Limits...
Sample storage-induced changes in the quantity and quality of soil labile organic carbon.

Sun SQ, Cai HY, Chang SX, Bhatti JS - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: We studied the effects of air-drying and frozen storage on cold and hot water soluble organic carbon (WSOC).Air-drying but not frozen storage increased the concentrations of cold-WSOC and carbohydrate in cold-WSOC, while both increased polyphenol concentrations.In contrast, only polyphenol concentration in hot-WSOC was increased by air-drying and frozen storage, suggesting that hot-WSOC was less affected by sample storage.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Mountain Surface Processes and Ecological Regulation, Institute of Mountain Hazards and Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 9, Block 4, South Renmin Rd., Chengdu, 610041 China.

ABSTRACT
Effects of sample storage methods on the quantity and quality of labile soil organic carbon are not fully understood even though their effects on basic soil properties have been extensively studied. We studied the effects of air-drying and frozen storage on cold and hot water soluble organic carbon (WSOC). Cold- and hot-WSOC in air-dried and frozen-stored soils were linearly correlated with those in fresh soils, indicating that storage proportionally altered the extractability of soil organic carbon. Air-drying but not frozen storage increased the concentrations of cold-WSOC and carbohydrate in cold-WSOC, while both increased polyphenol concentrations. In contrast, only polyphenol concentration in hot-WSOC was increased by air-drying and frozen storage, suggesting that hot-WSOC was less affected by sample storage. The biodegradability of cold- but not hot-WSOC was increased by air-drying, while both air-drying and frozen storage increased humification index and changed specific UV absorbance of both cold- and hot-WSOC, indicating shifts in the quality of soil WSOC. Our results suggest that storage methods affect the quantity and quality of WSOC but not comparisons between samples, frozen storage is better than air-drying if samples have to be stored, and storage should be avoided whenever possible when studying the quantity and quality of both cold- and hot-WSOC.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Relationships of cold- and hot-WSOC concentrations between air-dried (AD) andfresh soils (FS) and between frozen-stored (FZ) and fresh soils. WSOC, watersoluble organic carbon.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663495&req=5

f2: Relationships of cold- and hot-WSOC concentrations between air-dried (AD) andfresh soils (FS) and between frozen-stored (FZ) and fresh soils. WSOC, watersoluble organic carbon.

Mentions: Sample storage methods affected cold-WSOC (F2,22 = 28.9,P < 0.001) and its carbohydrateconcentrations (F2, 22 = 25.2,P <  0.001) (Fig. 1, Table 1). Air-dryingresulted in the highest concentrations of WSOC and its carbohydrateconcentrations in cold-WSOC. The amount of cold-WSOC in the air-dried soils waslinearly correlated with that in the fresh soils (two-tailed test,R2 = 0.89,P < 0.001) (Fig. 2).Frozen storage did not significantly alter the concentration of WSOC and that ofcarbohydrate in cold-WSOC (Fig. 1a,c). Both air-drying(P < 0.001) and frozen storage(P = 0.002) increased the concentration ofpolyphenol in cold-WSOC, with the highest value in the air-dried followed bythat in the frozen-stored samples (Fig. 1e). In contrast,neither air-drying nor frozen storage influenced the concentration of WSOC orits carbohydrate concentrations in hot-WSOC (Fig. 1d,e).However, increases in the polyphenol concentration were observed in hot-WSOC inboth the air-dried (P = 0.001) and thefrozen-stored soils (P = 0.002) (Fig. 1f).


Sample storage-induced changes in the quantity and quality of soil labile organic carbon.

Sun SQ, Cai HY, Chang SX, Bhatti JS - Sci Rep (2015)

Relationships of cold- and hot-WSOC concentrations between air-dried (AD) andfresh soils (FS) and between frozen-stored (FZ) and fresh soils. WSOC, watersoluble organic carbon.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663495&req=5

f2: Relationships of cold- and hot-WSOC concentrations between air-dried (AD) andfresh soils (FS) and between frozen-stored (FZ) and fresh soils. WSOC, watersoluble organic carbon.
Mentions: Sample storage methods affected cold-WSOC (F2,22 = 28.9,P < 0.001) and its carbohydrateconcentrations (F2, 22 = 25.2,P <  0.001) (Fig. 1, Table 1). Air-dryingresulted in the highest concentrations of WSOC and its carbohydrateconcentrations in cold-WSOC. The amount of cold-WSOC in the air-dried soils waslinearly correlated with that in the fresh soils (two-tailed test,R2 = 0.89,P < 0.001) (Fig. 2).Frozen storage did not significantly alter the concentration of WSOC and that ofcarbohydrate in cold-WSOC (Fig. 1a,c). Both air-drying(P < 0.001) and frozen storage(P = 0.002) increased the concentration ofpolyphenol in cold-WSOC, with the highest value in the air-dried followed bythat in the frozen-stored samples (Fig. 1e). In contrast,neither air-drying nor frozen storage influenced the concentration of WSOC orits carbohydrate concentrations in hot-WSOC (Fig. 1d,e).However, increases in the polyphenol concentration were observed in hot-WSOC inboth the air-dried (P = 0.001) and thefrozen-stored soils (P = 0.002) (Fig. 1f).

Bottom Line: We studied the effects of air-drying and frozen storage on cold and hot water soluble organic carbon (WSOC).Air-drying but not frozen storage increased the concentrations of cold-WSOC and carbohydrate in cold-WSOC, while both increased polyphenol concentrations.In contrast, only polyphenol concentration in hot-WSOC was increased by air-drying and frozen storage, suggesting that hot-WSOC was less affected by sample storage.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Mountain Surface Processes and Ecological Regulation, Institute of Mountain Hazards and Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 9, Block 4, South Renmin Rd., Chengdu, 610041 China.

ABSTRACT
Effects of sample storage methods on the quantity and quality of labile soil organic carbon are not fully understood even though their effects on basic soil properties have been extensively studied. We studied the effects of air-drying and frozen storage on cold and hot water soluble organic carbon (WSOC). Cold- and hot-WSOC in air-dried and frozen-stored soils were linearly correlated with those in fresh soils, indicating that storage proportionally altered the extractability of soil organic carbon. Air-drying but not frozen storage increased the concentrations of cold-WSOC and carbohydrate in cold-WSOC, while both increased polyphenol concentrations. In contrast, only polyphenol concentration in hot-WSOC was increased by air-drying and frozen storage, suggesting that hot-WSOC was less affected by sample storage. The biodegradability of cold- but not hot-WSOC was increased by air-drying, while both air-drying and frozen storage increased humification index and changed specific UV absorbance of both cold- and hot-WSOC, indicating shifts in the quality of soil WSOC. Our results suggest that storage methods affect the quantity and quality of WSOC but not comparisons between samples, frozen storage is better than air-drying if samples have to be stored, and storage should be avoided whenever possible when studying the quantity and quality of both cold- and hot-WSOC.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus