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Delayed/back up antibiotic prescriptions: what do the public think?

McNulty CA, Lecky DM, Hawking MK, Quigley A, Butler CC - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Only 4% of all respondents, and 15% of those prescribed an antibiotic, reported being offered a delayed antibiotic in the last year.Wider understanding and acceptance of delayed prescribing may facilitate increased uptake.Further research is needed to determine why groups are so strongly in favour or opposed to delayed prescribing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Primary Care Unit, Public Health England, Microbiology Department, Gloucestershire Royal Hospital, Gloucester, UK.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentage of general public aware of the term ‘delayed antibiotic’ and/or the practice (n=1625).
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BMJOPEN2015009748F1: Percentage of general public aware of the term ‘delayed antibiotic’ and/or the practice (n=1625).

Mentions: Only 17% of respondents (CI±1.8%) reported they fully understood the meaning of the term delayed antibiotic prescription and how the strategy is used in general practice, a further 5% had heard of the term but did not know exactly what it meant, 6% had heard of the practice but did not know the name for it, while 72%(CI±2.2%) were not aware of either the name or the practice (figure 1). Full awareness was significantly higher in women (22%) compared to men (13%, p<0.001); those in professional social grades ABC1 (21% compared to 13% DE individuals, p=0.001), those with higher educational attainment (20% of those with A level or degree compared with 13% if no formal education p=0.015) and respondents with children (21% compared to 15% with no children). Awareness was highest in part-time workers (27%).


Delayed/back up antibiotic prescriptions: what do the public think?

McNulty CA, Lecky DM, Hawking MK, Quigley A, Butler CC - BMJ Open (2015)

Percentage of general public aware of the term ‘delayed antibiotic’ and/or the practice (n=1625).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663434&req=5

BMJOPEN2015009748F1: Percentage of general public aware of the term ‘delayed antibiotic’ and/or the practice (n=1625).
Mentions: Only 17% of respondents (CI±1.8%) reported they fully understood the meaning of the term delayed antibiotic prescription and how the strategy is used in general practice, a further 5% had heard of the term but did not know exactly what it meant, 6% had heard of the practice but did not know the name for it, while 72%(CI±2.2%) were not aware of either the name or the practice (figure 1). Full awareness was significantly higher in women (22%) compared to men (13%, p<0.001); those in professional social grades ABC1 (21% compared to 13% DE individuals, p=0.001), those with higher educational attainment (20% of those with A level or degree compared with 13% if no formal education p=0.015) and respondents with children (21% compared to 15% with no children). Awareness was highest in part-time workers (27%).

Bottom Line: Only 4% of all respondents, and 15% of those prescribed an antibiotic, reported being offered a delayed antibiotic in the last year.Wider understanding and acceptance of delayed prescribing may facilitate increased uptake.Further research is needed to determine why groups are so strongly in favour or opposed to delayed prescribing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Primary Care Unit, Public Health England, Microbiology Department, Gloucestershire Royal Hospital, Gloucester, UK.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus