Limits...
Perceived ethical acceptability of financial incentives to improve diabetic eye screening attendance.

Wadge H, Bicknell C, Vlaev I - BMJ Open Diabetes Res Care (2015)

Bottom Line: In order to understand how views might vary within a population, demographic variables were used to analyze the results.Vouchers were found to be the most acceptable form of incentive, significantly more so than cash payments.Age was an important factor, with those aged between 40 and 64 the most optimistic about the potential benefits.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Surgery, Department of Surgery and Cancer , St Mary's Hospital , London , UK.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To test the ethical acceptability of using financial incentives to increase diabetic retinopathy screening attendance.

Background: Financial incentives could be an effective way to increase attendance at screening for diabetic retinopathy, although there can be ethical concerns about this approach.

Design: Survey of people with diabetes in North West London. Those who were due to attend a screening appointment were invited to complete a questionnaire. Key demographic variables included age, gender, and deprivation.

Setting and participants: A questionnaire was issued to those invited to attend screening in North West London and those who run the screening service. The questionnaire captured views on aspects of the ethical problem and different incentive types.

Main variables studied: It captured views on the different dimensions of the ethical problem and different types of incentive. In order to understand how views might vary within a population, demographic variables were used to analyze the results.

Results and conclusions: Vouchers were found to be the most acceptable form of incentive, significantly more so than cash payments. Most rejected the notion of targeting those who need incentivizing, preferring equality. Age was an important factor, with those aged between 40 and 64 the most optimistic about the potential benefits. Higher levels of deprivation were linked to increased acceptability scores. While some ethical concerns are strongly held among certain groups, there is also much support for the principle of incentivizing positive behaviors. This paves the way for future research into the effectiveness of incentivizing diabetic retinopathy screening attendance.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Factor analysis showing correlation between responses to question 4 (Cronbach's α coefficient measure of internal consistency). (NHS, National Health Service).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663372&req=5

BMJDRC2015000118F1: Factor analysis showing correlation between responses to question 4 (Cronbach's α coefficient measure of internal consistency). (NHS, National Health Service).

Mentions: To ensure question 4 was capturing ethical acceptability, we ran a factor analysis which showed a high degree of correlation between responses (figure 1). The exception being the final statement pair. This outlier question may draw on different constructs, about the risks of screening itself, rather than how this relates to ethical acceptability. Cronbach's α coefficient measure of internal consistency found responses to question 4 to be highly reliable (α=0.91) when 4.7 was excluded.


Perceived ethical acceptability of financial incentives to improve diabetic eye screening attendance.

Wadge H, Bicknell C, Vlaev I - BMJ Open Diabetes Res Care (2015)

Factor analysis showing correlation between responses to question 4 (Cronbach's α coefficient measure of internal consistency). (NHS, National Health Service).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663372&req=5

BMJDRC2015000118F1: Factor analysis showing correlation between responses to question 4 (Cronbach's α coefficient measure of internal consistency). (NHS, National Health Service).
Mentions: To ensure question 4 was capturing ethical acceptability, we ran a factor analysis which showed a high degree of correlation between responses (figure 1). The exception being the final statement pair. This outlier question may draw on different constructs, about the risks of screening itself, rather than how this relates to ethical acceptability. Cronbach's α coefficient measure of internal consistency found responses to question 4 to be highly reliable (α=0.91) when 4.7 was excluded.

Bottom Line: In order to understand how views might vary within a population, demographic variables were used to analyze the results.Vouchers were found to be the most acceptable form of incentive, significantly more so than cash payments.Age was an important factor, with those aged between 40 and 64 the most optimistic about the potential benefits.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Surgery, Department of Surgery and Cancer , St Mary's Hospital , London , UK.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To test the ethical acceptability of using financial incentives to increase diabetic retinopathy screening attendance.

Background: Financial incentives could be an effective way to increase attendance at screening for diabetic retinopathy, although there can be ethical concerns about this approach.

Design: Survey of people with diabetes in North West London. Those who were due to attend a screening appointment were invited to complete a questionnaire. Key demographic variables included age, gender, and deprivation.

Setting and participants: A questionnaire was issued to those invited to attend screening in North West London and those who run the screening service. The questionnaire captured views on aspects of the ethical problem and different incentive types.

Main variables studied: It captured views on the different dimensions of the ethical problem and different types of incentive. In order to understand how views might vary within a population, demographic variables were used to analyze the results.

Results and conclusions: Vouchers were found to be the most acceptable form of incentive, significantly more so than cash payments. Most rejected the notion of targeting those who need incentivizing, preferring equality. Age was an important factor, with those aged between 40 and 64 the most optimistic about the potential benefits. Higher levels of deprivation were linked to increased acceptability scores. While some ethical concerns are strongly held among certain groups, there is also much support for the principle of incentivizing positive behaviors. This paves the way for future research into the effectiveness of incentivizing diabetic retinopathy screening attendance.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus