Limits...
Determinants of access to chronic illness care: a mixed-methods evaluation of a national multifaceted chronic disease package for Indigenous Australians.

Bailie J, Schierhout G, Laycock A, Kelaher M, Percival N, O'Donoghue L, McNeair T, Bailie R - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Application of the access framework highlighted the complex inter-relationships between dimensions of access.Key ongoing challenges are achieving population coverage through a national programme, reaching high-need groups and ensuring provision of ongoing care.These findings highlight the importance of flexibility in national programme guidelines to support locally determined strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Number of Indigenous people accessing the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) Co-payment measure per 100 Indigenous people aged ≥15 years for sentinel sites and the rest of Australia, by rurality, quarter, September 2010 to May 2012.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663407&req=5

BMJOPEN2015008103F4: Number of Indigenous people accessing the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) Co-payment measure per 100 Indigenous people aged ≥15 years for sentinel sites and the rest of Australia, by rurality, quarter, September 2010 to May 2012.

Mentions: The PBS Co-payment initiative provided subsidised or free prescription medicines. It worked as a patient incentive to access other health services offered as part of the ICDP, and, as reported in the interviews and community focus groups, resulted in improved medication adherence. Uptake was higher than expected (27 per 100 eligible Indigenous patients across the evaluation sites in March to May 2012) and was promoted by the ICDP workforce (figure 4).


Determinants of access to chronic illness care: a mixed-methods evaluation of a national multifaceted chronic disease package for Indigenous Australians.

Bailie J, Schierhout G, Laycock A, Kelaher M, Percival N, O'Donoghue L, McNeair T, Bailie R - BMJ Open (2015)

Number of Indigenous people accessing the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) Co-payment measure per 100 Indigenous people aged ≥15 years for sentinel sites and the rest of Australia, by rurality, quarter, September 2010 to May 2012.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663407&req=5

BMJOPEN2015008103F4: Number of Indigenous people accessing the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) Co-payment measure per 100 Indigenous people aged ≥15 years for sentinel sites and the rest of Australia, by rurality, quarter, September 2010 to May 2012.
Mentions: The PBS Co-payment initiative provided subsidised or free prescription medicines. It worked as a patient incentive to access other health services offered as part of the ICDP, and, as reported in the interviews and community focus groups, resulted in improved medication adherence. Uptake was higher than expected (27 per 100 eligible Indigenous patients across the evaluation sites in March to May 2012) and was promoted by the ICDP workforce (figure 4).

Bottom Line: Application of the access framework highlighted the complex inter-relationships between dimensions of access.Key ongoing challenges are achieving population coverage through a national programme, reaching high-need groups and ensuring provision of ongoing care.These findings highlight the importance of flexibility in national programme guidelines to support locally determined strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus