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Detection of Babesia caballi and Theileria equi in Blood from Equines from Four Indigenous Communities in Costa Rica.

Posada-Guzmán MF, Dolz G, Romero-Zúñiga JJ, Jiménez-Rocha AE - Vet Med Int (2015)

Bottom Line: A cross-sectional study was carried out in four indigenous communities of Costa Rica to detect presence and prevalence of Babesia caballi and Theileria equi and to investigate factors associated with presence of these hemoparasites.There were no factors associated with the presence of B. caballi and T. equi.These results contrast with results previously obtained in equines in the Central Valley of Costa Rica.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Maestría en Enfermedades Tropicales, Posgrado Regional en Ciencias Veterinarias Tropicales, Universidad Nacional, Campus Presbítero Benjamín Nuñez, P.O. Box 86, 3000 Heredia, Costa Rica.

ABSTRACT
A cross-sectional study was carried out in four indigenous communities of Costa Rica to detect presence and prevalence of Babesia caballi and Theileria equi and to investigate factors associated with presence of these hemoparasites. General condition of horses (n = 285) was evaluated, and hematocrits and hemoglobin were determined from blood samples of 130 horses, which were also analyzed using blood smears, nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and immunosorbent assay (c-ELISA). The general condition of the horses (n = 285) in terms of their body and coat was between regular and poor, and hematocrit and hemoglobin average values were low (19% and 10.65 g/dL, resp.). Erythrocyte inclusions were observed in 32 (24.6%) of the samples. Twenty-six samples (20.0%) gave positive results for B. caballi and 60 (46.2%) for T. equi; 10 horses (7.7%) showed mixed infection, when analyzed by PCR. Using c-ELISA, it was found that 90 (69.2%) horses had antibodies against B. caballi and 115 (88.5%) against T. equi, while 81 (62.3%) showed mixed reactions. There were no factors associated with the presence of B. caballi and T. equi. These results contrast with results previously obtained in equines in the Central Valley of Costa Rica.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Location of indigenous communities in Costa Rica, showing the four sites sampled (taken from http://costarica1.bligoo.com.mx/?page=2 and modified).
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Location of indigenous communities in Costa Rica, showing the four sites sampled (taken from http://costarica1.bligoo.com.mx/?page=2 and modified).

Mentions: A descriptive cross-sectional observational study was carried out between March and October 2011 in the communities of Vereh, Paso Marcos, Alto Pacuare, and Amubre (Figure 1). The first three communities are in the Cabecar reserve, in Chirripó, Turrialba (9°41′45.81 to 9°48′46.12 North and 83°25′51.90 to 83°29′21.50 West), while the Amubre community is in Talamanca and belongs to the Bribri group (9°30′ North and 83°40′ West). Each community was visited once.


Detection of Babesia caballi and Theileria equi in Blood from Equines from Four Indigenous Communities in Costa Rica.

Posada-Guzmán MF, Dolz G, Romero-Zúñiga JJ, Jiménez-Rocha AE - Vet Med Int (2015)

Location of indigenous communities in Costa Rica, showing the four sites sampled (taken from http://costarica1.bligoo.com.mx/?page=2 and modified).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663365&req=5

fig1: Location of indigenous communities in Costa Rica, showing the four sites sampled (taken from http://costarica1.bligoo.com.mx/?page=2 and modified).
Mentions: A descriptive cross-sectional observational study was carried out between March and October 2011 in the communities of Vereh, Paso Marcos, Alto Pacuare, and Amubre (Figure 1). The first three communities are in the Cabecar reserve, in Chirripó, Turrialba (9°41′45.81 to 9°48′46.12 North and 83°25′51.90 to 83°29′21.50 West), while the Amubre community is in Talamanca and belongs to the Bribri group (9°30′ North and 83°40′ West). Each community was visited once.

Bottom Line: A cross-sectional study was carried out in four indigenous communities of Costa Rica to detect presence and prevalence of Babesia caballi and Theileria equi and to investigate factors associated with presence of these hemoparasites.There were no factors associated with the presence of B. caballi and T. equi.These results contrast with results previously obtained in equines in the Central Valley of Costa Rica.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Maestría en Enfermedades Tropicales, Posgrado Regional en Ciencias Veterinarias Tropicales, Universidad Nacional, Campus Presbítero Benjamín Nuñez, P.O. Box 86, 3000 Heredia, Costa Rica.

ABSTRACT
A cross-sectional study was carried out in four indigenous communities of Costa Rica to detect presence and prevalence of Babesia caballi and Theileria equi and to investigate factors associated with presence of these hemoparasites. General condition of horses (n = 285) was evaluated, and hematocrits and hemoglobin were determined from blood samples of 130 horses, which were also analyzed using blood smears, nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and immunosorbent assay (c-ELISA). The general condition of the horses (n = 285) in terms of their body and coat was between regular and poor, and hematocrit and hemoglobin average values were low (19% and 10.65 g/dL, resp.). Erythrocyte inclusions were observed in 32 (24.6%) of the samples. Twenty-six samples (20.0%) gave positive results for B. caballi and 60 (46.2%) for T. equi; 10 horses (7.7%) showed mixed infection, when analyzed by PCR. Using c-ELISA, it was found that 90 (69.2%) horses had antibodies against B. caballi and 115 (88.5%) against T. equi, while 81 (62.3%) showed mixed reactions. There were no factors associated with the presence of B. caballi and T. equi. These results contrast with results previously obtained in equines in the Central Valley of Costa Rica.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus