≤ 0.001; Time (T): p ≤ 0.001; G × C × T: p ≤ 0.001.

Mentions: Arterial, jugular and portal partial oxygen pressures (pO2) are illustrated in Figure 1. On average, partial O2 pressures of the control group were 92.42 mmHg in arterial, 36.07 mmHg in jugular and 43.08 mmHg in portal blood (SEM = 1.21), respectively. The arterial pO2 was near the physiological reference value of 98 mmHg [26]. Between 15 and 60 min, a general decrease in pO2 in all LPS-infused groups (compared to their control groups) was observed at all infusion sites (p < 0.05), which started to return to base level at 60 min. The decrease was most pronounced in arterial blood. Thereafter, a subsequent increase in pO2 in all LPS-infused groups until 180 min was observed (p < 0.05). At jugular and portal sampling sites, pO2 decreased after 90 min, again below the control group level, and decreased thereafter until 120 min in jugular (p < 0.05) and 180 min in portal (p < 0.05) blood. A significant effect of DON exposure on arterial pO2 was observed at 60 min with pre-hepatic LPS-infused control-fed pigs starting to return to base level earlier than their DON-fed counter parts (p < 0.01). No effect of DON treatment was observed in post-hepatic infused animals. No DON effects were observed on jugular and portal pO2. Portal pO2 pressures were subjected more to fluctuations compared to arterial and portal pO2.


Metabolic and hematological consequences of dietary deoxynivalenol interacting with systemic Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide.

Bannert E, Tesch T, Kluess J, Frahm J, Kersten S, Kahlert S, Renner L, Rothkötter HJ, Dänicke S - Toxins (Basel) (2015)

Effect of chronic enteral Fusarium toxin deoxynivalenol (DON) exposure and pre- or post-hepatic E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion on arterial, jugular or portal blood partial oxygen pressure (pO2) in pigs. Reference value: 98 mmHg in arterial blood [26]. Barrows were either fed a DON contaminated ration (4.59 mg/kg feed) or control feed during 29 days. Infusion groups were divided as follows: pre-hepatic LPS infusion (CON_CONjugular-LPSportal, n = 7 and DON_CONjugular-LPSportal, n = 6), post-hepatic LPS infusion (CON_LPSjugular-CONportal, n = 8 and DON_LPSjugular-CONportal, n = 6), and control infusion (CON_CONjugular-CONportal, n = 7 and DON_CONjugular-CONportal, n = 7). Infusion from time 0 until 60 min with 7.5 µg LPS/kg BW in 0.9% saline. Feed was offered during 15 min prior to infusion start. LSMeans. PSEM = 2.89. Significance: Group (G): p = 0.003; Catheter (C): p ≤ 0.001; Time (T): p ≤ 0.001; G × C × T: p ≤ 0.001.
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toxins-07-04773-f001: Effect of chronic enteral Fusarium toxin deoxynivalenol (DON) exposure and pre- or post-hepatic E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion on arterial, jugular or portal blood partial oxygen pressure (pO2) in pigs. Reference value: 98 mmHg in arterial blood [26]. Barrows were either fed a DON contaminated ration (4.59 mg/kg feed) or control feed during 29 days. Infusion groups were divided as follows: pre-hepatic LPS infusion (CON_CONjugular-LPSportal, n = 7 and DON_CONjugular-LPSportal, n = 6), post-hepatic LPS infusion (CON_LPSjugular-CONportal, n = 8 and DON_LPSjugular-CONportal, n = 6), and control infusion (CON_CONjugular-CONportal, n = 7 and DON_CONjugular-CONportal, n = 7). Infusion from time 0 until 60 min with 7.5 µg LPS/kg BW in 0.9% saline. Feed was offered during 15 min prior to infusion start. LSMeans. PSEM = 2.89. Significance: Group (G): p = 0.003; Catheter (C): p ≤ 0.001; Time (T): p ≤ 0.001; G × C × T: p ≤ 0.001.
Mentions: Arterial, jugular and portal partial oxygen pressures (pO2) are illustrated in Figure 1. On average, partial O2 pressures of the control group were 92.42 mmHg in arterial, 36.07 mmHg in jugular and 43.08 mmHg in portal blood (SEM = 1.21), respectively. The arterial pO2 was near the physiological reference value of 98 mmHg [26]. Between 15 and 60 min, a general decrease in pO2 in all LPS-infused groups (compared to their control groups) was observed at all infusion sites (p < 0.05), which started to return to base level at 60 min. The decrease was most pronounced in arterial blood. Thereafter, a subsequent increase in pO2 in all LPS-infused groups until 180 min was observed (p < 0.05). At jugular and portal sampling sites, pO2 decreased after 90 min, again below the control group level, and decreased thereafter until 120 min in jugular (p < 0.05) and 180 min in portal (p < 0.05) blood. A significant effect of DON exposure on arterial pO2 was observed at 60 min with pre-hepatic LPS-infused control-fed pigs starting to return to base level earlier than their DON-fed counter parts (p < 0.01). No effect of DON treatment was observed in post-hepatic infused animals. No DON effects were observed on jugular and portal pO2. Portal pO2 pressures were subjected more to fluctuations compared to arterial and portal pO2.

Bottom Line: DON-feeding solely decreased portal glucose uptake (p < 0.05).LPS-decreased partial oxygen pressure (pO₂) overall (p < 0.05), but reduced pCO₂ only in arterial blood, and DON had no effect on either.Irrespective of catheter localization, LPS decreased pH and base-excess (p < 0.01), but increased lactate and anion-gap (p < 0.01), indicating an emerging lactic acidosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Animal Nutrition, Friedrich-Loeffler Institute (FLI), Federal Research Institute for Animal Health, Bundesallee 50, Braunschweig 38116, Germany. Erik.Bannert@fli.bund.de.

ABSTRACT
Previous studies have shown that chronic oral deoxynivalenol (DON) exposure modulated Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced systemic inflammation, whereby the liver was suspected to play an important role. Thus, a total of 41 barrows was fed one of two maize-based diets, either a DON-diet (4.59 mg DON/kg feed, n = 19) or a control diet (CON, n = 22). Pigs were equipped with indwelling catheters for pre- or post-hepatic (portal vs. jugular catheter) infusion of either control (0.9% NaCl) or LPS (7.5 µg/kg BW) for 1h and frequent blood sampling. This design yielded six groups: CON_CONjugular‑CONportal, CON_CONjugular‑LPSportal, CON_LPSjugular‑CONportal, DON_CONjugular‑CONportal, DON_CONjugular‑LPSportal and DON_LPSjugular‑CONportal. Blood samples were analyzed for blood gases, electrolytes, glucose, pH, lactate and red hemogram. The red hemogram and electrolytes were not affected by DON and LPS. DON-feeding solely decreased portal glucose uptake (p < 0.05). LPS-decreased partial oxygen pressure (pO₂) overall (p < 0.05), but reduced pCO₂ only in arterial blood, and DON had no effect on either. Irrespective of catheter localization, LPS decreased pH and base-excess (p < 0.01), but increased lactate and anion-gap (p < 0.01), indicating an emerging lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis was more pronounced in the group DON_LPSjugular-CONportal than in CON-fed counterparts (p < 0.05). DON-feeding aggravated the porcine acid-base balance in response to a subsequent immunostimulus dependent on its exposure site (pre- or post-hepatic).

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus