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First Steps Toward Ultrasound-Based Motion Compensation for Imaging and Therapy: Calibration with an Optical System and 4D PET Imaging.

Schwaab J, Kurz C, Sarti C, Bongers A, Schoenahl F, Bert C, Debus J, Parodi K, Jenne JW - Front Oncol (2015)

Bottom Line: Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the US probe being within the PET field of view generally has no relevant influence on the image quality.The accuracy and precision of all the steps in the calibration workflow for US tracking-based 4D PET imaging are found to be in an acceptable range for clinical implementation.Eventually, we show in vitro that an US-based motion tracking in absolute room coordinates with a moving US transducer is feasible.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Mediri GmbH , Heidelberg , Germany.

ABSTRACT
Target motion, particularly in the abdomen, due to respiration or patient movement is still a challenge in many diagnostic and therapeutic processes. Hence, methods to detect and compensate this motion are required. Diagnostic ultrasound (US) represents a non-invasive and dose-free alternative to fluoroscopy, providing more information about internal target motion than respiration belt or optical tracking. The goal of this project is to develop an US-based motion tracking for real-time motion correction in radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging, notably in 4D positron emission tomography (PET). In this work, a workflow is established to enable the transformation of US tracking data to the coordinates of the treatment delivery or imaging system - even if the US probe is moving due to respiration. It is shown that the US tracking signal is equally adequate for 4D PET image reconstruction as the clinically used respiration belt and provides additional opportunities in this concern. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the US probe being within the PET field of view generally has no relevant influence on the image quality. The accuracy and precision of all the steps in the calibration workflow for US tracking-based 4D PET imaging are found to be in an acceptable range for clinical implementation. Eventually, we show in vitro that an US-based motion tracking in absolute room coordinates with a moving US transducer is feasible.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Experimental setup for ultrasound-based motion tracking with static US probe (left) and with the US probe being moved by the ANZAI respiratory phantom (right) (from the optical sensor’s point of view). The setup was positioned on the patient table of the PET/CT scanner. The US target (rubber ball) and the rigidly attached PET 22Na point source were moved by the QUASAR motion platform. Motion was detected by the ANZAI breathing belt and the US probe in parallel.
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Figure 3: Experimental setup for ultrasound-based motion tracking with static US probe (left) and with the US probe being moved by the ANZAI respiratory phantom (right) (from the optical sensor’s point of view). The setup was positioned on the patient table of the PET/CT scanner. The US target (rubber ball) and the rigidly attached PET 22Na point source were moved by the QUASAR motion platform. Motion was detected by the ANZAI breathing belt and the US probe in parallel.

Mentions: In this part of the study, motion compensation in 4D PET imaging based on the presented US tracking system was compared to the performance of a commercial breathing belt. The experimental setup is shown in Figure 3 (left). A point source was moved along the PET/CT scanner axis by a respiratory motion phantom. A rubber ball was rigidly attached to the point source and put into a water-filled tank, which the US probe was coupled to through a Mylar foil window. Motion was simultaneously detected by the breathing belt, directly at the motion phantom as a standard reference, and by the US system, tracking the contour of the rubber ball. The whole setup was placed in the bore of the PET/CT scanner. A regular cosine4-shaped motion pattern with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 3 cm and a period of 4 s as well as a real patient motion trajectory with a maximum peak-to-peak amplitude of 3 cm were investigated. The latter one was recorded once during a real 30-min 4D patient PET/CT scan using the breathing belt and could be reproduced by the motion phantom. All trajectories were one dimensional along the scanner axis and inside the bore.


First Steps Toward Ultrasound-Based Motion Compensation for Imaging and Therapy: Calibration with an Optical System and 4D PET Imaging.

Schwaab J, Kurz C, Sarti C, Bongers A, Schoenahl F, Bert C, Debus J, Parodi K, Jenne JW - Front Oncol (2015)

Experimental setup for ultrasound-based motion tracking with static US probe (left) and with the US probe being moved by the ANZAI respiratory phantom (right) (from the optical sensor’s point of view). The setup was positioned on the patient table of the PET/CT scanner. The US target (rubber ball) and the rigidly attached PET 22Na point source were moved by the QUASAR motion platform. Motion was detected by the ANZAI breathing belt and the US probe in parallel.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663279&req=5

Figure 3: Experimental setup for ultrasound-based motion tracking with static US probe (left) and with the US probe being moved by the ANZAI respiratory phantom (right) (from the optical sensor’s point of view). The setup was positioned on the patient table of the PET/CT scanner. The US target (rubber ball) and the rigidly attached PET 22Na point source were moved by the QUASAR motion platform. Motion was detected by the ANZAI breathing belt and the US probe in parallel.
Mentions: In this part of the study, motion compensation in 4D PET imaging based on the presented US tracking system was compared to the performance of a commercial breathing belt. The experimental setup is shown in Figure 3 (left). A point source was moved along the PET/CT scanner axis by a respiratory motion phantom. A rubber ball was rigidly attached to the point source and put into a water-filled tank, which the US probe was coupled to through a Mylar foil window. Motion was simultaneously detected by the breathing belt, directly at the motion phantom as a standard reference, and by the US system, tracking the contour of the rubber ball. The whole setup was placed in the bore of the PET/CT scanner. A regular cosine4-shaped motion pattern with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 3 cm and a period of 4 s as well as a real patient motion trajectory with a maximum peak-to-peak amplitude of 3 cm were investigated. The latter one was recorded once during a real 30-min 4D patient PET/CT scan using the breathing belt and could be reproduced by the motion phantom. All trajectories were one dimensional along the scanner axis and inside the bore.

Bottom Line: Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the US probe being within the PET field of view generally has no relevant influence on the image quality.The accuracy and precision of all the steps in the calibration workflow for US tracking-based 4D PET imaging are found to be in an acceptable range for clinical implementation.Eventually, we show in vitro that an US-based motion tracking in absolute room coordinates with a moving US transducer is feasible.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Mediri GmbH , Heidelberg , Germany.

ABSTRACT
Target motion, particularly in the abdomen, due to respiration or patient movement is still a challenge in many diagnostic and therapeutic processes. Hence, methods to detect and compensate this motion are required. Diagnostic ultrasound (US) represents a non-invasive and dose-free alternative to fluoroscopy, providing more information about internal target motion than respiration belt or optical tracking. The goal of this project is to develop an US-based motion tracking for real-time motion correction in radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging, notably in 4D positron emission tomography (PET). In this work, a workflow is established to enable the transformation of US tracking data to the coordinates of the treatment delivery or imaging system - even if the US probe is moving due to respiration. It is shown that the US tracking signal is equally adequate for 4D PET image reconstruction as the clinically used respiration belt and provides additional opportunities in this concern. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the US probe being within the PET field of view generally has no relevant influence on the image quality. The accuracy and precision of all the steps in the calibration workflow for US tracking-based 4D PET imaging are found to be in an acceptable range for clinical implementation. Eventually, we show in vitro that an US-based motion tracking in absolute room coordinates with a moving US transducer is feasible.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus