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Disturbed T Cell Signaling and Altered Th17 and Regulatory T Cell Subsets in the Pathogenesis of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

Rother N, van der Vlag J - Front Immunol (2015)

Bottom Line: In particular, defects in the TCRζ chain, Syk kinase, and calcium signaling molecules have been associated with SLE, which leads to hyperresponsive autoreactive T cells.In addition, reduced numbers of Tregs as well as Tregs with an impaired regulatory function have been associated with SLE.The altered balance between the number of Tregs and Th17 cells in SLE may result from changes in the cytokine milieu that favors the development of Th17 cells over Tregs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nephrology, Radboud University Medical Center, Radboud Institute of Molecular Life Sciences , Nijmegen , Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the presence of autoantibodies against nuclear components. Circulating immune complexes of chromatin and autoantibodies deposit in various tissues leading to inflammation and tissue damage. It has been well documented that autoimmunity in SLE depends on autoreactive T cells. In this review, we summarize the literature that addresses the roles of T cell signaling, and Th17 and regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the development of SLE. T cell receptor (TCR) signaling appears to be aberrant in T cells of patients with SLE. In particular, defects in the TCRζ chain, Syk kinase, and calcium signaling molecules have been associated with SLE, which leads to hyperresponsive autoreactive T cells. Furthermore, in patients with SLE increased numbers of autoreactive Th17 cells have been documented, and Th17 cells appear to be responsible for tissue inflammation and damage. In addition, reduced numbers of Tregs as well as Tregs with an impaired regulatory function have been associated with SLE. The altered balance between the number of Tregs and Th17 cells in SLE may result from changes in the cytokine milieu that favors the development of Th17 cells over Tregs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Disturbed balance between Tregs and Th17 cells in SLE. Cytokines important in the induction and proliferation of respective cell types are depicted. Furthermore, also characteristic surface marker, transcription factors, and produced cytokines are illustrated. Red arrows indicate changes in expression found in SLE patients. Furthermore, treatment possibilities are depicted in red.
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Figure 2: Disturbed balance between Tregs and Th17 cells in SLE. Cytokines important in the induction and proliferation of respective cell types are depicted. Furthermore, also characteristic surface marker, transcription factors, and produced cytokines are illustrated. Red arrows indicate changes in expression found in SLE patients. Furthermore, treatment possibilities are depicted in red.

Mentions: As outlined above, there is strong evidence for a disturbed balance between Th17 cells and Tregs in patients with SLE. However, the mechanisms underlying alterations in numbers and/or function of Th17 and Tregs in SLE are only partially understood, but may involve the overall cytokine milieu (see Figure 2).


Disturbed T Cell Signaling and Altered Th17 and Regulatory T Cell Subsets in the Pathogenesis of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

Rother N, van der Vlag J - Front Immunol (2015)

Disturbed balance between Tregs and Th17 cells in SLE. Cytokines important in the induction and proliferation of respective cell types are depicted. Furthermore, also characteristic surface marker, transcription factors, and produced cytokines are illustrated. Red arrows indicate changes in expression found in SLE patients. Furthermore, treatment possibilities are depicted in red.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663269&req=5

Figure 2: Disturbed balance between Tregs and Th17 cells in SLE. Cytokines important in the induction and proliferation of respective cell types are depicted. Furthermore, also characteristic surface marker, transcription factors, and produced cytokines are illustrated. Red arrows indicate changes in expression found in SLE patients. Furthermore, treatment possibilities are depicted in red.
Mentions: As outlined above, there is strong evidence for a disturbed balance between Th17 cells and Tregs in patients with SLE. However, the mechanisms underlying alterations in numbers and/or function of Th17 and Tregs in SLE are only partially understood, but may involve the overall cytokine milieu (see Figure 2).

Bottom Line: In particular, defects in the TCRζ chain, Syk kinase, and calcium signaling molecules have been associated with SLE, which leads to hyperresponsive autoreactive T cells.In addition, reduced numbers of Tregs as well as Tregs with an impaired regulatory function have been associated with SLE.The altered balance between the number of Tregs and Th17 cells in SLE may result from changes in the cytokine milieu that favors the development of Th17 cells over Tregs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nephrology, Radboud University Medical Center, Radboud Institute of Molecular Life Sciences , Nijmegen , Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the presence of autoantibodies against nuclear components. Circulating immune complexes of chromatin and autoantibodies deposit in various tissues leading to inflammation and tissue damage. It has been well documented that autoimmunity in SLE depends on autoreactive T cells. In this review, we summarize the literature that addresses the roles of T cell signaling, and Th17 and regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the development of SLE. T cell receptor (TCR) signaling appears to be aberrant in T cells of patients with SLE. In particular, defects in the TCRζ chain, Syk kinase, and calcium signaling molecules have been associated with SLE, which leads to hyperresponsive autoreactive T cells. Furthermore, in patients with SLE increased numbers of autoreactive Th17 cells have been documented, and Th17 cells appear to be responsible for tissue inflammation and damage. In addition, reduced numbers of Tregs as well as Tregs with an impaired regulatory function have been associated with SLE. The altered balance between the number of Tregs and Th17 cells in SLE may result from changes in the cytokine milieu that favors the development of Th17 cells over Tregs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus