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First Steps Toward Ultrasound-Based Motion Compensation for Imaging and Therapy: Calibration with an Optical System and 4D PET Imaging.

Schwaab J, Kurz C, Sarti C, Bongers A, Schoenahl F, Bert C, Debus J, Parodi K, Jenne JW - Front Oncol (2015)

Bottom Line: Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the US probe being within the PET field of view generally has no relevant influence on the image quality.The accuracy and precision of all the steps in the calibration workflow for US tracking-based 4D PET imaging are found to be in an acceptable range for clinical implementation.Eventually, we show in vitro that an US-based motion tracking in absolute room coordinates with a moving US transducer is feasible.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Mediri GmbH , Heidelberg , Germany.

ABSTRACT
Target motion, particularly in the abdomen, due to respiration or patient movement is still a challenge in many diagnostic and therapeutic processes. Hence, methods to detect and compensate this motion are required. Diagnostic ultrasound (US) represents a non-invasive and dose-free alternative to fluoroscopy, providing more information about internal target motion than respiration belt or optical tracking. The goal of this project is to develop an US-based motion tracking for real-time motion correction in radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging, notably in 4D positron emission tomography (PET). In this work, a workflow is established to enable the transformation of US tracking data to the coordinates of the treatment delivery or imaging system - even if the US probe is moving due to respiration. It is shown that the US tracking signal is equally adequate for 4D PET image reconstruction as the clinically used respiration belt and provides additional opportunities in this concern. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the US probe being within the PET field of view generally has no relevant influence on the image quality. The accuracy and precision of all the steps in the calibration workflow for US tracking-based 4D PET imaging are found to be in an acceptable range for clinical implementation. Eventually, we show in vitro that an US-based motion tracking in absolute room coordinates with a moving US transducer is feasible.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Activity profiles of static (left) and moving (cosine4) point source in PET images. Middle: the activity of the source is smeared over the whole motion amplitude (here 3 cm) if not corrected for. Right: using the 4D gated reconstruction based on the breathing belt (blue rhombi) as well as the ultrasound (red dots) signal, the Gaussian shape and integral activity can be recovered.
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Figure 6: Activity profiles of static (left) and moving (cosine4) point source in PET images. Middle: the activity of the source is smeared over the whole motion amplitude (here 3 cm) if not corrected for. Right: using the 4D gated reconstruction based on the breathing belt (blue rhombi) as well as the ultrasound (red dots) signal, the Gaussian shape and integral activity can be recovered.

Mentions: As shown in Figure 6 for the cosine4 motion, movement of the point source led to a considerable smearing of the point-like activity in the direction of motion and to a remarkably larger integral activity in the 3D reconstructed image due to the reduced partial volume effect. If, on the other hand, a 4D-gated image reconstruction was performed, motion-induced blurring was significantly reduced and the original Gaussian shape of the point source as well as the correct integral activity was recovered. This is shown in Figure 6 (right) for both considered motion monitoring systems, the breathing belt and the US tracking. Still, compared to the static reference, the full width at half maximum (FWHM) increased from 5.2 ± 0.2 (1σ) to 8.2 ± 0.2 (1σ) mm due to the residual motion within each of the eight considered motion phases.


First Steps Toward Ultrasound-Based Motion Compensation for Imaging and Therapy: Calibration with an Optical System and 4D PET Imaging.

Schwaab J, Kurz C, Sarti C, Bongers A, Schoenahl F, Bert C, Debus J, Parodi K, Jenne JW - Front Oncol (2015)

Activity profiles of static (left) and moving (cosine4) point source in PET images. Middle: the activity of the source is smeared over the whole motion amplitude (here 3 cm) if not corrected for. Right: using the 4D gated reconstruction based on the breathing belt (blue rhombi) as well as the ultrasound (red dots) signal, the Gaussian shape and integral activity can be recovered.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663279&req=5

Figure 6: Activity profiles of static (left) and moving (cosine4) point source in PET images. Middle: the activity of the source is smeared over the whole motion amplitude (here 3 cm) if not corrected for. Right: using the 4D gated reconstruction based on the breathing belt (blue rhombi) as well as the ultrasound (red dots) signal, the Gaussian shape and integral activity can be recovered.
Mentions: As shown in Figure 6 for the cosine4 motion, movement of the point source led to a considerable smearing of the point-like activity in the direction of motion and to a remarkably larger integral activity in the 3D reconstructed image due to the reduced partial volume effect. If, on the other hand, a 4D-gated image reconstruction was performed, motion-induced blurring was significantly reduced and the original Gaussian shape of the point source as well as the correct integral activity was recovered. This is shown in Figure 6 (right) for both considered motion monitoring systems, the breathing belt and the US tracking. Still, compared to the static reference, the full width at half maximum (FWHM) increased from 5.2 ± 0.2 (1σ) to 8.2 ± 0.2 (1σ) mm due to the residual motion within each of the eight considered motion phases.

Bottom Line: Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the US probe being within the PET field of view generally has no relevant influence on the image quality.The accuracy and precision of all the steps in the calibration workflow for US tracking-based 4D PET imaging are found to be in an acceptable range for clinical implementation.Eventually, we show in vitro that an US-based motion tracking in absolute room coordinates with a moving US transducer is feasible.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Mediri GmbH , Heidelberg , Germany.

ABSTRACT
Target motion, particularly in the abdomen, due to respiration or patient movement is still a challenge in many diagnostic and therapeutic processes. Hence, methods to detect and compensate this motion are required. Diagnostic ultrasound (US) represents a non-invasive and dose-free alternative to fluoroscopy, providing more information about internal target motion than respiration belt or optical tracking. The goal of this project is to develop an US-based motion tracking for real-time motion correction in radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging, notably in 4D positron emission tomography (PET). In this work, a workflow is established to enable the transformation of US tracking data to the coordinates of the treatment delivery or imaging system - even if the US probe is moving due to respiration. It is shown that the US tracking signal is equally adequate for 4D PET image reconstruction as the clinically used respiration belt and provides additional opportunities in this concern. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the US probe being within the PET field of view generally has no relevant influence on the image quality. The accuracy and precision of all the steps in the calibration workflow for US tracking-based 4D PET imaging are found to be in an acceptable range for clinical implementation. Eventually, we show in vitro that an US-based motion tracking in absolute room coordinates with a moving US transducer is feasible.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus