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An ecological analysis of PM2.5 concentrations and lung cancer mortality rates in China.

Fu J, Jiang D, Lin G, Liu K, Wang Q - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Geographically weighted regression was performed to evaluate the relation between PM2.5 concentrations and lung cancer mortality for males, females and for both sexes combined, in 2008, based on newly available long-term data.Lung cancer fatalities from long-term exposure to PM2.5 were calculated according to studies by Pope III et al and the WHO air quality guidelines (AQGs). 31 provinces in China.PM2.5 was associated with the lung cancer mortality of males, females and both sexes combined, in China, although there were exceptions in several regions, for males and females.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Resources and Environmental Information System, Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.

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The estimated distribution of PM2.5 concentrations in 2008. PM, Particulate Matter.
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BMJOPEN2015009452F1: The estimated distribution of PM2.5 concentrations in 2008. PM, Particulate Matter.

Mentions: The global annual average PM2.5 gridded data sets for the period 2001–201019 were obtained from the website of the Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center (SEDAC); the spatial resolution of the data sets was 0.5°×0.5°. The data sets were generated by two researchers at Columbia University, based on the work of van Donkelaar et al.20 The conversion factor, which accounts for the spatio–temporal relationship between PM2.5 and aerosol optical depth (AOD), developed by van Donkelaar, was treated as a constant from 2001 to 2010 after minor processing; then, the monthly mean conversion factors were multiplied by the satellite AOD to calculate the PM2.5 concentration of each grid cell. Finally, the annual average surface PM2.5 concentrations were obtained by averaging the monthly estimates over each year.19 The PM2.5 gridded data from 2008 in China, used in this paper, were processed using ArcGIS 10.1, for better match with other data sets. Figure 1 shows the estimated distribution of PM2.5 concentrations in 2008.


An ecological analysis of PM2.5 concentrations and lung cancer mortality rates in China.

Fu J, Jiang D, Lin G, Liu K, Wang Q - BMJ Open (2015)

The estimated distribution of PM2.5 concentrations in 2008. PM, Particulate Matter.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663405&req=5

BMJOPEN2015009452F1: The estimated distribution of PM2.5 concentrations in 2008. PM, Particulate Matter.
Mentions: The global annual average PM2.5 gridded data sets for the period 2001–201019 were obtained from the website of the Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center (SEDAC); the spatial resolution of the data sets was 0.5°×0.5°. The data sets were generated by two researchers at Columbia University, based on the work of van Donkelaar et al.20 The conversion factor, which accounts for the spatio–temporal relationship between PM2.5 and aerosol optical depth (AOD), developed by van Donkelaar, was treated as a constant from 2001 to 2010 after minor processing; then, the monthly mean conversion factors were multiplied by the satellite AOD to calculate the PM2.5 concentration of each grid cell. Finally, the annual average surface PM2.5 concentrations were obtained by averaging the monthly estimates over each year.19 The PM2.5 gridded data from 2008 in China, used in this paper, were processed using ArcGIS 10.1, for better match with other data sets. Figure 1 shows the estimated distribution of PM2.5 concentrations in 2008.

Bottom Line: Geographically weighted regression was performed to evaluate the relation between PM2.5 concentrations and lung cancer mortality for males, females and for both sexes combined, in 2008, based on newly available long-term data.Lung cancer fatalities from long-term exposure to PM2.5 were calculated according to studies by Pope III et al and the WHO air quality guidelines (AQGs). 31 provinces in China.PM2.5 was associated with the lung cancer mortality of males, females and both sexes combined, in China, although there were exceptions in several regions, for males and females.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Resources and Environmental Information System, Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus