Limits...
Preschool children's vision screening in New Zealand: a retrospective evaluation of referral accuracy.

Langeslag-Smith MA, Vandal AC, Briane V, Thompson B, Anstice NS - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Screening produced high numbers of false positive referrals, resulting in poor positive predictive value (PPV=31%, 95% CI 26% to 38%).Relaxing the referral criteria for acuity from worse than 6/9 to worse than 6/12 improved PPV without adversely affecting NPV.There is scope for reducing costs by altering the visual acuity criterion for referral.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Counties Manukau District Health Board, Auckland, New Zealand.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Boxplot representing the level of unaided visual acuity (UVA) for children with refractive errors, unexplained reduced UVA and for those discharged after the initial consultation. The width of each boxplot corresponds to the number of observations, although some children had more than one refractive diagnosis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663450&req=5

BMJOPEN2015009207F3: Boxplot representing the level of unaided visual acuity (UVA) for children with refractive errors, unexplained reduced UVA and for those discharged after the initial consultation. The width of each boxplot corresponds to the number of observations, although some children had more than one refractive diagnosis.

Mentions: Reduced UVA was present at the hospital eye assessment in all children with myopia; however, 12 children with other refractive errors had UVA better than 6/9 (0.18 logMAR). FigureĀ 3 demonstrates that that the different ocular diagnoses, including unexplained reduced UVA, had overlapping acuity levels. Therefore, UVA alone could not be used to differentiate between different visual disorders. Even when acuity was measured with standardised charts by experienced eye care providers, there was no reliable difference in UVA in children with refractive error and those with unexplained reduced UVA which normalised over time.


Preschool children's vision screening in New Zealand: a retrospective evaluation of referral accuracy.

Langeslag-Smith MA, Vandal AC, Briane V, Thompson B, Anstice NS - BMJ Open (2015)

Boxplot representing the level of unaided visual acuity (UVA) for children with refractive errors, unexplained reduced UVA and for those discharged after the initial consultation. The width of each boxplot corresponds to the number of observations, although some children had more than one refractive diagnosis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663450&req=5

BMJOPEN2015009207F3: Boxplot representing the level of unaided visual acuity (UVA) for children with refractive errors, unexplained reduced UVA and for those discharged after the initial consultation. The width of each boxplot corresponds to the number of observations, although some children had more than one refractive diagnosis.
Mentions: Reduced UVA was present at the hospital eye assessment in all children with myopia; however, 12 children with other refractive errors had UVA better than 6/9 (0.18 logMAR). FigureĀ 3 demonstrates that that the different ocular diagnoses, including unexplained reduced UVA, had overlapping acuity levels. Therefore, UVA alone could not be used to differentiate between different visual disorders. Even when acuity was measured with standardised charts by experienced eye care providers, there was no reliable difference in UVA in children with refractive error and those with unexplained reduced UVA which normalised over time.

Bottom Line: Screening produced high numbers of false positive referrals, resulting in poor positive predictive value (PPV=31%, 95% CI 26% to 38%).Relaxing the referral criteria for acuity from worse than 6/9 to worse than 6/12 improved PPV without adversely affecting NPV.There is scope for reducing costs by altering the visual acuity criterion for referral.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Counties Manukau District Health Board, Auckland, New Zealand.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus