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Egocentric Direction and Position Perceptions are Dissociable Based on Only Static Lane Edge Information.

Nakashima R, Iwai R, Ueda S, Kumada T - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: Experiment 1 examined the effect of the "uprightness factor" using normal and inverted road images.Experiment 2 examined the effect of the "central vision factor" using normal and transposed road images where the upper half of the normal image was presented under the lower half.Experiment 3 aimed to replicate the results of Experiments 1 and 2.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: RIKEN Brain Science Institute-TOYOTA Collaboration Center, RIKEN Wako, Japan.

ABSTRACT
When observers perceive several objects in a space, at the same time, they should effectively perceive their own position as a viewpoint. However, little is known about observers' percepts of their own spatial location based on the visual scene information viewed from them. Previous studies indicate that two distinct visual spatial processes exist in the locomotion situation: the egocentric position perception and egocentric direction perception. Those studies examined such perceptions in information rich visual environments where much dynamic and static visual information was available. This study examined these two perceptions in information of impoverished environments, including only static lane edge information (i.e., limited information). We investigated the visual factors associated with static lane edge information that may affect these perceptions. Especially, we examined the effects of the two factors on egocentric direction and position perceptions. One is the "uprightness factor" that "far" visual information is seen at upper location than "near" visual information. The other is the "central vision factor" that observers usually look at "far" visual information using central vision (i.e., foveal vision) whereas 'near' visual information using peripheral vision. Experiment 1 examined the effect of the "uprightness factor" using normal and inverted road images. Experiment 2 examined the effect of the "central vision factor" using normal and transposed road images where the upper half of the normal image was presented under the lower half. Experiment 3 aimed to replicate the results of Experiments 1 and 2. Results showed that egocentric direction perception is interfered with image inversion or image transposition, whereas egocentric position perception is robust against these image transformations. That is, both "uprightness" and "central vision" factors are important for egocentric direction perception, but not for egocentric position perception. Therefore, the two visual spatial perceptions about observers' own viewpoints are fundamentally dissociable.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Examples of stimuli in the experiments.(A) Nine types of image in the normal image condition: three viewing direction manipulations (left, front, and right) × 3 viewing position manipulations (left, center, and right). In the front direction detection task, presented images were chosen from one row. In the center position detection task, presented images were chosen from one column. (B) An example of the inverted images used in Experiment 1. (C) An example of the transposed images used in Experiment 2. (D) An example of the inverted and transposed images used in Experiment 3.
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Figure 1: Examples of stimuli in the experiments.(A) Nine types of image in the normal image condition: three viewing direction manipulations (left, front, and right) × 3 viewing position manipulations (left, center, and right). In the front direction detection task, presented images were chosen from one row. In the center position detection task, presented images were chosen from one column. (B) An example of the inverted images used in Experiment 1. (C) An example of the transposed images used in Experiment 2. (D) An example of the inverted and transposed images used in Experiment 3.

Mentions: For the experimental session, we created nine types of road image (see Figure 1A), which consisted of three viewing direction manipulations (left, front, and right) × 3 viewing position manipulations (left, center, and right). In the front viewing direction image, the road was viewed from the viewpoint whose direction was the same as that of the straight road. In the left (right) viewing direction image, the road was viewed from a viewpoint whose direction was misaligned by 2° toward the left (right) from the direction of the straight road. In the left (and right) direction images, the location of the vanishing point slightly shifted to the left (and right). In the center viewing position image, the road was viewed from the viewpoint whose position was at the center of the lane. In the left (right) viewing position image, the road was viewed from a viewpoint whose position was shifted by about 10% of the lane width toward the left (right) from the center of the lane. We named these nine images as the “normal” images. The inverted images were created by vertically flipping the normal images (Figure 1B).


Egocentric Direction and Position Perceptions are Dissociable Based on Only Static Lane Edge Information.

Nakashima R, Iwai R, Ueda S, Kumada T - Front Psychol (2015)

Examples of stimuli in the experiments.(A) Nine types of image in the normal image condition: three viewing direction manipulations (left, front, and right) × 3 viewing position manipulations (left, center, and right). In the front direction detection task, presented images were chosen from one row. In the center position detection task, presented images were chosen from one column. (B) An example of the inverted images used in Experiment 1. (C) An example of the transposed images used in Experiment 2. (D) An example of the inverted and transposed images used in Experiment 3.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 1: Examples of stimuli in the experiments.(A) Nine types of image in the normal image condition: three viewing direction manipulations (left, front, and right) × 3 viewing position manipulations (left, center, and right). In the front direction detection task, presented images were chosen from one row. In the center position detection task, presented images were chosen from one column. (B) An example of the inverted images used in Experiment 1. (C) An example of the transposed images used in Experiment 2. (D) An example of the inverted and transposed images used in Experiment 3.
Mentions: For the experimental session, we created nine types of road image (see Figure 1A), which consisted of three viewing direction manipulations (left, front, and right) × 3 viewing position manipulations (left, center, and right). In the front viewing direction image, the road was viewed from the viewpoint whose direction was the same as that of the straight road. In the left (right) viewing direction image, the road was viewed from a viewpoint whose direction was misaligned by 2° toward the left (right) from the direction of the straight road. In the left (and right) direction images, the location of the vanishing point slightly shifted to the left (and right). In the center viewing position image, the road was viewed from the viewpoint whose position was at the center of the lane. In the left (right) viewing position image, the road was viewed from a viewpoint whose position was shifted by about 10% of the lane width toward the left (right) from the center of the lane. We named these nine images as the “normal” images. The inverted images were created by vertically flipping the normal images (Figure 1B).

Bottom Line: Experiment 1 examined the effect of the "uprightness factor" using normal and inverted road images.Experiment 2 examined the effect of the "central vision factor" using normal and transposed road images where the upper half of the normal image was presented under the lower half.Experiment 3 aimed to replicate the results of Experiments 1 and 2.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: RIKEN Brain Science Institute-TOYOTA Collaboration Center, RIKEN Wako, Japan.

ABSTRACT
When observers perceive several objects in a space, at the same time, they should effectively perceive their own position as a viewpoint. However, little is known about observers' percepts of their own spatial location based on the visual scene information viewed from them. Previous studies indicate that two distinct visual spatial processes exist in the locomotion situation: the egocentric position perception and egocentric direction perception. Those studies examined such perceptions in information rich visual environments where much dynamic and static visual information was available. This study examined these two perceptions in information of impoverished environments, including only static lane edge information (i.e., limited information). We investigated the visual factors associated with static lane edge information that may affect these perceptions. Especially, we examined the effects of the two factors on egocentric direction and position perceptions. One is the "uprightness factor" that "far" visual information is seen at upper location than "near" visual information. The other is the "central vision factor" that observers usually look at "far" visual information using central vision (i.e., foveal vision) whereas 'near' visual information using peripheral vision. Experiment 1 examined the effect of the "uprightness factor" using normal and inverted road images. Experiment 2 examined the effect of the "central vision factor" using normal and transposed road images where the upper half of the normal image was presented under the lower half. Experiment 3 aimed to replicate the results of Experiments 1 and 2. Results showed that egocentric direction perception is interfered with image inversion or image transposition, whereas egocentric position perception is robust against these image transformations. That is, both "uprightness" and "central vision" factors are important for egocentric direction perception, but not for egocentric position perception. Therefore, the two visual spatial perceptions about observers' own viewpoints are fundamentally dissociable.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus