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Beyond height and weight: a programme of school nurse assessed skinfold measurements from white British and South Asian origin children aged 4-5 years within the Born in Bradford cohort study.

West J, Santorelli G, Lennon L, O'Connell K, Corkett J, Wright J, Brierley S, Whincup P, Cameron N, Lawlor DA - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Reliability was generally over 90% for all measurers and both measurements.Pakistani children were slightly taller but weighed less and had lower triceps skinfold thickness (mean difference -1.8 mm, 95% CI -2.1 to -1.4 mm) but higher subscapular (mean difference 0.1 mm, 95% CI -0.1 to 0.4 mm) than white British children.It is important for healthcare practice to acknowledge ethnic-specific risk and these additional measurements can provide important information to examine population-level risk in populations with large proportions of South Asian children.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bradford Institute for Health Research, Bradford Royal Infirmary, Bradford, UK School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean z-score differences (95% CI) for Pakistani infants relative to white British infants (BMI, body mass index; SF, skinfold).
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BMJOPEN2015008630F1: Mean z-score differences (95% CI) for Pakistani infants relative to white British infants (BMI, body mass index; SF, skinfold).

Mentions: Figure 1 shows mean z-score differences in height, weight, BMI, triceps and subscapular skinfold for Pakistani children relative to white British children (the 2 largest groups in this sample). Compared with white British children, the Pakistani children were taller, but weighed less with the magnitudes of these differences being similar to each other. This resulted in notably lower BMI in Pakistani, compared with white British children of −0.27 SDs (95% CI −0.37 to −0.17). Triceps skinfold was also markedly lower in Pakistani compared with white British children, but subscapular skinfolds, while not statistically significant, appeared similar in both groups (mean difference 0.1 mm, 95% CI 0.1 to 0.4 mm). When we further adjusted for BMI (data not presented), triceps skinfolds were 0.20 SD lower in Pakistani compared with white British children (95% CI 0.25 to −0.16) and subscapular skinfolds were 0.10 SD higher (95% CI 0.06 to 0.14).


Beyond height and weight: a programme of school nurse assessed skinfold measurements from white British and South Asian origin children aged 4-5 years within the Born in Bradford cohort study.

West J, Santorelli G, Lennon L, O'Connell K, Corkett J, Wright J, Brierley S, Whincup P, Cameron N, Lawlor DA - BMJ Open (2015)

Mean z-score differences (95% CI) for Pakistani infants relative to white British infants (BMI, body mass index; SF, skinfold).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663422&req=5

BMJOPEN2015008630F1: Mean z-score differences (95% CI) for Pakistani infants relative to white British infants (BMI, body mass index; SF, skinfold).
Mentions: Figure 1 shows mean z-score differences in height, weight, BMI, triceps and subscapular skinfold for Pakistani children relative to white British children (the 2 largest groups in this sample). Compared with white British children, the Pakistani children were taller, but weighed less with the magnitudes of these differences being similar to each other. This resulted in notably lower BMI in Pakistani, compared with white British children of −0.27 SDs (95% CI −0.37 to −0.17). Triceps skinfold was also markedly lower in Pakistani compared with white British children, but subscapular skinfolds, while not statistically significant, appeared similar in both groups (mean difference 0.1 mm, 95% CI 0.1 to 0.4 mm). When we further adjusted for BMI (data not presented), triceps skinfolds were 0.20 SD lower in Pakistani compared with white British children (95% CI 0.25 to −0.16) and subscapular skinfolds were 0.10 SD higher (95% CI 0.06 to 0.14).

Bottom Line: Reliability was generally over 90% for all measurers and both measurements.Pakistani children were slightly taller but weighed less and had lower triceps skinfold thickness (mean difference -1.8 mm, 95% CI -2.1 to -1.4 mm) but higher subscapular (mean difference 0.1 mm, 95% CI -0.1 to 0.4 mm) than white British children.It is important for healthcare practice to acknowledge ethnic-specific risk and these additional measurements can provide important information to examine population-level risk in populations with large proportions of South Asian children.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bradford Institute for Health Research, Bradford Royal Infirmary, Bradford, UK School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus