Limits...
Are Happy Faces Attractive? The Roles of Early vs. Late Processing.

Sun D, Chan CC, Fan J, Wu Y, Lee TM - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: Facial attractiveness is closely related to romantic love.We found that attractiveness and expression were reflected by two early components, P2-lateral (P2l) and P2-medial (P2m), respectively; their interaction effect was reflected by LPP, a late component.The findings suggested that facial attractiveness and expression are first processed in parallel for discrimination between stimuli.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Neuropsychology, The University of Hong Kong Hong Kong, China.

ABSTRACT
Facial attractiveness is closely related to romantic love. To understand if the neural underpinnings of perceived facial attractiveness and facial expression are similar constructs, we recorded neural signals using an event-related potential (ERP) methodology for 20 participants who were viewing faces with varied attractiveness and expressions. We found that attractiveness and expression were reflected by two early components, P2-lateral (P2l) and P2-medial (P2m), respectively; their interaction effect was reflected by LPP, a late component. The findings suggested that facial attractiveness and expression are first processed in parallel for discrimination between stimuli. After the initial processing, more attentional resources are allocated to the faces with the most positive or most negative valence in both the attractiveness and expression dimensions. The findings contribute to the theoretical model of face perception.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Face stimuli, task paradigm and EEG channel locations. A1, attractive; A2, less attractive; UA2, less unattractive; UA1, unattractive; H1, happy; H2, less happy; S2, less sad; S1, sad.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663264&req=5

Figure 1: Face stimuli, task paradigm and EEG channel locations. A1, attractive; A2, less attractive; UA2, less unattractive; UA1, unattractive; H1, happy; H2, less happy; S2, less sad; S1, sad.

Mentions: Photos of real human faces have often been utilized in previous studies on face perception. They are of high ecological validity, but their confounding factors (e.g., hair color/style, glasses, skin color/texture and sizes/positions of eyes, nose, mouth, and ears) are difficult to control for. Here, we employed fabricated facial stimuli, which were adapted from a few standard face templates, to control the variables of no interest. Facial stimuli were fabricated in two phases. The first phase was to generate face templates with varied levels of attractiveness, while the second phase was to integrate the different levels of facial expressions for forming the final stimuli. In the first phase, 32 Chinese faces (16 females and 16 males) with varied levels of attractiveness were generated with FaceGen software (FaceGen Modeler v3.4). All the faces were of front view with eyes gazing forward. The skin color, hair color, and illumination were also adjusted to the same level across stimuli. The validity of these 32 stimuli was verified by asking a different group of 20 participants to assign ratings reflecting the levels of attractiveness. Faces with the highest (attractive, or A1) and the lowest (unattractive, or UA1) mean ratings, and those with ratings in the 66th percentile (less attractive, or A2) and 33rd percentile (less unattractive, or UA2), were chosen. This resulted in 4 male and 4 female facial templates. In the second phase, happy (H1), less happy (H2), less sad (S2), and sad (S1) expressions were modeled to each of the facial templates according to the criteria described by Ekman (2003), which include raising (or lowering) the tails of both eyes and the edges of the mouth for a happier (or sadder) expression. This produced 32 facial stimuli (8 stimuli × 4 expressions, see Figure 1) for use in the main study.


Are Happy Faces Attractive? The Roles of Early vs. Late Processing.

Sun D, Chan CC, Fan J, Wu Y, Lee TM - Front Psychol (2015)

Face stimuli, task paradigm and EEG channel locations. A1, attractive; A2, less attractive; UA2, less unattractive; UA1, unattractive; H1, happy; H2, less happy; S2, less sad; S1, sad.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663264&req=5

Figure 1: Face stimuli, task paradigm and EEG channel locations. A1, attractive; A2, less attractive; UA2, less unattractive; UA1, unattractive; H1, happy; H2, less happy; S2, less sad; S1, sad.
Mentions: Photos of real human faces have often been utilized in previous studies on face perception. They are of high ecological validity, but their confounding factors (e.g., hair color/style, glasses, skin color/texture and sizes/positions of eyes, nose, mouth, and ears) are difficult to control for. Here, we employed fabricated facial stimuli, which were adapted from a few standard face templates, to control the variables of no interest. Facial stimuli were fabricated in two phases. The first phase was to generate face templates with varied levels of attractiveness, while the second phase was to integrate the different levels of facial expressions for forming the final stimuli. In the first phase, 32 Chinese faces (16 females and 16 males) with varied levels of attractiveness were generated with FaceGen software (FaceGen Modeler v3.4). All the faces were of front view with eyes gazing forward. The skin color, hair color, and illumination were also adjusted to the same level across stimuli. The validity of these 32 stimuli was verified by asking a different group of 20 participants to assign ratings reflecting the levels of attractiveness. Faces with the highest (attractive, or A1) and the lowest (unattractive, or UA1) mean ratings, and those with ratings in the 66th percentile (less attractive, or A2) and 33rd percentile (less unattractive, or UA2), were chosen. This resulted in 4 male and 4 female facial templates. In the second phase, happy (H1), less happy (H2), less sad (S2), and sad (S1) expressions were modeled to each of the facial templates according to the criteria described by Ekman (2003), which include raising (or lowering) the tails of both eyes and the edges of the mouth for a happier (or sadder) expression. This produced 32 facial stimuli (8 stimuli × 4 expressions, see Figure 1) for use in the main study.

Bottom Line: Facial attractiveness is closely related to romantic love.We found that attractiveness and expression were reflected by two early components, P2-lateral (P2l) and P2-medial (P2m), respectively; their interaction effect was reflected by LPP, a late component.The findings suggested that facial attractiveness and expression are first processed in parallel for discrimination between stimuli.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Neuropsychology, The University of Hong Kong Hong Kong, China.

ABSTRACT
Facial attractiveness is closely related to romantic love. To understand if the neural underpinnings of perceived facial attractiveness and facial expression are similar constructs, we recorded neural signals using an event-related potential (ERP) methodology for 20 participants who were viewing faces with varied attractiveness and expressions. We found that attractiveness and expression were reflected by two early components, P2-lateral (P2l) and P2-medial (P2m), respectively; their interaction effect was reflected by LPP, a late component. The findings suggested that facial attractiveness and expression are first processed in parallel for discrimination between stimuli. After the initial processing, more attentional resources are allocated to the faces with the most positive or most negative valence in both the attractiveness and expression dimensions. The findings contribute to the theoretical model of face perception.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus