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Postdischarge mortality in children with acute infectious diseases: derivation of postdischarge mortality prediction models.

Wiens MO, Kumbakumba E, Larson CP, Ansermino JM, Singer J, Kissoon N, Wong H, Ndamira A, Kabakyenga J, Kiwanuka J, Zhou G - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: None.Identification of at-risk children is critical in developing postdischarge interventions.Improved discharge planning and care could be provided for high-risk children.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

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Consort diagram of study flow.
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BMJOPEN2015009449F1: Consort diagram of study flow.

Mentions: During the period of study, 1822 participants were screened for eligibility, of which 516 (28%) were excluded. Reasons for exclusion included isolated malnutrition (n=192), readmission of previously enrolled participant (n=51), refusal of consent (n=22), cardiac disease (n=19), poisoning/drug reaction (n=19) and cancer (n=12) as well as a plethora of other non-infectious admissions (n=165). In total, 1307 participants admitted with a presumed or proven infection were enrolled at the time of their admission. During the course of admission, 64 (5.1%) participants died, and 1242 (94.9%) were discharged alive (figure 1). Among the children discharged, 54% were male, and the median age was 18.1 months (IQR 10.8–34.6). Pneumonia, malaria and gastroenteritis were the most common clinical discharge diagnoses and were present in 31%, 50%, and 8% of discharged participants, respectively. According to anthropometric variables collected at admission, 30% of participants were considered underweight (weight for age z-score <−2), 35% were considered wasted (weight for height/length z-score <−2), and 29% were considered stunted (height/length for age z-score <−2) (table 1). Missing observations were minimal (table 2).


Postdischarge mortality in children with acute infectious diseases: derivation of postdischarge mortality prediction models.

Wiens MO, Kumbakumba E, Larson CP, Ansermino JM, Singer J, Kissoon N, Wong H, Ndamira A, Kabakyenga J, Kiwanuka J, Zhou G - BMJ Open (2015)

Consort diagram of study flow.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663423&req=5

BMJOPEN2015009449F1: Consort diagram of study flow.
Mentions: During the period of study, 1822 participants were screened for eligibility, of which 516 (28%) were excluded. Reasons for exclusion included isolated malnutrition (n=192), readmission of previously enrolled participant (n=51), refusal of consent (n=22), cardiac disease (n=19), poisoning/drug reaction (n=19) and cancer (n=12) as well as a plethora of other non-infectious admissions (n=165). In total, 1307 participants admitted with a presumed or proven infection were enrolled at the time of their admission. During the course of admission, 64 (5.1%) participants died, and 1242 (94.9%) were discharged alive (figure 1). Among the children discharged, 54% were male, and the median age was 18.1 months (IQR 10.8–34.6). Pneumonia, malaria and gastroenteritis were the most common clinical discharge diagnoses and were present in 31%, 50%, and 8% of discharged participants, respectively. According to anthropometric variables collected at admission, 30% of participants were considered underweight (weight for age z-score <−2), 35% were considered wasted (weight for height/length z-score <−2), and 29% were considered stunted (height/length for age z-score <−2) (table 1). Missing observations were minimal (table 2).

Bottom Line: None.Identification of at-risk children is critical in developing postdischarge interventions.Improved discharge planning and care could be provided for high-risk children.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus