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Where children and adolescents drown in Queensland: a population-based study.

Wallis BA, Watt K, Franklin RC, Nixon JW, Kimble RM - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Toddlers 0-4 years were most at risk around pools (23.94/100,000), and static water bodies such as dams and buckets-the fatality ratios were highest at these 2 locations for this age group.Most mortality and morbidity could have been prevented by improving water safety through engaged supervision around pools and bath time, and a heightened awareness of buckets and man-made water hazards around the farm home for young children.These data provide a different approach to inform prevention strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Children's Burns & Trauma Research, Queensland University Child Health Research Centre, Lady Cilento Children's Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia Dept of Paediatric Surgery, Urology, Burns & Trauma, Lady Cilento Children's Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

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Drowning location by remoteness (ARIA)* of geographic location of event, Queensland 2002–2008 (n=1088). *ARIA (Accessibility/Remoteness Index of Australia) utilised postcode of the location of the drowning event. Data on man-made water hazards presented in this figure but for analyses this category was collapsed into missing.
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BMJOPEN2015008959F1: Drowning location by remoteness (ARIA)* of geographic location of event, Queensland 2002–2008 (n=1088). *ARIA (Accessibility/Remoteness Index of Australia) utilised postcode of the location of the drowning event. Data on man-made water hazards presented in this figure but for analyses this category was collapsed into missing.

Mentions: Figure 1 shows the proportion of drowning events that occurred at specific sites in the state of Queensland by remoteness (ARIA). Pools were the most frequent drowning location for all geographic regions, with the majority occurring in major cities (33%), regional (24%) and remote (2%; χ2=28.23, df=6, p<0.001). All other drowning occurred at sites in similar proportions across the geographic regions.


Where children and adolescents drown in Queensland: a population-based study.

Wallis BA, Watt K, Franklin RC, Nixon JW, Kimble RM - BMJ Open (2015)

Drowning location by remoteness (ARIA)* of geographic location of event, Queensland 2002–2008 (n=1088). *ARIA (Accessibility/Remoteness Index of Australia) utilised postcode of the location of the drowning event. Data on man-made water hazards presented in this figure but for analyses this category was collapsed into missing.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663452&req=5

BMJOPEN2015008959F1: Drowning location by remoteness (ARIA)* of geographic location of event, Queensland 2002–2008 (n=1088). *ARIA (Accessibility/Remoteness Index of Australia) utilised postcode of the location of the drowning event. Data on man-made water hazards presented in this figure but for analyses this category was collapsed into missing.
Mentions: Figure 1 shows the proportion of drowning events that occurred at specific sites in the state of Queensland by remoteness (ARIA). Pools were the most frequent drowning location for all geographic regions, with the majority occurring in major cities (33%), regional (24%) and remote (2%; χ2=28.23, df=6, p<0.001). All other drowning occurred at sites in similar proportions across the geographic regions.

Bottom Line: Toddlers 0-4 years were most at risk around pools (23.94/100,000), and static water bodies such as dams and buckets-the fatality ratios were highest at these 2 locations for this age group.Most mortality and morbidity could have been prevented by improving water safety through engaged supervision around pools and bath time, and a heightened awareness of buckets and man-made water hazards around the farm home for young children.These data provide a different approach to inform prevention strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Children's Burns & Trauma Research, Queensland University Child Health Research Centre, Lady Cilento Children's Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia Dept of Paediatric Surgery, Urology, Burns & Trauma, Lady Cilento Children's Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus