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Efficacy of Disinfection of Dental Stone Casts: Virkon versus Sodium Hypochlorite.

Moslehifard E, Lotfipour F, Robati Anaraki M, Shafee E, Tamjid-Shabestari S, Ghaffari T - J Dent (Tehran) (2015)

Bottom Line: We observed different bactericidal effects of Virkon at various concentrations; 1% Virkon killed S. aureus, P aeruginosa, and Candida albicans, while 3% Virkon solution was required to kill B. subtilis.For B. subtilis, the efficacy of 3% Virkon and 0.525% sodium hypochlorite was not significantly different (P >0.999).According to the obtained results for Virkon and based on its low toxicity and good environmental compatibility, it may be recommended as an antimicrobial disinfectant for dental stone casts as non-critical items.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Assistant Professor, Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The purpose of this experimental study was to compare the disinfection efficacy of sodium hypochlorite and peroxygenic acid (Virkon) solutions for dental stone casts contaminated with microbial strains.

Materials and methods: A total of 960 spherical stone beads with a diameter of 10 mm were prepared and used as carriers of bacterial inoculums. They were individually inoculated by soaking in broth culture media containing each of the four understudy microorganisms. Different concentrations of Virkon and hypochlorite solutions were prepared using distilled water and then were sprayed on the surfaces of dental casts contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis and Candida albicans. The pour plate technique was used to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of each solution. Microbicidal effect (ME) was calculated according to the log10 of control colony counts minus the log10 of the remaining colony counts after the antimicrobial procedure. Statistical difference was assessed using the Kruskal Wallis and the Man Whitney U tests with a significance of 95%.

Results: We observed different bactericidal effects of Virkon at various concentrations; 1% Virkon killed S. aureus, P aeruginosa, and Candida albicans, while 3% Virkon solution was required to kill B. subtilis. For S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, and C. albicans, no significant difference was observed between 1% Virkon and 0.525% sodium hypochlorite (P >0.05). For B. subtilis, the efficacy of 3% Virkon and 0.525% sodium hypochlorite was not significantly different (P >0.999).

Conclusion: According to the obtained results for Virkon and based on its low toxicity and good environmental compatibility, it may be recommended as an antimicrobial disinfectant for dental stone casts as non-critical items.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Dental arches with (a) metal and (b) acrylic spherical extensions 10 mm in diameter.
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Figure 1: Dental arches with (a) metal and (b) acrylic spherical extensions 10 mm in diameter.

Mentions: Acrylic dental arches were prepared with 10 unique spherical metal extensions 10 mm in diameter in the place of teeth (Figure 1). Then, stone casts were prepared by duplicating the acrylic models using irreversible hydrocolloid impression material (Tropicalgin, Zhermack, Italy) to make impressions and a Type III dental stone (Elite Model, Zhermack, Italy) to pour the casts, both mixed with sterile distilled water according to the manufacturer’s instructions.


Efficacy of Disinfection of Dental Stone Casts: Virkon versus Sodium Hypochlorite.

Moslehifard E, Lotfipour F, Robati Anaraki M, Shafee E, Tamjid-Shabestari S, Ghaffari T - J Dent (Tehran) (2015)

Dental arches with (a) metal and (b) acrylic spherical extensions 10 mm in diameter.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663311&req=5

Figure 1: Dental arches with (a) metal and (b) acrylic spherical extensions 10 mm in diameter.
Mentions: Acrylic dental arches were prepared with 10 unique spherical metal extensions 10 mm in diameter in the place of teeth (Figure 1). Then, stone casts were prepared by duplicating the acrylic models using irreversible hydrocolloid impression material (Tropicalgin, Zhermack, Italy) to make impressions and a Type III dental stone (Elite Model, Zhermack, Italy) to pour the casts, both mixed with sterile distilled water according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

Bottom Line: We observed different bactericidal effects of Virkon at various concentrations; 1% Virkon killed S. aureus, P aeruginosa, and Candida albicans, while 3% Virkon solution was required to kill B. subtilis.For B. subtilis, the efficacy of 3% Virkon and 0.525% sodium hypochlorite was not significantly different (P >0.999).According to the obtained results for Virkon and based on its low toxicity and good environmental compatibility, it may be recommended as an antimicrobial disinfectant for dental stone casts as non-critical items.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Assistant Professor, Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The purpose of this experimental study was to compare the disinfection efficacy of sodium hypochlorite and peroxygenic acid (Virkon) solutions for dental stone casts contaminated with microbial strains.

Materials and methods: A total of 960 spherical stone beads with a diameter of 10 mm were prepared and used as carriers of bacterial inoculums. They were individually inoculated by soaking in broth culture media containing each of the four understudy microorganisms. Different concentrations of Virkon and hypochlorite solutions were prepared using distilled water and then were sprayed on the surfaces of dental casts contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis and Candida albicans. The pour plate technique was used to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of each solution. Microbicidal effect (ME) was calculated according to the log10 of control colony counts minus the log10 of the remaining colony counts after the antimicrobial procedure. Statistical difference was assessed using the Kruskal Wallis and the Man Whitney U tests with a significance of 95%.

Results: We observed different bactericidal effects of Virkon at various concentrations; 1% Virkon killed S. aureus, P aeruginosa, and Candida albicans, while 3% Virkon solution was required to kill B. subtilis. For S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, and C. albicans, no significant difference was observed between 1% Virkon and 0.525% sodium hypochlorite (P >0.05). For B. subtilis, the efficacy of 3% Virkon and 0.525% sodium hypochlorite was not significantly different (P >0.999).

Conclusion: According to the obtained results for Virkon and based on its low toxicity and good environmental compatibility, it may be recommended as an antimicrobial disinfectant for dental stone casts as non-critical items.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus