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Biomechanical Evaluation of a Mandibular Spanning Plate Technique Compared to Standard Plating Techniques to Treat Mandibular Symphyseal Fractures.

Richardson M, Hayes J, Jordan JR, Puckett A, Fort M - Surg Res Pract (2015)

Bottom Line: The two parallel plates' group showed statistically significant lower values for peak load and stiffness compared to all other groups.No statistically significant difference was found for peak load and stiffness between the control (C) group, lag screw (LS) group, and the spanning plate (SP1) group.Conclusions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Mississippi Medical Center, Department of Otolaryngology and Communicative Sciences, 2500 N. State Street, Jackson, MS 39216, USA.

ABSTRACT
Purpose. The purpose of this study is to compare the biomechanical behavior of the spanning reconstruction plate compared to standard plating techniques for mandibular symphyseal fractures. Materials and Methods. Twenty-five human mandible replicas were used. Five unaltered synthetic mandibles were used as controls. Four experimental groups of different reconstruction techniques with five in each group were tested. Each synthetic mandible was subjected to a splaying force applied to the mandibular angle by a mechanical testing unit until the construct failed. Peak load and stiffness were recorded. The peak load and stiffness were analyzed using ANOVA and the Tukey test at a confidence level of 95% (P < 0.05). Results. The two parallel plates' group showed statistically significant lower values for peak load and stiffness compared to all other groups. No statistically significant difference was found for peak load and stiffness between the control (C) group, lag screw (LS) group, and the spanning plate (SP1) group. Conclusions. The spanning reconstruction plate technique for fixation of mandibular symphyseal fractures showed similar mechanical behavior to the lag screw technique when subjected to splaying forces between the mandibular gonial angles and may be considered as an alternative technique when increased reconstructive strength is needed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Sample positioned for mechanical testing in the Sintech 2/G servohydraulic materials testing unit.
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fig6: Sample positioned for mechanical testing in the Sintech 2/G servohydraulic materials testing unit.

Mentions: Biomechanical testing was performed on each synthetic mandible properly prepared with the respective fixation method. Each mandible was tested only once. Five uncut mandibles served as controls to define the limitations of the substrate (synthetic mandible replica). Each sample was placed in a custom fabricated jig consisting of two heavy-duty nylon straps. Each nylon strap was folded onto itself to create a loop. One nylon strap loop was placed over the condylar and coronoid heads and seated at the angle of the mandible on each side. The nylon strap loops were attached to the vertical arms of the mechanical testing unit. Each construct was preloaded with 0.5 lbs to provide enough tension between nylon strap loops such that the mandible would be suspended between them. Vertical loads were created and measured with a Sintech 2/G (MTS Corporation, Minneapolis, MN) servohydraulic materials testing unit (Figure 6). The vector force was therefore lateral to each mandibular angle simulating the physiologic splaying forces on the mandible from the suprahyoid, masseter, and temporalis muscles. The servohydraulic testing unit developed a linear displacement at a rate of 10 mm per minute, and 250 lbs load cell measured the resultant force. Loading was continued up to mechanical failure of each construct. Data were captured and analyzed with the TestWorks 4 (MTS Corporation, Minneapolis, MN) software. Means were calculated for peak load and stiffness of each test group (Table 2). The peak load and stiffness were analyzed using ANOVA and the Tukey test at a confidence level of 95% (P < 0.05). Results between groups were compared for statistical significance using the Mann-Whitney test allowing for nonparametric data analysis (Table 3). A two-tailed P less than 0.01 was considered significant.


Biomechanical Evaluation of a Mandibular Spanning Plate Technique Compared to Standard Plating Techniques to Treat Mandibular Symphyseal Fractures.

Richardson M, Hayes J, Jordan JR, Puckett A, Fort M - Surg Res Pract (2015)

Sample positioned for mechanical testing in the Sintech 2/G servohydraulic materials testing unit.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663366&req=5

fig6: Sample positioned for mechanical testing in the Sintech 2/G servohydraulic materials testing unit.
Mentions: Biomechanical testing was performed on each synthetic mandible properly prepared with the respective fixation method. Each mandible was tested only once. Five uncut mandibles served as controls to define the limitations of the substrate (synthetic mandible replica). Each sample was placed in a custom fabricated jig consisting of two heavy-duty nylon straps. Each nylon strap was folded onto itself to create a loop. One nylon strap loop was placed over the condylar and coronoid heads and seated at the angle of the mandible on each side. The nylon strap loops were attached to the vertical arms of the mechanical testing unit. Each construct was preloaded with 0.5 lbs to provide enough tension between nylon strap loops such that the mandible would be suspended between them. Vertical loads were created and measured with a Sintech 2/G (MTS Corporation, Minneapolis, MN) servohydraulic materials testing unit (Figure 6). The vector force was therefore lateral to each mandibular angle simulating the physiologic splaying forces on the mandible from the suprahyoid, masseter, and temporalis muscles. The servohydraulic testing unit developed a linear displacement at a rate of 10 mm per minute, and 250 lbs load cell measured the resultant force. Loading was continued up to mechanical failure of each construct. Data were captured and analyzed with the TestWorks 4 (MTS Corporation, Minneapolis, MN) software. Means were calculated for peak load and stiffness of each test group (Table 2). The peak load and stiffness were analyzed using ANOVA and the Tukey test at a confidence level of 95% (P < 0.05). Results between groups were compared for statistical significance using the Mann-Whitney test allowing for nonparametric data analysis (Table 3). A two-tailed P less than 0.01 was considered significant.

Bottom Line: The two parallel plates' group showed statistically significant lower values for peak load and stiffness compared to all other groups.No statistically significant difference was found for peak load and stiffness between the control (C) group, lag screw (LS) group, and the spanning plate (SP1) group.Conclusions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Mississippi Medical Center, Department of Otolaryngology and Communicative Sciences, 2500 N. State Street, Jackson, MS 39216, USA.

ABSTRACT
Purpose. The purpose of this study is to compare the biomechanical behavior of the spanning reconstruction plate compared to standard plating techniques for mandibular symphyseal fractures. Materials and Methods. Twenty-five human mandible replicas were used. Five unaltered synthetic mandibles were used as controls. Four experimental groups of different reconstruction techniques with five in each group were tested. Each synthetic mandible was subjected to a splaying force applied to the mandibular angle by a mechanical testing unit until the construct failed. Peak load and stiffness were recorded. The peak load and stiffness were analyzed using ANOVA and the Tukey test at a confidence level of 95% (P < 0.05). Results. The two parallel plates' group showed statistically significant lower values for peak load and stiffness compared to all other groups. No statistically significant difference was found for peak load and stiffness between the control (C) group, lag screw (LS) group, and the spanning plate (SP1) group. Conclusions. The spanning reconstruction plate technique for fixation of mandibular symphyseal fractures showed similar mechanical behavior to the lag screw technique when subjected to splaying forces between the mandibular gonial angles and may be considered as an alternative technique when increased reconstructive strength is needed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus