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Zeolite Nanoparticles for Selective Sorption of Plasma Proteins.

Rahimi M, Ng EP, Bakhtiari K, Vinciguerra M, Ali Ahmad H, Awala H, Mintova S, Daghighi M, Bakhshandeh Rostami F, de Vries M, Motazacker MM, Peppelenbosch MP, Mahmoudi M, Rezaee F - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: While the zeolite nanoparticles exposed to low plasma concentration (10%) exhibited a high selective adsorption for immunoglobulin gamma (i.e. IGHG1, IGHG2 and IGHG4) proteins.The zeolite nanoparticles can potentially be used for selectively capture of APOC-III in order to reduce the activation of lipoprotein lipase inhibition during hypertriglyceridemia treatment.The zeolite nanoparticles can be adapted to hemophilic patients (hemophilia A (F-VIII deficient) and hemophilia B (F-IX deficient)) with a risk of bleeding, and thus might be potentially used in combination with the existing therapy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Science, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
The affinity of zeolite nanoparticles (diameter of 8-12 nm) possessing high surface area and high pore volume towards human plasma proteins has been investigated. The protein composition (corona) of zeolite nanoparticles has been shown to be more dependent on the plasma protein concentrations and the type of zeolites than zeolite nanoparticles concentration. The number of proteins present in the corona of zeolite nanoparticles at 100% plasma (in vivo state) is less than with 10% plasma exposure. This could be due to a competition between the proteins to occupy the corona of the zeolite nanoparticles. Moreover, a high selective adsorption for apolipoprotein C-III (APOC-III) and fibrinogen on the zeolite nanoparticles at high plasma concentration (100%) was observed. While the zeolite nanoparticles exposed to low plasma concentration (10%) exhibited a high selective adsorption for immunoglobulin gamma (i.e. IGHG1, IGHG2 and IGHG4) proteins. The zeolite nanoparticles can potentially be used for selectively capture of APOC-III in order to reduce the activation of lipoprotein lipase inhibition during hypertriglyceridemia treatment. The zeolite nanoparticles can be adapted to hemophilic patients (hemophilia A (F-VIII deficient) and hemophilia B (F-IX deficient)) with a risk of bleeding, and thus might be potentially used in combination with the existing therapy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Zeta potential curves of EMT- and FAU-zeolite suspensions, and transmission electron micrographs of (b) EMT- and (c) FAU-zeolite nanoparticles.
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f1: (a) Zeta potential curves of EMT- and FAU-zeolite suspensions, and transmission electron micrographs of (b) EMT- and (c) FAU-zeolite nanoparticles.

Mentions: High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were used to study the size and morphology of the zeolite nanocrystals. Discrete octahedral FAU- and hexagonal EMT- zeolite nanocrystals with an average diameter in the range of 8–12 nm are shown in Figure 1. Both the EMT- and FAU- zeolite nanocrystals have well developed crystalline faces. Moreover they appear as single crystals, and no crystals intergrowth was observed, which is in a good accordance with the zeta potential measurements and scanning electron microscopy study (Figure S1). The zeta potential values measured for the EMT- and FAU- zeolite nanoparticles of −44 and −50 mV, respectively, correspond to colloidal samples containing highly stable non-agglomerated crystals (Figure 1). On the other side the negative zeta potential value represent particles with negative surface charge. The surface charges of the zeolite nanoparticles are expected to play an important role in the interactions with human plasma proteins. Therefore the surface charge and charge density of both zeolite nanoparticles were determined. Both samples have almost identical surface charge density, i.e., −0.50 mC/m2 and −0.58 mC/m2 for EMT- and FAU- zeolite crystals respectively (Table 1a), while the surface charge of FAU- zeolite nanoparticles is higher (−299 mC/g) than the EMT- zeolite (−235 mC/g) (Table 1a). This can be explained with the different specific surface area of the EMT- and FAU- zeolite nanocrystals (Table 1a). The surface charge of the zeolite nanoparticles is negative, which is consistent with their high hydrophilicity. Additionally, the porosity of the zeolite nanocrystals was evaluated by nitrogen sorption measurements carried out at −196 °C (Figure 2). The N2 sorption isotherms of both samples resembled Type I and Type IV isotherms, indicating the presence of micropores and mesopores (textural porosity); the mesopores with an average diameter of 25 nm are originated from the close packing of the zeolite nanocrystals. The results extracted from the N2 sorption isotherms for EMT- and FAU- zeolite nanoparticles are summarized in Table 1. The BET specific surface area of FAU- zeolite nanoparticles is 845 m2/g, which is higher than for the EMT- zeolite nanoparticles (570 m2/g). The external surface area of EMT- and FAU-zeolite nanoparticles is 220 m2/g and 235 m2/g, respectively, which contributed of approximately 30 - 40% of their specific surface area. In addition, both samples have high total pore volume, i.e., for the EMT zeolite is 0.89 cm3/g and for the FAU zeolite is 1.27 cm3/g, which will be further beneficial for the selective sorption toward human plasma proteins.


Zeolite Nanoparticles for Selective Sorption of Plasma Proteins.

Rahimi M, Ng EP, Bakhtiari K, Vinciguerra M, Ali Ahmad H, Awala H, Mintova S, Daghighi M, Bakhshandeh Rostami F, de Vries M, Motazacker MM, Peppelenbosch MP, Mahmoudi M, Rezaee F - Sci Rep (2015)

(a) Zeta potential curves of EMT- and FAU-zeolite suspensions, and transmission electron micrographs of (b) EMT- and (c) FAU-zeolite nanoparticles.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663482&req=5

f1: (a) Zeta potential curves of EMT- and FAU-zeolite suspensions, and transmission electron micrographs of (b) EMT- and (c) FAU-zeolite nanoparticles.
Mentions: High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were used to study the size and morphology of the zeolite nanocrystals. Discrete octahedral FAU- and hexagonal EMT- zeolite nanocrystals with an average diameter in the range of 8–12 nm are shown in Figure 1. Both the EMT- and FAU- zeolite nanocrystals have well developed crystalline faces. Moreover they appear as single crystals, and no crystals intergrowth was observed, which is in a good accordance with the zeta potential measurements and scanning electron microscopy study (Figure S1). The zeta potential values measured for the EMT- and FAU- zeolite nanoparticles of −44 and −50 mV, respectively, correspond to colloidal samples containing highly stable non-agglomerated crystals (Figure 1). On the other side the negative zeta potential value represent particles with negative surface charge. The surface charges of the zeolite nanoparticles are expected to play an important role in the interactions with human plasma proteins. Therefore the surface charge and charge density of both zeolite nanoparticles were determined. Both samples have almost identical surface charge density, i.e., −0.50 mC/m2 and −0.58 mC/m2 for EMT- and FAU- zeolite crystals respectively (Table 1a), while the surface charge of FAU- zeolite nanoparticles is higher (−299 mC/g) than the EMT- zeolite (−235 mC/g) (Table 1a). This can be explained with the different specific surface area of the EMT- and FAU- zeolite nanocrystals (Table 1a). The surface charge of the zeolite nanoparticles is negative, which is consistent with their high hydrophilicity. Additionally, the porosity of the zeolite nanocrystals was evaluated by nitrogen sorption measurements carried out at −196 °C (Figure 2). The N2 sorption isotherms of both samples resembled Type I and Type IV isotherms, indicating the presence of micropores and mesopores (textural porosity); the mesopores with an average diameter of 25 nm are originated from the close packing of the zeolite nanocrystals. The results extracted from the N2 sorption isotherms for EMT- and FAU- zeolite nanoparticles are summarized in Table 1. The BET specific surface area of FAU- zeolite nanoparticles is 845 m2/g, which is higher than for the EMT- zeolite nanoparticles (570 m2/g). The external surface area of EMT- and FAU-zeolite nanoparticles is 220 m2/g and 235 m2/g, respectively, which contributed of approximately 30 - 40% of their specific surface area. In addition, both samples have high total pore volume, i.e., for the EMT zeolite is 0.89 cm3/g and for the FAU zeolite is 1.27 cm3/g, which will be further beneficial for the selective sorption toward human plasma proteins.

Bottom Line: While the zeolite nanoparticles exposed to low plasma concentration (10%) exhibited a high selective adsorption for immunoglobulin gamma (i.e. IGHG1, IGHG2 and IGHG4) proteins.The zeolite nanoparticles can potentially be used for selectively capture of APOC-III in order to reduce the activation of lipoprotein lipase inhibition during hypertriglyceridemia treatment.The zeolite nanoparticles can be adapted to hemophilic patients (hemophilia A (F-VIII deficient) and hemophilia B (F-IX deficient)) with a risk of bleeding, and thus might be potentially used in combination with the existing therapy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Science, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
The affinity of zeolite nanoparticles (diameter of 8-12 nm) possessing high surface area and high pore volume towards human plasma proteins has been investigated. The protein composition (corona) of zeolite nanoparticles has been shown to be more dependent on the plasma protein concentrations and the type of zeolites than zeolite nanoparticles concentration. The number of proteins present in the corona of zeolite nanoparticles at 100% plasma (in vivo state) is less than with 10% plasma exposure. This could be due to a competition between the proteins to occupy the corona of the zeolite nanoparticles. Moreover, a high selective adsorption for apolipoprotein C-III (APOC-III) and fibrinogen on the zeolite nanoparticles at high plasma concentration (100%) was observed. While the zeolite nanoparticles exposed to low plasma concentration (10%) exhibited a high selective adsorption for immunoglobulin gamma (i.e. IGHG1, IGHG2 and IGHG4) proteins. The zeolite nanoparticles can potentially be used for selectively capture of APOC-III in order to reduce the activation of lipoprotein lipase inhibition during hypertriglyceridemia treatment. The zeolite nanoparticles can be adapted to hemophilic patients (hemophilia A (F-VIII deficient) and hemophilia B (F-IX deficient)) with a risk of bleeding, and thus might be potentially used in combination with the existing therapy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus