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Preschool children's vision screening in New Zealand: a retrospective evaluation of referral accuracy.

Langeslag-Smith MA, Vandal AC, Briane V, Thompson B, Anstice NS - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Screening produced high numbers of false positive referrals, resulting in poor positive predictive value (PPV=31%, 95% CI 26% to 38%).Relaxing the referral criteria for acuity from worse than 6/9 to worse than 6/12 improved PPV without adversely affecting NPV.There is scope for reducing costs by altering the visual acuity criterion for referral.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Counties Manukau District Health Board, Auckland, New Zealand.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Retrospective records review of B4 School Check vision screening results in the South Auckland region of New Zealand from 1 March 2010 to 28 February 2011.
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BMJOPEN2015009207F1: Retrospective records review of B4 School Check vision screening results in the South Auckland region of New Zealand from 1 March 2010 to 28 February 2011.

Mentions: A breakdown of the records that were available for retrospective review is shown in figure 1. Six hundred and two children declined vision screening and over half were of Māori (23.1%) or Pacifika ethnicity (37.4%), which is higher than the proportion of these children who received vision screening (15.7% and 25%, respectively). SES appeared to be a factor affecting whether vision screening was accepted or declined, as 54% of the families who declined screening lived in the most deprived areas, whereas only 12% of the families who declined lived in the most affluent areas.


Preschool children's vision screening in New Zealand: a retrospective evaluation of referral accuracy.

Langeslag-Smith MA, Vandal AC, Briane V, Thompson B, Anstice NS - BMJ Open (2015)

Retrospective records review of B4 School Check vision screening results in the South Auckland region of New Zealand from 1 March 2010 to 28 February 2011.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663450&req=5

BMJOPEN2015009207F1: Retrospective records review of B4 School Check vision screening results in the South Auckland region of New Zealand from 1 March 2010 to 28 February 2011.
Mentions: A breakdown of the records that were available for retrospective review is shown in figure 1. Six hundred and two children declined vision screening and over half were of Māori (23.1%) or Pacifika ethnicity (37.4%), which is higher than the proportion of these children who received vision screening (15.7% and 25%, respectively). SES appeared to be a factor affecting whether vision screening was accepted or declined, as 54% of the families who declined screening lived in the most deprived areas, whereas only 12% of the families who declined lived in the most affluent areas.

Bottom Line: Screening produced high numbers of false positive referrals, resulting in poor positive predictive value (PPV=31%, 95% CI 26% to 38%).Relaxing the referral criteria for acuity from worse than 6/9 to worse than 6/12 improved PPV without adversely affecting NPV.There is scope for reducing costs by altering the visual acuity criterion for referral.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Counties Manukau District Health Board, Auckland, New Zealand.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus