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Determinants of access to chronic illness care: a mixed-methods evaluation of a national multifaceted chronic disease package for Indigenous Australians.

Bailie J, Schierhout G, Laycock A, Kelaher M, Percival N, O'Donoghue L, McNeair T, Bailie R - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Application of the access framework highlighted the complex inter-relationships between dimensions of access.Key ongoing challenges are achieving population coverage through a national programme, reaching high-need groups and ensuring provision of ongoing care.These findings highlight the importance of flexibility in national programme guidelines to support locally determined strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentage of tiers 1 and 2 payments for people registered for the PIP Indigenous Health Incentive for sentinel sites and the rest of Australia, by sector and year 2010–2011. GP, general practice; AHS, Aboriginal Health Service; PIP-IHI, Practice Incentives Program Indigenous Health Incentive.
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BMJOPEN2015008103F2: Percentage of tiers 1 and 2 payments for people registered for the PIP Indigenous Health Incentive for sentinel sites and the rest of Australia, by sector and year 2010–2011. GP, general practice; AHS, Aboriginal Health Service; PIP-IHI, Practice Incentives Program Indigenous Health Incentive.

Mentions: Patients registered for the PIP-IHI were expected to have a diagnosed chronic disease; therefore, it is notable that additional payments reflecting continuity of care and planned review (tier 1 or 2 payments) were not triggered for around 30% of patients (figure 2). This indicates a substantial proportion of patients registered for the PIP-IHI were not attending health services regularly, or health services were not billing for care in a way that triggered payments. There was a higher percentage of PIP-IHI registered patients for whom no payments were made in Indigenous Health Services than in the general practice sector.


Determinants of access to chronic illness care: a mixed-methods evaluation of a national multifaceted chronic disease package for Indigenous Australians.

Bailie J, Schierhout G, Laycock A, Kelaher M, Percival N, O'Donoghue L, McNeair T, Bailie R - BMJ Open (2015)

Percentage of tiers 1 and 2 payments for people registered for the PIP Indigenous Health Incentive for sentinel sites and the rest of Australia, by sector and year 2010–2011. GP, general practice; AHS, Aboriginal Health Service; PIP-IHI, Practice Incentives Program Indigenous Health Incentive.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663407&req=5

BMJOPEN2015008103F2: Percentage of tiers 1 and 2 payments for people registered for the PIP Indigenous Health Incentive for sentinel sites and the rest of Australia, by sector and year 2010–2011. GP, general practice; AHS, Aboriginal Health Service; PIP-IHI, Practice Incentives Program Indigenous Health Incentive.
Mentions: Patients registered for the PIP-IHI were expected to have a diagnosed chronic disease; therefore, it is notable that additional payments reflecting continuity of care and planned review (tier 1 or 2 payments) were not triggered for around 30% of patients (figure 2). This indicates a substantial proportion of patients registered for the PIP-IHI were not attending health services regularly, or health services were not billing for care in a way that triggered payments. There was a higher percentage of PIP-IHI registered patients for whom no payments were made in Indigenous Health Services than in the general practice sector.

Bottom Line: Application of the access framework highlighted the complex inter-relationships between dimensions of access.Key ongoing challenges are achieving population coverage through a national programme, reaching high-need groups and ensuring provision of ongoing care.These findings highlight the importance of flexibility in national programme guidelines to support locally determined strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus