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An ecological analysis of PM2.5 concentrations and lung cancer mortality rates in China.

Fu J, Jiang D, Lin G, Liu K, Wang Q - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Geographically weighted regression was performed to evaluate the relation between PM2.5 concentrations and lung cancer mortality for males, females and for both sexes combined, in 2008, based on newly available long-term data.Lung cancer fatalities from long-term exposure to PM2.5 were calculated according to studies by Pope III et al and the WHO air quality guidelines (AQGs). 31 provinces in China.PM2.5 was associated with the lung cancer mortality of males, females and both sexes combined, in China, although there were exceptions in several regions, for males and females.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Resources and Environmental Information System, Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.

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Distribution of mortality from lung cancer of (A) both sexes, and (B) males and (C) females, in China, by province, during 2008.
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BMJOPEN2015009452F3: Distribution of mortality from lung cancer of (A) both sexes, and (B) males and (C) females, in China, by province, during 2008.

Mentions: The data on mortality from lung cancer used in this study were taken from a population-based cross-sectional study.23 Population-based cancer registries are not well established and the epidemiological data for cancer in China have, so far, been limited. Based on population coverage and the accuracy of the available mortality estimates for the provinces, Li et al determined the lung cancer mortality rate for 31 provincial regions in China during 2008, using three estimation models. The model was fit and compared with prior data from the literature and was shown to successfully reflect the number of deaths caused by lung cancer in China.23 Owing to its reliability for mortality from lung cancer by province, these data can be considered as a valuable scientific reference for epidemiology until a new and more accurate lung cancer mortality report is published in China. Figure 3A–C shows the distribution of mortality from lung cancer in China by province during 2008, for both sexes combined, and for males and females separately.


An ecological analysis of PM2.5 concentrations and lung cancer mortality rates in China.

Fu J, Jiang D, Lin G, Liu K, Wang Q - BMJ Open (2015)

Distribution of mortality from lung cancer of (A) both sexes, and (B) males and (C) females, in China, by province, during 2008.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663405&req=5

BMJOPEN2015009452F3: Distribution of mortality from lung cancer of (A) both sexes, and (B) males and (C) females, in China, by province, during 2008.
Mentions: The data on mortality from lung cancer used in this study were taken from a population-based cross-sectional study.23 Population-based cancer registries are not well established and the epidemiological data for cancer in China have, so far, been limited. Based on population coverage and the accuracy of the available mortality estimates for the provinces, Li et al determined the lung cancer mortality rate for 31 provincial regions in China during 2008, using three estimation models. The model was fit and compared with prior data from the literature and was shown to successfully reflect the number of deaths caused by lung cancer in China.23 Owing to its reliability for mortality from lung cancer by province, these data can be considered as a valuable scientific reference for epidemiology until a new and more accurate lung cancer mortality report is published in China. Figure 3A–C shows the distribution of mortality from lung cancer in China by province during 2008, for both sexes combined, and for males and females separately.

Bottom Line: Geographically weighted regression was performed to evaluate the relation between PM2.5 concentrations and lung cancer mortality for males, females and for both sexes combined, in 2008, based on newly available long-term data.Lung cancer fatalities from long-term exposure to PM2.5 were calculated according to studies by Pope III et al and the WHO air quality guidelines (AQGs). 31 provinces in China.PM2.5 was associated with the lung cancer mortality of males, females and both sexes combined, in China, although there were exceptions in several regions, for males and females.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Resources and Environmental Information System, Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus