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Obesity in pregnancy: infant health service utilisation and costs on the NHS.

Morgan KL, Rahman MA, Hill RA, Khanom A, Lyons RA, Brophy ST - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Mean total costs were 72% higher among children born to obese mothers (rate ratio (RR) 1.72, 95% CI 1.71 to 1.73) compared with infants born to healthy weight mothers.Higher costings were attributed to a significantly greater number (RR 1.39, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.84) and duration (RR 1.55, 95% CI 1.37 to 1.74) of inpatient visits and a higher number of general practitioner visits (RR 1.10, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.16).Considering both maternal and infant health service use, interventions that cost less than £2310 per person in reducing obesity early pregnancy could be cost-effective.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for the Development and Evaluation of Complex Interventions for Public Health Improvement (DECIPHer), School of Social Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

A flow diagram depicting participant involvement within the study (BMI, body mass index).
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BMJOPEN2015008357F1: A flow diagram depicting participant involvement within the study (BMI, body mass index).

Mentions: Figure 1 highlights the process for obtaining the study population, and descriptive statistics for all three groups of mother–child pairs are shown in table 1. Over half of mothers had a healthy weight (BMI between 18.5 and 24.9 kg/m2) during early pregnancy and approximately 44% of mothers were overweight or obese (BMI>25 kg/m2). Mothers who were obese were more likely to be affluent (signified by Lower Super Output Area (LSOA) deprivation score), have at least one previous child and deliver a macrosomic infant. No significant differences were shown between the number of women smoking and reporting alcohol consumption during pregnancy between the three groups. Mothers excluded because of missing early-pregnancy BMI data were of similar age (29.3 vs 28.6, p=0.42) and deprivation (3.0 vs 3.1, p=0.38) to those included within the study. Their infants also displayed similar birth weights (3.38 vs 3.43, p=0.45) and gestational ages (39.48 vs 39.53, p=0.83) as those infants included.


Obesity in pregnancy: infant health service utilisation and costs on the NHS.

Morgan KL, Rahman MA, Hill RA, Khanom A, Lyons RA, Brophy ST - BMJ Open (2015)

A flow diagram depicting participant involvement within the study (BMI, body mass index).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663437&req=5

BMJOPEN2015008357F1: A flow diagram depicting participant involvement within the study (BMI, body mass index).
Mentions: Figure 1 highlights the process for obtaining the study population, and descriptive statistics for all three groups of mother–child pairs are shown in table 1. Over half of mothers had a healthy weight (BMI between 18.5 and 24.9 kg/m2) during early pregnancy and approximately 44% of mothers were overweight or obese (BMI>25 kg/m2). Mothers who were obese were more likely to be affluent (signified by Lower Super Output Area (LSOA) deprivation score), have at least one previous child and deliver a macrosomic infant. No significant differences were shown between the number of women smoking and reporting alcohol consumption during pregnancy between the three groups. Mothers excluded because of missing early-pregnancy BMI data were of similar age (29.3 vs 28.6, p=0.42) and deprivation (3.0 vs 3.1, p=0.38) to those included within the study. Their infants also displayed similar birth weights (3.38 vs 3.43, p=0.45) and gestational ages (39.48 vs 39.53, p=0.83) as those infants included.

Bottom Line: Mean total costs were 72% higher among children born to obese mothers (rate ratio (RR) 1.72, 95% CI 1.71 to 1.73) compared with infants born to healthy weight mothers.Higher costings were attributed to a significantly greater number (RR 1.39, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.84) and duration (RR 1.55, 95% CI 1.37 to 1.74) of inpatient visits and a higher number of general practitioner visits (RR 1.10, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.16).Considering both maternal and infant health service use, interventions that cost less than £2310 per person in reducing obesity early pregnancy could be cost-effective.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for the Development and Evaluation of Complex Interventions for Public Health Improvement (DECIPHer), School of Social Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus